Sure, there's your one friend who swears by the Taco Cleanse. And that other friend who ate nothing but broccoli soup for a month and dropped 20 pounds, found the love of her life, and got promoted at work. But before you start blending 80 stalks of broccoli into a cup or crunching your way through a crate of tacos, check out which diets are backed by science. Because don't you want to try one that will do the trick for you?
After you've settled into the workout routine, and the excitement of those first ten pounds has worn off, your challenge will be keeping yourself from plateauing. If you're getting bored with your exercise or feeling frustration that your body mass has hit a plateau, don't start skipping the gym. If anything, substitute the physical activity. Go to the park. Take a martial arts class. Spend an afternoon kayaking with your friends. Dance or play basketball. Working out doesn't have to be boring, and when you feel that fatigue, it's time to change things up a little. Plus, finding your exercise in an alternate venue will take your mind off losing and put you in the mood for some fun.
You’ve heard of a self-fulfilling prophecy? If you keep focusing on things you can’t do, like resisting junk food or getting out the door for a daily walk, chances are you won’t do them. Instead (whether you believe it or not) repeat positive thoughts to yourself. “I can lose weight.” “I will get out for my walk today.” “I know I can resist the pastry cart after dinner.” Repeat these phrases and before too long, they will become true for you.
We know, you've probably heard these a thousand times. But if you can make these small swaps day-to-day, you'll spare enough calories for the treat foods you really want or to go into a calorie deficit (a.k.a. the key to weight loss). (And this is just the tip of the iceberg. We have 50 more easy ways to cut calories.) Making these simple swaps is the way to health-ify your eating style and lose weight without actually dieting. 
Northwestern Medicine has joined the mix with FoodSwitch, which dubs itself “a nutritionist whispering in your ear.” As you grocery shop, the app allows you to scan an item’s bar code, pull up nutrition facts such as saturated fat, sugar, sodium and energy, and get its health rating based on a five-star scale. Finally, FoodSwitch will suggest healthier alternatives from its database of more than 268,000 products.

This may at first seem counter-intuitive, but don't skip meals. When you skip a meal, you're likely to eat more later because of how hungry you become. Instead, make sure you eat at least three meals a day, and try not to go more than five hours between meals. Some people have more luck eating smaller meals throughout the day, but you have to be careful with this trick. It's not an excuse to eat a full meal five times instead of three times a day. Instead, you eat very small portions of healthful foods every few hours to keep yourself from getting hungry and grabbing a bad-for-you snack.
Nutrition Counseling - working with a trained nutritional expert, you can identify ways to modify your diet, whether it's to control a chronic illness like diabetes, or simply to shed a few pounds. Save 20% off counseling services through Healthy Alternatives. (Call member services at 1-800-251-7722 to find a Health Alternatives provider near you.) To receive the discount, just present your ID card at the time of appointment.
Loads of research demonstrates people who log everything they eat — especially those who log while they're eating — are more likely to lose weight and keep it off for the long-haul. Start tracking on an app like MyFitnessPal when the pounds start sneaking up on you. It'll help you stay accountable for what you've eaten. Plus, you can easily identify some other areas of your daily eats that could use a little improvement when it's written out in front of you.
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[2] Jensen MD, Ryan DH, Apovian CM, et al. 2013 AHA/ACC/TOS guideline for the management of overweight and obesity in adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines and The Obesity Society. Circulation. 2014;129(25 Suppl 2):S102–S138. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2013/11/11/01.cir.0000437739.71477.ee. Accessed July 6, 2017.
To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
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