“You can’t just say, ‘I want to lose weight…someday.’ It’s that kind of loose talk, without a fence or guideline, that discourages you from getting started and prevents you from succeeding. The way I did it was by tying it to an upcoming event in my life. I never focused on a number and I didn’t set out to lose a certain number of pounds per week or overall. I merely found a target date a year away and I proclaimed to myself that I’d be in better shape by then. — Maria Menounos, author of  The Everygirl’s Guide to Diet and Fitness, on how she lost 40 pounds

Don't become overwhelmed with the initial hype. Really consider whether you can maintain a plan and if it provides the tools and strategies you require for long-term success. Can you realistically eat this way for the rest of your life? Does the plan include other strategies – exercise, sleep, stress control, etc. – that complement long-term success? Once you've found the right plan, commit to it. What you put into it, you'll get back. Very best wishes as you begin your fat-loss journey. 


Losing weight quickly is dangerous and comes back quickly. You need to slowly change your habits and make small changes you can build on. Start by being more active; start walking every day and start adding in more and more jogging. Cut out sugary drinks and focus on adding in more veggies and lean proteins in your diet while whittling out processed/fried foods. Be kind to yourself and make the changes for your own happiness, not anything or anyone else.
“I had pizza last night — I know it’s bad!” As a nutrition coach, I often hear this from my clients. As a food lover myself, I’ve never been a fan of labeling foods as “good” or “bad,” since it can associate emotional negativity with eating. I worry it can also promote impossible expectations — the idea of needing to eat “perfectly” to be successful in weight loss.

Some studies have assessed the effects of special foods on weight maintenance. For example, weight regain did not occur in individuals who had consumed green tea and caffeine mixture with an adequate or high-protein diet. Only, in the group with an adequate protein intake, a higher hunger score and lower satiety was seen.[40] Based on a recent meta-analysis, green tea has no significant effect on the weight loss maintenance.[41] It may have some consequences in habitual low caffeine consumers.[42]


“If I had to pick one food for weight loss, I would choose oatmeal. It’s a whole grain, high-fiber carbohydrate that sticks to your ribs, so it keeps you full and satisfied. Eating it also leads to a slow rise in blood sugar, which has been shown to keep insulin levels from spiking, leading to less fat storage. The key with oatmeal is how to make it so it’s not a calorie bomb. I recommend making it with nonfat milk in place of water, stirring in chopped raw nuts or natural nut butter, and topping with fresh or frozen fruits. If you need some added sweetness, a drizzle of maple syrup should do it. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
Pick your hobbies around their activity level. Rather than sitting around and watching television for entertainment, get an audiobook from the library and take a long walk. Stretch out your new leanness in a yoga class. Learn to build things, or get started on some of those DIY home improvement projects you've been meaning to do. Even something as simple as taking the stairs at work or parking far away from the entrance in the store parking lot adds small bits of physical activity to your daily life that add up over the course of the week.

What's more trustworthy than a diet built by experts from the Mayo Clinic? Created by doctors, nutritionists, and all-star chefs, the plan has a few phases: In the first, you should lose 6 to 10 pounds in two weeks. After that, you can expect to lose 1 to 2 pounds a week until you reach your goal weight. You're also given plenty of resources and advice to help you keep the weight off.
Even if you manage to meet your goal, it probably won’t be sustainable: “The amount of restriction required will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct,” Dr. Seltzer says. What’s more, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, he adds.
×