Weight Watchers is a household name for the majority of Americans. Why? Because it works. In fact, the U.S News and World Report named this the best weight-loss diet for 2016 in their annual rankings — and with good reason. The balanced program lets you eat what you want, track your choices via a points system, and build a weight loss support network with fellow Weight Watchers' members.
At the same time, wearing clothes you can actually move in (read: not stilettos and a tiny pencil skirt) to work might help keep you active during the day instead of parked at your desk. A study by the American Council on Exercise found that people took an average of eight percent more steps on days that they wore jeans instead of conventional business clothes. You officially have a health excuse to ask for casual Friday every day.

Published in November 2009, this restaurant guide summarizes the best and worst meal choices at popular restaurants, hotel buffets, convenience stores, movie theaters, vending machines, and airport and amusement-park eateries. This restaurant survival guide breaks down each best and worst meal selection by calories, fat, sugar, and/or sodium. Extra points are given to foods that are high in protein and fiber. The book decodes restaurant menus of different cuisines—Japanese, barbecue, Chinese, deli—identifying popular dishes, and providing tips on what to order.
Find an activity that is enjoyable. If additional health problems also accompany overweight or obesity, consult with a medical professional before beginning an exercise program. Start slowly, and then work up to at least three to five 30 minute sessions of moderate exercise per week, or three to five 15 minute sessions of vigorous exercise per week. Strengthening exercises such as sit-ups or weight lifting should also be incorporated two days per week.
Excellent ideas in this book. The theory behind Eat This, Not That is a lifestyle change--instead of going on a diet, you tweak your diet to consume more of what's good for you (protein, fiber, and healthy fats being the big 3 to watch) and less of what's not (namely bad fat and empty calories). And you don't have to give up the foods you love, or even go hungry. Instead of severely limiting your calories, you just eat nutritionally dense foods, which have fewer calories overall anyway. So you f ...more
Published in December 2009, this recipe book provides meal ideas for breakfast, appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, barbecue, traditional American dishes, international cuisine, snacks, and desserts. Each recipe supplies a breakdown of the nutritional information, serving size, and cost per dish. The homemade recipes' calories are compared to a chain-restaurant's version of each meal, showing a stark difference not only in nutrition, but in price. For mid-afternoon hunger pangs, this book offers a snack matrix of healthy choices (i.e. black bean chips and hummus).[3]
Giancoli also recommends finding a diet that fits in with how you really live. She notes that if you enjoy going out to eat but try to commit to a diet that forbids you from ever going to a restaurant, you’re just going to cheat. “It’s not sustainable… You’re most likely going to have a healthier meal if you’re going to cook yourself, but you’re depriving yourself of that social interaction if you never go out.” To put it another way: Your eating practices shouldn’t isolate you or keep you from having fun.
“It’s far more difficult to eat a healthier diet and fit in exercise if you don’t plan ahead. Plan out your meals for the week ahead and go grocery shopping over the weekend to ensure you have the ingredients you need on hand. If you can, do some meal prep in your down time—cut fresh veggies, marinate your protein, cook up a batch of whole grains in advance. When you’re prepared you’re far less likely to order takeout. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
This book is terrible. I read this book during a slow day at the bookstore where I work, and I was disgusted. A book that suggests you can lose weight by making the giant lifestyle decision to eat a Big Mac instead of a Whopper is mostly likely authored by Satan. It also offers genius advice on which entree at Chipotle packs the least calories, as well as the healthiest menu item at TGI Friday's.
Spoon Guru nutritionist Isabel Butler (MSc, ANutr) recommends that “the best way to reduce weight and maintain the weight loss is by simply eating a balanced and healthy diet, without refusing yourself particular foods… If you do cut out foods, you need to make sure your diet is still balanced and you are getting the nutrients your body needs from other sources.”  
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