To identify studies regarding weight maintenance, with an emphasis on dietary interventions, a complete search of articles was carried out by using PubMed and SCOPUS. The studies were restricted to those in English. The key words included ‘overweight’, ‘obesity’, ‘weight maintenance’, ‘weight regain’, and ‘diet therapy’. Articles from 1974 to 2013 were included. We found 75 articles. We excluded studies published only as abstracts and those involving behavioral therapy or exercise per se. Finally we evaluated 26 studies.

Starchy veggies (like potatoes) and processed whole grains (like whole-wheat bread) are foods I’d normally recommend eating in moderation, since they provide plenty of nutrients, fiber, and healthy carbs. However, high-carb foods aren’t your best friend when you’re looking to drop water weight. Essentially, when your body stores excess carbs, it stores them with water. So replacing carb-heavy foods with non-starchy veggies that still provide filling fiber without as much water retention is the way to go. For a week before your event, you can swap out the starchy carbs for more non-starchy vegetables to lose some water weight. (These are 10 things experts wish you knew about water weight.)
Tracking calories also puts exercise in a quantifiable perspective, increasing a person's awareness regarding how much exercise is really required to counteract a 220-calorie bag of M&M's. Once a link is made between the amount of exercise that some snack equates to, many people find abstaining from that bag of chips to be the preferred option rather than performing an equivalent amount of exercise – which can lead to healthier eating habits.
The truth is that casual dining restaurants have higher calorie meals than the much-maligned fast food joints. While the fast food restaurants are now required to publish calorie, fat, and sodium contents, the casual restaurants have been quietly fighting against requiring them to release the same information. Thanks to this book and the research behind it, we can now get a better idea of what we've been eating at these restaurants. And it is eye opening.

Snacking can be a gray area for weight loss. Really think about whether a snack is necessary before eating it. A low-calorie snack can be a good option before or after a work out or if you're feeling very hungry and there's more than two hours until your next meal.[11] To keep your metabolism moving and keep yourself full, you should be eating every three to four hours. That might mean multiple small meals or three meals with snacks in between.
Firstly, your breakfast should be healthy. Grabbing a high-calorie sugar-smothered coffee drink or a couple of donuts won't do anything for maintaining your body mass and will probably send you back in the other direction. Focus on sources of proteins, vitamins, and minerals. The purpose of eating a good breakfast is to provide your body with the fuel it needs to get through the day and to prevent you from experiencing cravings later in the morning before lunch.
Is the egg diet effective? There are several versions of the egg diet, all of which involve eating eggs as the main source of protein and restricting other foods. Eggs contain many nutrients, and the diet may help people lose weight. However, they contain no fiber, and they can be high in cholesterol. Find out more about the pros and cons. Read now
There is some scientific legitimacy to today’s lower-carb diets: Large amounts of simple carbohydrates from white flour and added sugar can wreak havoc on your blood sugar and lead to weight gain. While avoiding sugar, white rice, and white flour, however, you should eat plenty of whole-grain breads and brown rice. One Harvard study of 74,000 women found that those who ate more than two daily servings of whole grains were 49 percent less likely to be overweight than those who ate the white stuff. Eating whole grains is not only one of many great ways to lose weight; it can also make you smarter.
[1] Fryar CD, Carroll MD, and Ogden CL. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and extreme obesity among adults aged 20 and over: United States, 1960–1962 through 2013–2014. National Center for Health Statistics. Health E-Stats. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_adult_13_14/obesity_adult_13_14.pdf. (PDF, 341 KB) Published July 2016. Accessed July 6, 2017.
“It’s far more difficult to eat a healthier diet and fit in exercise if you don’t plan ahead. Plan out your meals for the week ahead and go grocery shopping over the weekend to ensure you have the ingredients you need on hand. If you can, do some meal prep in your down time—cut fresh veggies, marinate your protein, cook up a batch of whole grains in advance. When you’re prepared you’re far less likely to order takeout. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
Grazing is a surprisingly good idea because it helps you avoid metabolic slowdown. "Your body will be tricked into thinking it's constantly eating, so it will never slow your metabolism down," explains Bauer. Aim for five small meals (200 to 500 calories) a day rather than three large ones. Also try not to go more than four hours without eating — if you eat breakfast at 7am, for example, have a snack at 10am, lunch at noon, another snack at 3pm and dinner at 7pm.
There are a number of popular activity trackers like the Fitbit which can help you lose by automatically recording your steps & exercise activity and displaying them on an onlinine profile. People can share their data with friends and make a game of setting daily or weekly goals and competing with one another at work or in other social environments.
Excellent ideas in this book. The theory behind Eat This, Not That is a lifestyle change--instead of going on a diet, you tweak your diet to consume more of what's good for you (protein, fiber, and healthy fats being the big 3 to watch) and less of what's not (namely bad fat and empty calories). And you don't have to give up the foods you love, or even go hungry. Instead of severely limiting your calories, you just eat nutritionally dense foods, which have fewer calories overall anyway. So you f ...more

The Google team looked at all their search data for 2016 to see what emerged as the top diet trends, and this buzzy acronym diet secured the top spot. Unlike most diets, it swaps counting calories for focusing on insulin levels — a measurement of your blood sugar that nutritionists love to zoom in on when evaluating a food's health merits — to ensure steady, lasting weight loss.

The franchise makes recommendations about food choices with the aim of improving health. Criteria for unhealthy dishes center on high levels of calories, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and/or sugar content. The healthier alternatives often include higher levels of fiber and/or protein. The franchise brands itself as the "no-diet weight loss solution." As of October 2012, the ETNT franchise has sold more than 8 million copies.
Green tea isn't known only for its cancer-fighting benefits: It may help boost your metabolism, too. People who took green-tea extract three times a day saw their metabolic rate increase by about 4 percent, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (Translation: You could burn an extra 60 calories a day, which equals about six pounds a year!) It may be because green tea contains catechins, which increase levels of the metabolism-speeding brain chemical norepinephrine, says Joy Bauer, a New York City nutritionist and author of Cooking with Joy.
The main sources of calories in a typical person's diet are carbohydrates, proteins, and fat, with alcohol also being a significant portion of calorie intake for many people (though ideally this should be limited since alcohol contains many empty calories). Some studies have shown that the calories displayed on nutrition labels and the calories actually consumed and retained can vary significantly. This hints at the complex nature of calories and nutrition and is why many conflicting points of view on the "best" methodology for losing weight exist. For example, how a person chews their food has been shown to affect weight loss to some degree; generally speaking, chewing food more increases the number of calories that the body burns during digestion. People that chew more also tend to eat less, since the longer period of time necessary to chew their food allows more time to reach a state of satiety, which results in eating less. However, the effects of how food is chewed and digestion of different foods are not completely understood and it is possible that other factors exist, and thus this information should be taken with a grain of salt (in moderation if weight loss is the goal).
In other words? “Drinking makes you more likely to eat sh*t,” Dr. Seltzer says, referring to drunk foods. At the same time, he stops short of asking patients to quit alcohol cold-turkey to lose weight. Plus, research suggests you don’t have to, as long as your intake is moderate—i.e., less than about a drink a day. “If you drink a glass of wine every night and notice you eat more afterward, eat less early to account for this,” he says. “Or, if you’re drinking four glasses of wine a week, drink three instead so you’ll won’t feel such a big difference.”
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