When you've finally reached your goal and size, it can be tempting to throw your scale at the garbage and never look at it again. That scale, however, is essential to keeping excess body mass off once you've gone through all the hard work to lose it. While maintaining your weight, you need to be aware of how much you actually weigh. Pick a day of the week and weigh yourself every morning on that day. Write it down. This way, you're aware if you've gained any back and can curb it before it snowballs into anything serious.
Suzanne Hiscock is a PN1 Nutrition Coach, ACE-certified Health Coach, as well as an ACE-certified Fitness Nutrition Specialist. For over 16 years, she has been helping people lose weight and get fit through her website, FitWatch.com. Whether it's with one-on-one nutrition coaching, nutrition programs or courses, and tools or calculators, she can help you to eat better, move more and believe in yourself.
Cancer Risk – General good health helps the body beat back harmful influences, including cancer.  Studies show that obesity enhances cancer risk, especially among women.  Hormones produced by fat may be responsible for increased breast cancer risk, as well as other forms of cancer impacting women.  Estrogen responds to lost weight, reducing the amount produced.  There is also reason to believe women suffering from cancer recover faster at optimal weights, than women carrying extra pounds.  The two-fold benefit provides powerful incentives for losing excess fat.
Losing weight and eating healthy foods go hand-in-hand, and if most of your grocery store purchases are prepackaged or prepared foods, you might be consuming food additives that aren't doing your waistline any favors. The best way to avoid this is to stick to as many whole, unprepared ingredients as possible and to cook your food at home. That way, you know what's going into your meals.
Counseling and community: Think about whether you need one-on-one guidance from an expert or a supportive diet-related community to succeed on a weight loss program. Some people prefer to go it alone or involve their friends or family rather than a forum, but others enjoy finding acceptance and encouragement from others who are using the same program.

Swap giant dinner plates, bowls, and silverware for smaller versions, and pick up portion-sized packages of snacks instead of nomming straight from a full-size box or bag, says Cerderquist. You'll be eating less without even thinking about it. Another pro tip: stay away from protein bars. "It is amazing to see that an entire well-balanced meal can have the same amount of calories as many protein bars," she says. "But you are much more satisfied when having the variety of textures and flavors from a real meal."
Meal replacement has been used for weight loss as a successful strategy.[47] Its advantages are, easier adherence, reduced food choices, as well as controlled calorie and nutrient content, but it may be boring for a long period.[3,4] Nevertheless, its effectiveness in weight maintenance is a subject under discussion. It can be the consequence of a different macronutrient composition or the number of meals that were replaced.
Carb crazy? Consider this: Refined carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and rice, create a surge in insulin that in turn drives down your resting metabolic rate, explains Aronne. "It's important to keep carbohydrates in your diet, but really focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which have less of an effect on insulin levels," he explains. And when buying whole-grain breads and cereals, make sure the first ingredient listed is whole wheat, whole oat or cracked wheat.
Fitness-focused exercise also improves your strength and endurance, which makes activities of all kinds easier, and thus encourages you to be more active overall. And, since regular exercise also improves your energy level, confidence, emotional outlook, and self-esteem, it can help you get through weight-loss plateaus, when you’re not seeing the inches melt off as quickly as you’d like.
I've read lots of diet books over the years. I can spout the downfalls of Atkins and South Beach Diet in my sleep, and there was a two-month period in my early 20s that I ate pretty much nothing but rice and steamed vegetables. But diets like that aren't practical, especially when you're a working mother also trying to sneak healthful foods in on two preschoolers, and trying to omit food dyes and boost omega 3 foods for the kiddo with ADHD.
Reading ingredients and preparing food at home might seem exhausting, and it isn't easy at first to adjust. Many have lost temporarily on fad diets, and it may be tempting to buy diet food instead of preparing your own. However, fad diets are focused on quick weight loss, not long-term solutions and health management, so many people gain back everything they lost (and more!) when the diet is over. You also may be causing holes in your nutrition by cutting out certain foods completely without ensuring that you replace the vitamins elsewhere. Getting healthy and staying slim is a lifestyle change, and fad diets just don't cut it.
I'm a huge fan of Eat This, Not That... well, I'm not exactly huge (anymore that is)... Ya see, I've... dropped some 46 pounds about eight years ago and have kept it off. I can honestly say that my life changed when I began to change my thinking and behaviors. "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was a Hippocrates quotation and that dude was right on. I was diagnosed as Type II Diabetes and even with those ups and downs and challenges, the nutritional education and inspiration and motivation from ETNT was responsible for keeping my mind, body and soul together all of these years. I am not sure if it was an accident or an omen that I ran across the first "Eat This, Not That" book at my local library back in 2008... wow... 10 years ago? Since then I have bought every edition for my "keeper" collection and now a subscriber to the ETNT magazine. The second issue (Fall 2018) just arrived today in my mailbox. Thumbs up for another awesome edition of an awesome magazine... For those of you new to this group or new to the concept, WELCOME! To the Eat This, Not That authors and editors, THANK YOU!!! Ray Tetreault, Cleveland Ohio. See More
For starters, we can forget about finding instant fixes and miracle cures for what are essentially pathological lifestyle habits. “We must stop falling for the myths that keep us fat and perpetuate an endless cycle of weight loss and gain,” says Mark Hyman, MD, best-selling author of The Blood Sugar Solution and other books, and medical director of the Center for Functional Medicine at Cleveland Clinic.
To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
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