The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. The World Health Organization recommended that people combine a reduction of processed foods high in saturated fats, sugar and salt[11] and caloric content of the diet with an increase in physical activity.[12]
Unlike a centrifugal juicer, the cold-pressing technique generates no heat when it is extracting the juice, making sure that the enzymes and nutrients from the fruits and vegetables stay in tact. We also do not HPP, or high-pressure process, our juices. This is a form of pasteurization that also can alter the integrity of the juice. Cold pressing allows our juices to have a shelf life of a few days, and during this time the nutrient content and taste will remain as fresh as possible.
When I say "cleanse," I mean it in the sense of true cleaning—a strategy that helps your body rid itself of toxins. We're exposed to harmful substances all the time; they're in our diet (pesticides, microbes, and mercury, to name a few) and the very air we breathe (think disinfectants, deodorizers, and the gasses released by fresh paint). Fortunately, we have an excellent system in place to handle those toxins: Enzymes throughout the body are continuously breaking them down and helping to flush them out. My 48-hour detox works by optimizing that system. It involves eating whole foods that are packed with nutrients believed to boost the activity of the enzymes and nourish the body's most important detoxifying organs—the liver, the lungs, the kidneys, and the colon—so they can do their jobs better and more efficiently.
Want your green smoothie to be extra chilly? Freeze your favorite fruits like ripe bananas (peel first), grapes, pineapple or berries. This is also a great way to not waste ripe fruits (like those brown bananas on your counter). You can also freeze your leafy greens in a freezer-safe bag. Just make sure to add your frozen greens straight to the blender (don’t defrost these fragile lil’ guys).
Fiber: Increasing dietary fiber can help promote weight loss. The best fiber supplements for weight loss are psyllium, guar gum, glucomannan, and pectin, because they are rich in water-soluble fibers. When consumed with water before meals, these fibers bind to water in the stomach to form a gelatinous mass, which increases a sense of satiety and prevents one from overeating. Fiber can also help enhance blood sugar control, decrease insulin levels, and reduce the number of calories absorbed by the body.6 Be sure to drink adequate amounts of water and start out with a dosage between 1 and 2 grams before meals and at bedtime and gradually increase the dosage to 5 grams with each meal. 7
Regular inadequate sleep plays havoc with more than the bags under your eyes; it also interferes with hormones that regulate hunger and, as a result, sleep-deprived people tend to overeat. Boost your zzz’s by hitting the sack about one hour earlier each night. Learn 9 Tips to Get Better Sleep, and then eat 6 Evening Foods for a Better Night’s Sleep.

Annabelle Johnstone-Dougall is an Australian Clinical Exercise Physiologist and Sports Scientist practising in London having completed her Honours degree at the University of Queensland in 2016.  As an Exercise Physiologist, Annabelle focuses on the prescription of exercise as medicine for a wide variety of conditions including metabolic syndromes, weight loss, cardiorespiratory and renal complications, musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions, mental health issues, disability, cancer, and geriatric care. Having competed in both triathlon and cycling at a national level, Sports Science is also an area for which Annabelle always had an intense passion and has been involved with sports performance, rehabilitation and strength and conditioning across a variety of sub-elite and elite sports.
—Bruce Lourie is President of Ivey Foundation, a private charitable foundation in Canada, and a director of the Independent Electricity System Operator (Ontario), Philanthropic Foundations Canada, Canadians for Clean Prosperity, and the San Francisco-based Consultative Group on Biological Diversity. Bruce is the co-author of two best-selling books and an honorary director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. In 2014 Bruce received Earth Day Canada’s Outstanding Commitment to the Environment Award and was named to Canada’s “Clean 50” group. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of Canada. Bruce holds a B.Sc. in Geology and a Master’s in Environmental Studies. Bruce is well known for his work in convening collaborative efforts among businesses, NGOs and government that achieve significant progress. Examples include the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, one of the world’s largest conservation initiatives, and his pioneering role in connecting environmental issues to human health, most notably with the shutdown of coal-fired power plants in Ontario, the single largest climate action in North America. Bruce is a founder of a number of for profit and non-profit organizations including Summerhill Group, the Sustainability Network, and the Canadian Environmental Grantmakers’ Network. He has acted on numerous international, federal, provincial and municipal bodies advising on environmental, health and energy policy issues. Bruce holds a B.Sc. in Geology and a Master’s in Environmental Studies.
—Bruce Lourie is President of Ivey Foundation, a private charitable foundation in Canada, and a director of the Independent Electricity System Operator (Ontario), Philanthropic Foundations Canada, Canadians for Clean Prosperity, and the San Francisco-based Consultative Group on Biological Diversity. Bruce is the co-author of two best-selling books and an honorary director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. In 2014 Bruce received Earth Day Canada’s Outstanding Commitment to the Environment Award and was named to Canada’s “Clean 50” group. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of Canada. Bruce holds a B.Sc. in Geology and a Master’s in Environmental Studies. Bruce is well known for his work in convening collaborative efforts among businesses, NGOs and government that achieve significant progress. Examples include the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement, one of the world’s largest conservation initiatives, and his pioneering role in connecting environmental issues to human health, most notably with the shutdown of coal-fired power plants in Ontario, the single largest climate action in North America. Bruce is a founder of a number of for profit and non-profit organizations including Summerhill Group, the Sustainability Network, and the Canadian Environmental Grantmakers’ Network. He has acted on numerous international, federal, provincial and municipal bodies advising on environmental, health and energy policy issues. Bruce holds a B.Sc. in Geology and a Master’s in Environmental Studies.

My passion for tea started when I was a little girl and I got my first tea set and tea table. The tea set was adorned with a gold and pink royal theme. I couldn't wait to have my friends over so that I could host my first tea party. I got so impatient and just could not wait for real people so I dressed up my dolls and sat them at my new tea table and hosted a grand event. I must say the guests were impressed and loved it as much as I did. Yes, my passion for tea was born. I became so passionate about tea that I even grew my own in a backyard garden. That passion is what I cultivated and carried throughout my career in Health, Fitness, Beauty and life.
You can’t avoid the work BUT you CAN make the work FUN! That’s what Blogilates is all about…helping you find THE JOY in working out! Because, if you can wake up in the morning super anxious to get your workout clothes on and start sweating, OMG, you’re set for success. You’re working out because YOU LOVE IT. And when you do anything that you love, the results will follow because you put your whole heart into it.
A shrub-like plant that can reach up to 6ft, Senna leaf has been popular as a laxative for centuries. The properties of the leaf were first described in the 9th century AD by Arabian physicians as a treatment for constipation. It is also considered an important herb in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. Maybe not the best topic to discuss over dinner, but great when you need some relief after dinner.
Consult your physician and follow all safety instructions before beginning any exercise program or using any supplement or meal replacement product, especially if you have any unique medical conditions or needs. The contents on our website are for informational purposes only, and are not intended to diagnose any medical condition, replace the advice of a healthcare professional, or provide any medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
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