I borrowed this from a friend and the premise is interesting. I suppose if you eat this kind of stuff everyday making the change from "God-awful" to not quite as bad is definitely a step in the right direction. And I know people who do eat this stuff all the time. I try to be a bit smarter than that, but it's good to know what things might take a little longer to kill me when I decide to hit the fast food drive thru!
Matt says many Americans eat like they shop.  We are “shopping for calories to stuff into” our bodies’ closets. “What we are buying when we eat at a restaurant is fat, calories and sodium. More is not a bargain, not by a long shot,” says Matt.  Portions are oversized, fattier and more unhealthy than ever.  Even though there are calorie-dense items on the menus of America’s restaurants, Matt says there are tons of delicious ways to cut hundreds, even thousands, of calories from your daily diet. 
Excellent ideas in this book. The theory behind Eat This, Not That is a lifestyle change--instead of going on a diet, you tweak your diet to consume more of what's good for you (protein, fiber, and healthy fats being the big 3 to watch) and less of what's not (namely bad fat and empty calories). And you don't have to give up the foods you love, or even go hungry. Instead of severely limiting your calories, you just eat nutritionally dense foods, which have fewer calories overall anyway. So you f ...more

Ask questions. When you're researching different dieting plans, products or even talking to a doctor about diets, ask as many questions as you can. Being well informed will help you choose the best diet for you and the one that is the most safe. Reputable programs and their staff should be able to answer questions regarding safety, efficacy and cost.[20] Ask questions like:

I got this (well, actually the 2011 version) for my boss who eats at Hooters like everyday and wants to lose his potbelly but refuses to give up junky food. A lot of it's the lesser of two evils, so if you're super jonzing for some fries and you want to TRY to be good, you'll learn that KFC's wedges are actually pretty sensible. It also has a sweet grocery guide where it's not the lesser of two evils, but the better choice, period, arming you for smarter shopping. I started reading it and was so ...more
It's no surprise that Dr. Dean Ornish's program is such a powerful tool for weight loss, considering its easy adaptability as a lasting lifestyle. The diet is mostly plant-based, keeps sodium intake in moderation, and limits coffee to a cup a day (two cups decaf) — so if you're looking to lose weight while keeping your java flow, you may want to consider another plan.
There is a substantial market for products which claim to make weight loss easier, quicker, cheaper, more reliable, or less painful. These include books, DVDs, CDs, cremes, lotions, pills, rings and earrings, body wraps, body belts and other materials, fitness centers, clinics, personal coaches, weight loss groups, and food products and supplements.[23]
The value obtained from this equation is the estimated number of calories a person can consume in a day to maintain their body-weight assuming they remain at rest. This value is multiplied by an activity factor (generally 1.2-1.95) dependent on a person's typical levels of exercise in order to obtain a more realistic value for maintaining body-weight (since people are less likely to be at rest throughout the course of an entire day). 1 pound of body weight, or approximately 0.45 kg, equates to about 3,500 calories. As such, in order to lose 1 pound per week, it is recommended that 500 calories be shaved off the estimate of calories necessary for weight maintenance per day. For example, if a person has an estimated allotment of 2,500 calories per day to maintain body-weight, consuming 2,000 calories per day for one week would theoretically result in 3,500 calories (or 1 pound) lost during the period.

“I tell all of my celebrity and professional-athlete clients to get between 6 and 8 hours of sleep per night. Everyone is overly focused on food, water and exercise, all of which are extremely imperative to weight loss and optimal health. However, without proper sleep, all of these the other factors are null and void. When you don’t get enough sleep, levels of the hormone leptin drop, which increases appetite. This surge in appetite makes comfort food more appealing, which can derail weight loss efforts.” — Jay Cardiello, celebrity fitness and nutrition expert
The original ETNT was reviewed by Tara Parker-Pope of The New York Times Well Blog writes, “The comparisons are always interesting and often surprising.” Though critics don’t love every comparison. Parker-Pope went on to write, “Chances are you won’t agree with every item. For instance, in a comparison of choices for a child’s Easter basket, I can’t figure out why Jelly Belly Jelly Beans, with 150 calories (630 kJ), are an ‘eat this,’ while Marshmallow Peeps, with 140 calories (590 kJ), are a ‘not that.’”[4]

You already know that a perfect diet doesn't exist, but many of us still can't resist the urge to kick ourselves when we indulge, eat too much, or get thrown off course from restrictive diets. The problem: This only makes it more difficult, stressful, and downright impossible to lose weight. So rather than beating yourself up for eating foods you think you shouldn't, let it go. Treating yourself to about 200 calories worth of deliciousness each day — something that feels indulgent to you — can help you stay on track for the long-haul, so allow yourself to eat, breathe, and indulge. Food should be joyful, not agonizing!
Think sweets are the enemy of weight loss success? Not so fast: dark chocolate might just be your best friend for weight loss (and that doesn't even include these other 5 Health Benefits of Eating Chocolate). Researchers at the University of Copenhagen fed healthy young men 100g of either milk or dark chocolate first thing in the morning, then had them rate their hunger level and fed them a meal of pizza two hours later. They found that the men who had dark chocolate were felt more satisfied after eating the chocolate, were less hungry, and ate less (17 percent fewer calories than the milk chocolate eaters) when offered pizza at their next meal. 
You start to link up the cost of points with the cost of certain foods on your body, without any item every becoming taboo or strictly off-limits. Our tester found the point system both easy-to-use and eye-opening. “I can’t believe how many ‘healthy’ or at least innocuous foods are actually bad for you,” she remarked, noting how diet staples like granola bars took a big bite out of her daily allotment of points.
If you ever needed an excuse to eat more avocados, this is it. People tend to steer clear of healthy fats when they're trying to lose weight, but they might just be the solution. Studies show that by simply adding some avocado to your lunch every day, it'll fill you up enough that you won't be mindlessly munching on junk food later. "Slice one in half, sprinkle a little sea salt, and eat the inside with a spoon," says Alexandra Samit, a Be Well Health Coach at Dr. Frank Lipman's Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in NYC.
This book is terrible. I read this book during a slow day at the bookstore where I work, and I was disgusted. A book that suggests you can lose weight by making the giant lifestyle decision to eat a Big Mac instead of a Whopper is mostly likely authored by Satan. It also offers genius advice on which entree at Chipotle packs the least calories, as well as the healthiest menu item at TGI Friday's.

Some popular beliefs attached to weight loss have been shown to either have less effect on weight loss as commonly believed or are actively unhealthy. According to Harvard Health, the idea of metabolism being the "key to weight" is "part truth and part myth" as while metabolism does affect weight loss, external forces such as diet and exercise have an equal effect.[44] They also commented that the idea of changing one's rate of metabolism is under debate.[44] Diet plans in fitness magazines are also often believed to be effective, but may actually be harmful by limiting the daily intake of important calories and nutrients which can be detrimental depending on the person and are even capable of driving individuals away from weight loss.[45]


"Inadequate intake of calories, especially protein, causes the body to breakdown muscle tissue to meet the needs for amino acids," says Cederquist. "I have my patients focus on obtaining adequate lean protein and spreading it throughout the day." Her recommendation: focus on 100 grams per day, which breaks down into three to four ounces of protein at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and a few ounces for snacks.
Realizing that eating unhealthy food is a bad habit, like smoking or biting your nails, will help you break the cycle. Going cold turkey on favorite snack foods isn't possible for everyone, and if you relapse and chow down on some chocolate, the first step is to forgive yourself for the lapse. Identify the times of day or the activities you engage in that tempt you to reach for the junk food. Being aware that it's going to happen will help you stave off the cravings and gives you the chance to substitute in a healthier option. Don't be afraid to let your friends and family know what you're doing so they can support and cheer you on, and so they can help you avoid cravings.
You may not be the kind of person who can work out in the gym. Not everyone likes that atmosphere, and thankfully, you have plenty of options when it comes to getting exercise that don't involve running on the treadmill. If you're a fan of the water, try swimming laps instead. This is great for people who have joint pain or bone issues, as it doesn't put pressure on the limbs. Join a sports team, take a dance lesson, or join a hiking group. If you've ever dreamed about adding a physical hobby to your life, now is the time to do it.

“Your body begins to work differently. This study proves that small amounts of nourishment throughout the day are better than the same amount of food concentrated in three big sittings. If we feed the body at regular intervals we send a signal to the body that it doesn’t have to store calories. Conversely, when we skip meals we send just the opposite signal for the body to store calories, creating a negative effect on the metabolism.” — Dr. Wayne Scott Andersen, co-founder and Medical Director at Take Shape For Life
Dietary composition may have a role in preventing weight regain after weight loss. Low carbohydrate diets have been used a lot for weight loss, but their effects in long-term weight control are controversial. Poor dietary compliance is one of the most common problems associated with these diets. They also have to be supplemented because of nutrient deficiency.[48] Soenen demonstrates that a higher protein intake, which is related to lower weight gain and lower carbohydrate intake has no additional results.[49] The relationship between more protein intake and less weight regain has been shown previously.[50]
Published in May 2010, this book exposes drinks with high concentration of sugar, and schools readers on smarter choices for their favored drinking habits—whether it be a Starbucks run, a night out at a bar, or a post-workout beverage. This book spills the nutritional information on beverages sold at supermarkets, restaurants, fast-food chains, and liquor stores.
They should help keep you from feeling deprived and bingeing on higher-calorie foods. For instance: honey has just 64 fat-releasing calories in one tablespoon. Eggs have just 70 calories in one hard-boiled egg, loaded with fat-releasing protein. Part-skim ricotta cheese has just 39 calories in one ounce, packed with fat-releasing calcium. Dark chocolate has about 168 calories in a one-ounce square, but it’s packed with fat releasers. And a University of Tennessee study found that people who cut 500 calories a day and ate yogurt three times a day for 12 weeks lost more weight and body fat than a group that only cut the calories. The researchers concluded that the calcium in low-fat dairy foods triggers a hormonal response that inhibits the body’s production of fat cells and boosts the breakdown of fat.
To splurge or not to splurge? That is the perennial weight-loss question. Should you allow for occasional indulgences in your healthy-eating program, or say a firm “no” out of fear they will sabotage your results? Once you start a new regimen, it can be scary to stray from it. So how can you navigate the path of progress without veering into perfectionism? Here’s some professional counsel. 
Write what you ate (including seasonings, garnishes, and sauces,) and how much of it you had. Record the time, the place, the company you kept, and how you were feeling at the time. You also might want to include if you were engaging in any activity, like working at your desk while you had lunch. This is a great way to see where your main concerns lie. You might be snacking too much in mid-afternoon, or running for fast food when on a time crunch at work. Though it might seem tempting to skip this step, especially if you think you can already identify your bad habits, try it out anyway. Putting down every detail will most likely illuminate areas ready for improvement you didn't know existed.
Potassium, magnesium, and calcium can help to serve as a counter-balance for sodium. Foods that are rich in potassium include leafy greens, most "orange" foods (oranges, sweet potatoes, carrots, melon) bananas, tomatoes, and cruciferous veggies — especially cauliflower. Low-fat dairy, plus nuts, and seeds can also help give you a bloat-busting boost. They've also been linked to a whole host of additional health benefits, such as lowering blood pressure, controlling blood sugar, and reducing risk of chronic disease overall.
Speaking of intervals, high-intensity interval training (otherwise known as HIIT) has been shown to be incredibly effective for weight loss. Because the workouts are so intense, you don't need to put in an hour — or even 30 minutes — at the gym. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, seven minutes is all you need to get in the best shape of your life.
When the pounds start coming off, some people are tempted to increase their amount of gym time to accelerate their progress. Don't give in. As with your dietary changes, working out is a lifestyle change, and those don't happen in a week. While it is possible to increase the amount of time you spend at the gym, you don't want to do it all at once in such a way that you either get injured or burn yourself out & start to hate the gym.
The size of your plates and bowls may also have a lot to do with portion control. If you have large dinner plates, the temptation is there to fill them up. Try dining from a side plate instead, and eat slowly so your body has a chance to register that you're no longer hungry. Measuring cups are also useful. If you want a snack, allow yourself half a cup. Measure it into a bowl and don't refill. It's a lot easier to manage portions when you measure them.
Published in December 2008, the Supermarket Survival Guide addresses grocery-store, food shopping, and using the format of swapping out one unhealthy product for a better one. It provides label decoders (defining claims like "free range" or "organic") and nutritional values on all the various areas of the supermarket (such as the produce section, meat counter, and cereal aisles). A shopper can use this book to filter through the multiple brand choices, and discern what product—whether it be deli meat or sandwich bread—is the healthiest option.
Losing weight and eating healthy foods go hand-in-hand, and if most of your grocery store purchases are prepackaged or prepared foods, you might be consuming food additives that aren't doing your waistline any favors. The best way to avoid this is to stick to as many whole, unprepared ingredients as possible and to cook your food at home. That way, you know what's going into your meals.
You’ve heard of a self-fulfilling prophecy? If you keep focusing on things you can’t do, like resisting junk food or getting out the door for a daily walk, chances are you won’t do them. Instead (whether you believe it or not) repeat positive thoughts to yourself. “I can lose weight.” “I will get out for my walk today.” “I know I can resist the pastry cart after dinner.” Repeat these phrases and before too long, they will become true for you.

This is a tricky question. You can eat whatever you want and lose weight as long as you stay in your calorie range. Theoretically, you could eat candy bars all day and lose weight. But you probably wouldn't want to. Why? Because it would be very hard to stay in your calorie range if you don't eat nutritious foods. Healthy foods help you to feel strong, energized and satiated. Empty calorie foods don't provide your body with the nutrients you need to live an active, well life. And when you eat junk food, you're likely to get hungry more often and overeat as a result.
The value obtained from this equation is the estimated number of calories a person can consume in a day to maintain their body-weight assuming they remain at rest. This value is multiplied by an activity factor (generally 1.2-1.95) dependent on a person's typical levels of exercise in order to obtain a more realistic value for maintaining body-weight (since people are less likely to be at rest throughout the course of an entire day). 1 pound of body weight, or approximately 0.45 kg, equates to about 3,500 calories. As such, in order to lose 1 pound per week, it is recommended that 500 calories be shaved off the estimate of calories necessary for weight maintenance per day. For example, if a person has an estimated allotment of 2,500 calories per day to maintain body-weight, consuming 2,000 calories per day for one week would theoretically result in 3,500 calories (or 1 pound) lost during the period.
… that lists sugar, fructose, or corn syrup among the first four ingredients on the label. You should be able to find a lower-sugar version of the same type of food. If you can’t, grab a piece of fruit instead, especially if you show signs you’re eating too much sugar. Look for sugar-free varieties of foods such as ketchup, mayonnaise, and salad dressing. Also, avoid partially hydrogenated foods, and look for more than two grams of fiber per 100 calories in all grain products. Finally, a short ingredient list means fewer flavor enhancers and empty calories. Sounds impossible, but you can actually learn how to give up sugar without missing it.
"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
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