Exercise is a vital part of the live-by-your-genetic-code equation. Surviving in the Stone Age meant a constant on-the-go lifestyle that probably required 4,000-plus calories a day, according to David L. Katz, MD, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. Even most people who hit the gym regularly won't need to eat that many calories, but the principle of using food as fuel to exercise still stands.
1/4 cup oats soaked overnight with 1/4 cup almond milk and 1/4 cup unsweetened yogurt is good, oats are easy to digest and soaking releases the phytates lowering the effect of the carbs. Add fresh strawberries, and a wee sprinkle of sugar-free sweetener if you need it, or a pinch of salt is nice too! 1/4 cup oats is not going to raise your blood sugar, but gives you the nutrients you need as a nursing Mum.
The contents displayed within this public group(s), such as text, graphics, and other material ("Content") are intended for educational purposes only. The Content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in a public group(s).
The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.
Carluccio, M. A., Siculella, L., Ancora, M. A., Massaro, M., Scoditti, E., Storelli, C., … & De Caterina, R. (2003, April 1). Olive oil and red wine antioxidant polyphenols inhibit endothelial activation: antiatherogenic properties of Mediterranean diet phytochemicals. Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology, 23(4), 622-629. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12615669
You have to ban all the commercial and artificial products. They did not exist fifty or sixty years ago. They are artificially hydrogenated products and derivatives, and anything suspected of containing trans-fats. In USA, it is compulsory from January 1st 2006 to show in the labels the trans-fat proportion. You should choose products with 0% of trans fats. You should consider that 0% means right up to 0.49 grams per serving. If the serving is small and you take many, you may eat a lot of these fats. They increase the bad cholesterol (LDL) and reduce the good one (HDL). Apart from other supposed negative effects.
To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says.
In 1976, Nathan Pritikin opened a centre where patients were put on programme of diet and exercise (the Pritikin Program). This diet is high on carbohydrates and fibre, with fresh fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. A study at UCLA in 2005 showed that it brought dramatic improvement to a group of people with diabetes or pre-diabetes in three weeks, so that about half no longer met the criteria for the disease.[14][15][16][17]
With this meal plan and great, super-nutritious recipes, you will not be hungry. The only problem with this diet is the expense. Carbs, it turns out, are fairly cheap (pasta, potatoes, bread), while vegetables, meat and cheese can be expensive. Every time you turn around, you will be off to the vegetable stand, but it is well worth it. On this diet, you will be well fed and your family, friends, doctor and insurance company will be impressed.

Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books
This is a guest post by Michael Joseph who is a passionate nutrition educator with a master’s degree in Nutrition Education. He is the founder of Nutrition Advance where he frequently writes nutrition and health-related articles. He believes that nutrition advice has become overly complicated and that we need to get back to the basics and value our traditional food. Photo credits go to Nutrition Advance.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.
To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says.
People who develop diabetes when they are over 40 frequently develop diabetes in part because they are overweight. Being overweight makes it more difficult for their bodies to use insulin to convert food into energy. For this reason, many patients with diabetes also have weight loss as a goal. Because each gram of fat contains 9 calories (while a gram of protein or carbohydrate contains only 4 calories), fat gram counting as a means of losing weight becomes an additional nutritional tool for many patients.
In addition, the South Beach Diet doesn’t shy away from some types of carbs: “South Beach in the long run encourages a diet that includes complex carbs — whole grains, beans, lentils, etc. — and fruits,” says Natalie Stephens, RD, at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. “If followed as originally recommended, the South Beach Diet ends up looking similar to the DASH diet: lots of vegetables, fruits, nuts, lean meats, plant-based oils (not coconut oil), and low-fat dairy. That’s actually a very science-based diet.” Stephens notes that such diets have shown health benefits like lowering cholesterol levels and lowering high blood pressure.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.
Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends.
×