“A study published in Nutrition Journal found that participants who ate foods high in monounsaturated fats for lunch (in this case, half an avocado) reported a 40 percent decreased desire to eat for hours afterward. Monounsaturated fats from sources like olive oil, nuts and avocados can reduce cholesterol, promote weight loss, even boost memory.” — David Zinczenko, author of the  Zero Belly Cookbook
Diet & Excercise: Most of what drives gain or loss is what you eat, but it is hard to function by cutting calories excessively. If you have reduced your calories to 1,200 per day, then rather than trying to reduce calories further it is better to try to increase calorie expenditure. Exercising will both make you feel better and make it easier to sleep at night.

This medically-supervised, 12-week program will help you trim your waist and lower your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Each week you'll get advice from a cardiac nurse, dietitian, exercise physiologist and a clinical psychologist. The program meets on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Call 630-527-2825 for session dates.
Potassium, magnesium, and calcium can help to serve as a counter-balance for sodium. Foods that are rich in potassium include leafy greens, most "orange" foods (oranges, sweet potatoes, carrots, melon) bananas, tomatoes, and cruciferous veggies — especially cauliflower. Low-fat dairy, plus nuts, and seeds can also help give you a bloat-busting boost. They've also been linked to a whole host of additional health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, controlling blood sugar, and reducing risk of chronic disease overall.
“If you’re feeling deprived by your diet, build in a cheat meal at least once a week in which you can indulge guilt-free. Doing this will help you avoid viewing certain foods as ‘off limits,’ which will help you crave them less.” — David Zinczenko, author of  Zero Belly Cookbook: 150+ Delicious Recipes to Flatten Your Belly, Turn Off Your Fat Genes, and Help Keep You Lean for Life!
CBN.com According to Eat This Not That, Americans are busy, especially during the holiday season.  Many people head out for fast food while shopping at the mall or while taking a break from decorating.  Matt says we need to make wise choices when eating out.  While one in every four meals is eaten on the road at a restaurant or drive-thru, we can still enjoy our favorite foods without suffering the consequences. 
Long-term maintenance of the lost body weight can be described as a success. Although meal replacement has beneficial effects on weight loss, it cannot guarantee weight maintenance. Healthy diets recommend low carbohydrate, low GI, and moderate fat foods, but it is not clear whether they are useful in preventing weight gain. It seems that consuming fewer calories helps people to maintain the weight loss. Some special behaviors are also associated with better weight loss maintenance. Consuming a lower amount of sugar sweetened beverages, not being awake late at night, and consuming more healthy foods are some examples of such behaviors. No special food can definitely promote weight maintenance. Therefore, there is a necessity to develop further research to find strategies in obesity management, focusing on the successful maintenance of weight loss.
Fancy coffee drinks from trendy coffee joints often pack several hundred calories, thanks to whole milk, whipped cream, sugar, and sugary syrups. A cup of regular coffee with skim milk has just a small fraction of those calories. And when brewed with good beans, it tastes just as great. You can also try nonfat powdered milk in coffee. You’ll get the nutritional benefits of skim milk, which is high in calcium and low in calories. And, because the water has been removed, powdered milk doesn’t dilute the coffee the way skim milk does. Here are 11 metabolism myths you have to stop believing.
“Before you begin to change your diet, spend a week recording everything you eat—and I mean everything. Before I made any changes to my diet, I journaled everything I ate each day for a week, including little things like gum or breath mints. If you have a piece of candy from your coworker’s desk, snag a few spoonfuls of your boyfriend’s ice cream, or finish the few bits of grilled cheese your kid left on her plate, write it down! It all adds up, and you just don’t realize how much you’re eating until you actually see it all on paper in front of you. I, for one, was stunned.” — Maria Menounos, author of  The Everygirl’s Guide to Diet and Fitness, on how she lost 40 pounds
“A study published in Nutrition Journal found that participants who ate foods high in monounsaturated fats for lunch (in this case, half an avocado) reported a 40 percent decreased desire to eat for hours afterward. Monounsaturated fats from sources like olive oil, nuts and avocados can reduce cholesterol, promote weight loss, even boost memory.” — David Zinczenko, author of the  Zero Belly Cookbook
An iPhone application Eat This, Not That! The Game became the number one application in the Healthcare & Fitness category and number ten across the entire collection of free applications available in the iTunes Store in 2010. A quarterly magazine, Eat This, Not That!, was launched in 2015, and is distributed by Meredith in 80,000 sites nationwide.[2]

If a weight-loss program is not enough to help you reach a healthy weight, ask your health care professional about other types of weight-loss treatments. Prescription medicines to treat overweight and obesity, combined with healthy lifestyle changes, may help some people reach a healthy weight. For some people who have extreme obesity, bariatric surgery may be an option.
Now you know that your dinnertime TV show and dishware affect how much you eat—but did you know that your environment has an even greater impact on your noshing habits? The typical American buys and eats more than 80 percent of their food within five miles of their homes—a.k.a. your food radius—according to Brian Wansink, Ph.D., director of Cornell University's Food and Brand Lab. In his book, Slim By Design: Mindless Eating Solutions, Wansink talks about various studies he's done over the course of his research career that show how your food environment dictates your eating habits.
One easy trick if you're a pasta fan is to swap out white pasta for the wonderfully named courgetti (spaghetti made from spiralizing courgette). You’ll hardly notice the difference when you’re eating it, but you’ll be fuller for longer despite consuming fewer calories. When you consume fewer calories, your body can go to your fat reserves for energy, rather than just burning off the food you’ve eaten.  
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