The original study to examine the efficacy of the DASH diet was conducted at four sites as a randomized controlled feeding study. While the diet provided 3,600 mg of sodium per day—significantly more than the current recommendation of 2,300 mg—it showed significant reductions in blood pressure as quickly as two weeks after the start of the diet, suggesting that the combination of foods and nutrients is what provides the greatest blood pressure-lowering effects.4
Thank you for taking such a responsible viewpoint in this article. I think so many people and websites nowadays are talking about these diets, like the military diet, as a great way to drop weight quickly, but without discussion the repercussions or downsides to them. I don’t think a diet like this is healthy at all, and while it may be handy if you desperately need to drop a few pounds in a few days, I just don’t think it’s a healthy thing to do at all. I think it’s far better to maintain a healthy lifestyle and healthy diet 24/7/365 instead.
Protein is the macronutrient that contains no carbohydrates (unless breaded, fried, or covered in sauce/condiments). Adequate protein intake is important for boosting immunity, wound healing, muscle recovery, and has satiating power. When eating a calorie controlled diet, it's important to choose lean protein (as these types will have fewer calories and fat).
In this video, you can check out the experience this mom of 2 had with the diet. After going through pregnancy two years in a row, Kassia wanted to get rid of the baby weight she was still carrying from her pregnancies. She and her grandmother both followed the diet; and the results may shock you. Kassia recorded her journey through the diet, although her grandmother did not. In any case, both of them had great success with the diet. Kassia’s grandmother suffered with hunger pangs more than Kassia did. They were so thrilled with the results that they planned to continue using the diet in the future for continued weight loss. Check out their full story and find out exactly how many pounds they dropped in the video.
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.

Optimal Diet is a dietary model of human nutrition devised and implemented by Dr. Jan Kwasniewski. Lots of fat and low in carbs. Lots and lots of articles collected from various places. He has an out-of-print book: Optimal Nutrition. The book is explained at the Australian Homo Optimus Association website. A thorough analysis is the first post here: Dr. Kwasniewski's Optimal Diet: Sanity, Clarity, Facts.


Even if you’re seeing improvement with regular exercise, do not change your prescribed insulin regimen without consulting your doctor. Test prior to, during, and after exercise if you are on insulin and adding or making changes to your exercise program. This is true even if you think the insulin is causing you to gain weight. Changing your insulin plan could have a dangerous effect on your blood sugar levels. These changes could cause life-threatening complications.


One of the central claims of the Military Diet is that your meals are arranged in “fat-burning” food combinations. However, “There’s no science behind it,” says Gomer. You may still lose weight if the calories you’re consuming are less than the calories you’re burning off throughout your day. But nothing about pairing grapefruit with peanut butter toast will necessarily help you slim your waistline more than another combination of similarly caloric foods, Gomer says.
The Diabetes Plate Method is another option that uses many of the ideas from the eating patterns described above and can be a great place to start for many people with diabetes.  This method uses a 9 inch plate.  The first step for many people is to use a smaller plate than they have been eating from.  Once you have a smaller plate, the idea is to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables, ¼ of your plate with protein foods and the last ¼ of your plate with carbohydrate foods. 

The diet plan last a full week, though some only to the three days of planned meals and others do a 10-day military diet. But the experts say it's not something that anyone should be on for very long. "It's probably safe for most people for a week," said Professor Jibrin, but recommends that people shouldn't be on it for any longer. Palinski-Wade agrees: "Following a plan such as this for 3 days will most likely not lead to significant nutritient deficiencies." The author worries, however, about the overall effects. "It sets the patterns for yo-yo dieting and restrictive eating that result in weight regain as well as impairing your relationship with food."
This study included 412 adults who followed either a typical American diet or the DASH diet. The study provided all foods and beverages to participants for one month. Their daily sodium intake levels were either high, at 3,300 mg, which is similar to the current average U.S. daily sodium intake of about 3,600 mg; medium at 2,300 mg; or low at 1,500 mg.
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