From the editors of the bestselling series Eat This, Not That! comes a unique diet program that strips away added sugars and melts fat — from your belly first. The trick: A series of simple swaps that will ensure you’re eating the very best options from your favorite restaurants and grocery store brands. Discover how easy it is to indulge your way to a flat belly while protecting your brain and striking a blow against heart disease, diabetes and more.

“There are many foods that aid weight loss, but one that I often recommend to my clients and eat myself is grapefruit. Researchers at Scripps Clinic in San Diego found that when obese people ate half a grapefruit before each meal, they dropped an average of 3.5 pounds over 12 weeks. Apparently, the tangy fruit can lower insulin, a fat-storage hormone, and that can lead to weight loss. Plus, since it’s at least 90% water, it can fill you up so you eat less. However, if you are on certain medications you should not have grapefruit or grapefruit juice, so check the label on all your prescriptions, or ask your pharmacist or doctor. — Patricia Bannan, MS, RDN, author of  Eat Right When Time is Tight.
CBN.com According to Eat This Not That, Americans are busy, especially during the holiday season.  Many people head out for fast food while shopping at the mall or while taking a break from decorating.  Matt says we need to make wise choices when eating out.  While one in every four meals is eaten on the road at a restaurant or drive-thru, we can still enjoy our favorite foods without suffering the consequences.  The economics of the restaurant business are so different than any other business.  Restaurants don’t abide by the same rules that grocery stores do, because there are no labels that indicate fat, calories, sodium, etc. Matt says many Americans eat like they shop.  We are “shopping for calories to stuff into” our bodies’ closets.
Published in May 2010, this book exposes drinks with high concentration of sugar, and schools readers on smarter choices for their favored drinking habits—whether it be a Starbucks run, a night out at a bar, or a post-workout beverage. This book spills the nutritional information on beverages sold at supermarkets, restaurants, fast-food chains, and liquor stores.

You already know that a perfect diet doesn't exist, but many of us still can't resist the urge to kick ourselves when we indulge, eat too much, or get thrown off course from restrictive diets. The problem: This only makes it more difficult, stressful, and downright impossible to lose weight. So rather than beating yourself up for eating foods you think you shouldn't, let it go. Treating yourself to about 200 calories worth of deliciousness each day — something that feels indulgent to you — can help you stay on track for the long-haul, so allow yourself to eat, breathe, and indulge. Food should be joyful, not agonizing!


Unintentional weight loss can occur because of an inadequately nutritious diet relative to a person's energy needs (generally called malnutrition). Disease processes, changes in metabolism, hormonal changes, medications or other treatments, disease- or treatment-related dietary changes, or reduced appetite associated with a disease or treatment can also cause unintentional weight loss.[26][27][28][32][33][34] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy.[28]
“Research continues to support the role of a high-protein diet and weight loss, however, we don’t want to reach those protein needs exclusively with animal proteins. Plant proteins found in beans not only help us feel full and stabilize blood sugar but beans are associated with longevity. Who cares about being skinny if you die young?” —Jennifer McDaniel, MS, RDN, CSSD, LD, food and nutrition expert

Keep in mind that a number on a scale won't give you the full picture. The scale does not discriminate between fat and muscle, nor will it tell you about the health of your heart or your increased endurance. If you are burning fat while gaining muscle, your weight may not change. Instead of giving up, consider non-weight-related goals, such as how many laps you can swim in one go.
Talking with a health care professional about your weight is an important first step. Sometimes, health care professionals may not address issues such as healthy eating, physical activity, and weight during general office visits. You may need to raise these issues yourself. If you feel uneasy talking about your weight, bring your questions with you and practice talking about your concerns before your office visit. Aim to work with your health care professional to improve your health.
Published in June 2009, the fourth book addresses popular American foods, and lists the best and worst dishes available at chain restaurants. The book guides readers through various restaurants, cuisines and foods with 24 chapters covering topics such as "Best (& Worst) Foods in America”, "Best (& Worst) Pizzas in America," "Best (& Worst) Drinks in America," and "Best (& Worst) Foods for Your Blood Pressure."
Fitness-focused exercise also improves your strength and endurance, which makes activities of all kinds easier, and thus encourages you to be more active overall. And, since regular exercise also improves your energy level, confidence, emotional outlook, and self-esteem, it can help you get through weight-loss plateaus, when you’re not seeing the inches melt off as quickly as you’d like.
Weight-loss programs are usually run by a commercial business or organization that provides weight-loss guidance. These programs may be run by a one individual, a gym, or a nationwide service. They may also sell products to accompany their program which may include exercise equipment, workout DVDs, or food and beverage items. Ideally, an effective weight-loss program should include guidance in maintaining a healthy weight after the weight-loss phase is over. The program should teach skills that help improve dietary habits, increase physical activity, and help change lifestyle habits- with an ultimate goal of long-term weight maintenance.
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
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