I got this (well, actually the 2011 version) for my boss who eats at Hooters like everyday and wants to lose his potbelly but refuses to give up junky food. A lot of it's the lesser of two evils, so if you're super jonzing for some fries and you want to TRY to be good, you'll learn that KFC's wedges are actually pretty sensible. It also has a sweet grocery guide where it's not the lesser of two evils, but the better choice, period, arming you for smarter shopping. I started reading it and was so ...more


Published in December 2008, the Supermarket Survival Guide addresses grocery-store, food shopping, and using the format of swapping out one unhealthy product for a better one. It provides label decoders (defining claims like "free range" or "organic") and nutritional values on all the various areas of the supermarket (such as the produce section, meat counter, and cereal aisles). A shopper can use this book to filter through the multiple brand choices, and discern what product—whether it be deli meat or sandwich bread—is the healthiest option.
Next, you'll be asked about your goals. It's important to be realistic during this step. Your goal weight may be different than an ideal weight or a perfect weight. For example, you may want to weigh 120 pounds. But if you have struggled with your weight for most of your life and have never been lower than 150 pounds, then 120 may not be realistic at this time. Try to set a goal that you believe to be attainable. Once you reach your goal, you can always set a new one.
You may say you want to lose weight to feel good about yourself. “Why?” Noom asks again. “It’s like peeling back the layers of an onion,” Noom explains, “And yes, tears might be involved too!” By the time our tester answered the third “Why?” she had indeed gone deep — even in the guise of a 40-year-old mom. The ultimate Why she came up with: “To enjoy life and bring joy to others.”
Some factors that influence the number of calories a person needs to remain healthy include age, weight, height, sex, levels of physical activity, and overall general health. For example, a physically active 25-year-old male that is 6 feet in height requires considerably higher calorie intake than a 5-foot-tall, sedentary 70-year-old woman. Though it differs depending on age and activity level, adult males generally require 2,000-3000 calories per day to maintain weight while adult females need around 1,600-2,400 according to the U.S Department of Health.
“Whether it’s an app or paper food logs, tracking what you eat will certainly be eye-opening. Almost everyone consumes more than they think. Write everything down as soon as you’re done eating so you don’t forget anything. The simple act of recording what you eat will make you eat less. When the calories are in your face, it makes you think twice!” — Martha McKittrick, RD, CDE
“If a client has come to me looking to lose 10 pounds, I would tell them to simply move. Move more, and more often. Walk or bike ride to class or work, even park further away from your location in the parking lot. Take the stairs or take a walk during lunch. You don’t have to spend hours every day in the gym sweating, but you do have to make a conscious effort to move more, and sit less. This works great because it doesn’t feel like work and you’re burning more and more calories throughout the day.” — Ajia Cherry, personal trainer and Founder at Functional Innovative Training
The truth is that casual dining restaurants have higher calorie meals than the much-maligned fast food joints. While the fast food restaurants are now required to publish calorie, fat, and sodium contents, the casual restaurants have been quietly fighting against requiring them to release the same information. Thanks to this book and the research behind it, we can now get a better idea of what we've been eating at these restaurants. And it is eye opening.
In other words? “Drinking makes you more likely to eat sh*t,” Dr. Seltzer says, referring to drunk foods. At the same time, he stops short of asking patients to quit alcohol cold-turkey to lose weight. Plus, research suggests you don’t have to, as long as your intake is moderate—i.e., less than about a drink a day. “If you drink a glass of wine every night and notice you eat more afterward, eat less early to account for this,” he says. “Or, if you’re drinking four glasses of wine a week, drink three instead so you’ll won’t feel such a big difference.”
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