Wave bye bye to soft drinks. Even zero-calorie ones. Or perhaps, especially no-calorie, diet soft drinks. In recent years, consumption of these “diet” drinks has been linked to greater weight gain, not less. And more recently, researchers have noted a link between intake of these beverages and a greater risk of both stroke and dementia. That includes Alzheimer’s disease. Yes, you read that right: artificially-sweetened drink consumption is associated with a significantly greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Even sugar-laced soft drinks aren’t that dangerous.
The Paleo diet, also referred to as the "caveman" or "Stone Age" diet, stems from the eating patterns of our ancestors who lived during the Paleolithic era, a time period associated with the development of mankind's tool-making skills, ending around 12,000 years ago. During that time, the women gathered fruit, berries, and vegetables, while the men hunted for meat. In today's modern era, the diet involves mimicking the same eating habits and consuming fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, healthful oils (eg, walnut, olive, coconut, and avocado), meat, fish, shellfish, poultry, and eggs in hopes of leading to a more healthful and disease-free life. The diet also encourages consumption of cage-free eggs and grass-fed meats (lean meat is recommended). It prohibits eating grains, dairy, legumes, potatoes, refined sugar, and refined vegetable oils, because proponents claim these foods appeared only after the agricultural revolution and are associated with inflammation and therefore many chronic conditions including heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Not only is the diet touted as a more healthful eating pattern but it's also promoted as beneficial for weight loss.
Salmon is a type 2 diabetes superfood because salmon is a great source of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. There are differences in the fatty acids in wild vs. farmed salmon. This is because of what the fish eat. Wild salmon eat smaller fish and live in colder waters, which causes them to develop a higher ratio of anti-inflammatory omega-3s to saturated fats in their meat. Farmed fish are up to 10 times higher in persistent organic pollutants, antibiotics, and other contaminants. These harmful chemicals are pro-inflammatory and have been associated with increased risk of cancer and heart disease.
Phase 1. This two-week phase is designed to eliminate cravings for foods high in sugar and refined starches to jump-start weight loss. You cut out almost all carbohydrates from your diet, including pasta, rice, bread and fruit. You can't drink fruit juice or any alcohol. You focus on eating lean protein, such as seafood, skinless poultry, lean beef and soy products. You can also eat high-fiber vegetables, low-fat dairy and foods with healthy, unsaturated fats, including avocados, nuts and seeds.
Though this diet will help you drop weight and quickly, all while eating ice cream and sticking to a cheap budget, the fact that you're taking in fewer calories than you're burning in a day means that, eventually, you'll burn out. A healthy lifestyle requires eating nutritious foods and exercising. A diet with this low caloric intake doesn't provide your body with enough energy to burn if you're looking to make working out or simply getting more active a part of your daily routine.

The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
Both the keto diet and the paleo diet are all the rage right now, with many people choosing one or the other in an effort to change their eating habits, get healthier, and be better able to enjoy their lives. For many people, however, it can be difficult or even confusing to understand the differences between the two and how to manipulate their eating habits in order to achieve their goals. If you're thinking about a drastic lifestyle change,...

Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.
And, of course, the low-cal nature of the military diet can dangerous, says Amidor. This is especially true if you plan to exercise: Attempting to do high-intensity workouts on such a low-calorie diet could potentially cause you to become weak, light-headed, and fatigued—so low-intensity cardio or walking is your safest option during this diet, says Allen.

The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is a dietary pattern promoted by the U.S.-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as one of its ideal eating plans for all Americans.[1]
Origins and Evolution of Human Diet was an academic web site at the University of Arkansas devoted to discussion of evolution and the human diet. They had good articles on the conferences link. Here is one from the archives: Boyd Eaton's Evolution, Diet and Health which argues that current w-6 : w-3 imbalance together with absolute dietary DHA intake quite low in human evolutionary perspective may be relevant to the frequency of unipolar depression.

I believe our opportunistic ancestors would have eaten whatever was available to them regionally; they would have only eaten avocados in regions that provided them. Many modern day 'Paleo Diet' products available for purchase would not have been available to Paleolithic humans. Like Veganism, the Paleo Diet is a modern construct that relies on technology for transportation, agriculture and food production. Paleolithic humans would have eaten what was within reach and, maybe, what could be traded.  
It’s great to be able to find free South Beach Diet information online, but there’s really no substitute for reading the original books by Arthur Agatston, MD. Before embarking on any diet, it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into over the long haul and to thoroughly understand the reasons for the food choices you’ll be making. There are several different books on the South Beach Diet that you can order online or download straight to your Kindle. Until you get your copy of the book, we have plenty of ​South Beach Diet resources on this site. Additionally, you can check out the South Beach Diet website for more information.
Phase 1. This two-week phase is designed to eliminate cravings for foods high in sugar and refined starches to jump-start weight loss. You cut out almost all carbohydrates from your diet, including pasta, rice, bread and fruit. You can't drink fruit juice or any alcohol. You focus on eating lean protein, such as seafood, skinless poultry, lean beef and soy products. You can also eat high-fiber vegetables, low-fat dairy and foods with healthy, unsaturated fats, including avocados, nuts and seeds.
Author of the South Beach diet is the American cardiologist Arthur Agatston. Agatston has acquired a good reputation internationally, particularly for his research in the field of imaging in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Agatston defined the so called Agatston score used in CT scanning of the coronary arteries to describe the amount of calcium in the arterial wall. Agatston now works as a professor of Cardiology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida, USA. The principles of the South Beach are not very different from the ideology of the Atkins diet. Despite that, Dr. Agatston has said that weight loss is not the main objective of the South Beach diet. He underlines that South Beach is meant to improve health by changing the “chemistry” of the blood.
The food options available on the DASH diet closely mirror the eating plan recommended in the US Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate, with a focus on whole foods, such as fruit and veggies; fat-free or low-fat dairy; whole grains; and lean meats, like fish and poultry. (3) Meanwhile, the plan requires cutting back on, or preferably eliminating, processed foods, like sugary drinks and packaged snacks, and limiting red meat, which in excess has been linked to poorer heart health and heart failure, according to a study published in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. (4)
The plan costs $299.99 per month without snacks and $339.99 with snacks. A la carte items start at $2.49. You’ll have to budget more, too, to add in fresh items; the company supplies its ham and vegetable frittata, for instance, but you supply the whole-wheat toast and avocado slices. For all phases, South Beach Diet offers a website called The Palm with recipes, tips and weight loss articles.

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and the diet was developed for a research study in the early 1990s.1 The purpose of the study was to identify a food-based strategy to lower blood pressure. Even though the original research was quite a long time ago, scientists recently conducted a meta-analysis for a DASH diet review to summarize how much blood pressure can be reduced by the DASH diet. The study found, on average, people reduce their blood pressure by 6.7 mmHg systolic and 3.5 mmHg diastolic in just two weeks. The more sodium is restricted, the lower blood pressure goes.


Jump up ^ The USDA recommends the USDA Food Patterns including their vegetarian and vegan adaptations, the Mediterranean, and the DASH Eating Plan, in U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2010). "2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans" (PDF). health.gov (Chapter 5 in 7 ed.). U.S. Government Printing Office. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
Similarly, any foods that were not easily available to Paleolithic humans are off-limits in this diet, Holley explains. That means processed foods — many of which contain added butter, margarine, and sugar — should not be a part of the paleo diet. The same goes for dairy, which may not have been accessible to Paleolithic humans, and legumes, which many proponents of the diet believe are not easily digestible by the body.
The DASH diet is a plant-focused diet, rich in fruits and vegetables, nuts, with low-fat and non-fat dairy, lean meats, fish, and poultry, mostly whole grains, and heart healthy fats. You fill up on delicious fruits and vegetables, paired up with protein-rich foods to quench your hunger. This makes a plan that is so easy to follow. The full DASH diet plan is shown here and sample menus are shown here.
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