The original ETNT was reviewed by Tara Parker-Pope of The New York Times Well Blog writes, “The comparisons are always interesting and often surprising.” Though critics don’t love every comparison. Parker-Pope went on to write, “Chances are you won’t agree with every item. For instance, in a comparison of choices for a child’s Easter basket, I can’t figure out why Jelly Belly Jelly Beans, with 150 calories (630 kJ), are an ‘eat this,’ while Marshmallow Peeps, with 140 calories (590 kJ), are a ‘not that.’”[4]
One of methods that have been used a lot for preventing weight gain is meal replacement. It is safe, efficient, cost-effective, and without any side effects.[3,15] In this method the level of compliance is better, the receipt of nutrient intake is sufficient, and the drop-out rate is low.[15,16] The calorie density of these meals is controlled and they are also nutrient-dense. Main meals and snacks can be replaced by these nutritionally balanced low-fat meals. Table 1 shows the meal replacement trials for weight maintenance.
Your age, gender and body mass index (BMI) determine your “basal metabolic rate,” or how many calories you need each day to stay at your current weight. You need to burn 3,500 calories more than you take in to lose one pound (.45 kilograms). So subtract 500 calories each day from your base rate for a daily calorie goal that helps you lose about a pound a week.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AKA the top nutrition authority in America) released a revised paper this year saying that both vegetarian and vegan diets are best for people's health as well as the environment. If you're not ready to make a complete shift to meatless and cheese-less, consider "part-time" vegan and vegetarian plans, where you eat mostly plant-based at breakfast and lunch or on weekdays, and then eat fish, meat, dairy, and eggs only during designated times.


Even if you manage to meet your goal, it probably won’t be sustainable: “The amount of restriction required will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct,” Dr. Seltzer says. What’s more, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, he adds.
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