Researchers from the University of Cambridge looked at 72 studies and found that people consistently consume more food and drink when they are offered larger-sized portions, packages, or tableware than when offered smaller-sized versions. The data suggested that if larger portions and tableware were eliminated throughout the diet, Americans could save about 527 calories per day—that adds up to more than 3,500 calories a week or one pound. Translation: this could be undermining your weight loss or actually causing you to gain weight. 

Nutrisystem is so accessible, you can even grab it at your local Walmart. There are a few different plans to choose from, but each of them has you eating 4 to 5 times a day — and every meal and snack is high-protein, high-fiber, and contains zero trans fat, MSG, or artificial preservatives. Those who use this diet are said to lose an average of 1 to 2 pounds per week.
Diet “dictocrats” have been pointing out the evils of fat for so long that many of us can’t indulge in anything beyond low-fat yogurt without guilt. But avoiding fat is a huge mistake, says journalist Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise. In fact, taking in an adequate supply of healthy fats is essential to proper body composition, whole-body health, and long-term weight management.
Being fit gives you a distinct metabolic advantage at a cellular level. Fit people have a greater number of mitochondria — the energy factories within our cells. Mitochondria handle the aerobic oxidation of fatty acids (fat burning!) that occurs even when we’re at rest. Thus, increasing the number of mitochondria through exercise helps raise our metabolism so we burn more calories — not only with every workout session, but also when we’re not exercising at all.
Another product intended for weightloss is powdered beverage formulas or shakes- often mixed with a glass of milk and substituted for one or more meals. Those who consume these beverages may lose weight initially, though it is usually regained once the beverages are discontinued. By relying on shakes instead of whole foods, dieters follow artificial dieting methods and avoid learning how to incorporate healthy food choices into their lives.
Think of finding the right diet as akin to going on a long road trip. The more tools and guidance you have on your journey, the smoother your trip will be. Losing weight is a journey, not a destination, and along the way you'll learn a lot about yourself. Everyone wants to get there now, but what you'll discover along the way can ultimately be more fulfilling, rewarding, and even enjoyable. Finding the right weight-loss plan takes work and investment, and I hope I've helped simplify the process somewhat.
My Calorie Counter is powered by EverydayHealth, and it’s hard to separate the two. My Calorie Counter provides a set of tools which allows you to track and monitor your nutritional intake each day, building meal plans and recording your weight. It produces varied diets for your nutritional needs, showing you precisely how many calories you have left remaining each day. What’s more, it’s...
Carb crazy? Consider this: Refined carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and rice, create a surge in insulin that in turn drives down your resting metabolic rate, explains Aronne. "It's important to keep carbohydrates in your diet, but really focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which have less of an effect on insulin levels," he explains. And when buying whole-grain breads and cereals, make sure the first ingredient listed is whole wheat, whole oat or cracked wheat.
Unintentional weight loss can occur because of an inadequately nutritious diet relative to a person's energy needs (generally called malnutrition). Disease processes, changes in metabolism, hormonal changes, medications or other treatments, disease- or treatment-related dietary changes, or reduced appetite associated with a disease or treatment can also cause unintentional weight loss.[26][27][28][32][33][34] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy.[28]
Gastrointestinal disorders are another common cause of unexplained weight loss – in fact they are the most common non-cancerous cause of idiopathic weight loss.[citation needed] Possible gastrointestinal etiologies of unexplained weight loss include: celiac disease, peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease (crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), pancreatitis, gastritis, diarrhea and many other GI conditions.

I'm a huge fan of Eat This, Not That... well, I'm not exactly huge (anymore that is)... Ya see, I've... dropped some 46 pounds about eight years ago and have kept it off. I can honestly say that my life changed when I began to change my thinking and behaviors. "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was a Hippocrates quotation and that dude was right on. I was diagnosed as Type II Diabetes and even with those ups and downs and challenges, the nutritional education and inspiration and motivation from ETNT was responsible for keeping my mind, body and soul together all of these years. I am not sure if it was an accident or an omen that I ran across the first "Eat This, Not That" book at my local library back in 2008... wow... 10 years ago? Since then I have bought every edition for my "keeper" collection and now a subscriber to the ETNT magazine. The second issue (Fall 2018) just arrived today in my mailbox. Thumbs up for another awesome edition of an awesome magazine... For those of you new to this group or new to the concept, WELCOME! To the Eat This, Not That authors and editors, THANK YOU!!! Ray Tetreault, Cleveland Ohio. See More


Real talk: It could take weeks or months to see the metabolic effects of exercise on the scale, and even then, building muscle, which is denser than body fat, could lead to weight gain. “Do what you like because it’s good for you,” Dr. Seltzer says, noting the way exercise is awesome for your heart, mental health, and more—and that not all measure of progress can be seen on the scale.
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