There are different ways that you can keep track of your daily calorie intake. Many dieters use a smartphone app or websites like MyFitnessPal or LoseIt. These services allow you to input the food you've eaten along with your portion size and it automatically calculates your daily calories. There are also activity trackers, like Fitbit, which help you count daily food calories and daily exercise calories. If you're not a fan of tech gadgets, use a paper food journal. Simply write your calories in a notebook or on a daily food intake sheet to count your daily numbers.
At the same time, wearing clothes you can actually move in (read: not stilettos and a tiny pencil skirt) to work might help keep you active during the day instead of parked at your desk. A study by the American Council on Exercise found that people took an average of eight percent more steps on days that they wore jeans instead of conventional business clothes. You officially have a health excuse to ask for casual Friday every day.
To prep his patients for success, Dr. Seltzer tells them to plan around a large evening meal by eating a lighter breakfast and lunch—NBD since most people who eat a meal before bed tend to wake up feeling relatively full, he says. Research suggests balanced bedtime meals may also promote steady next-day blood sugar levels, which also helps with appetite regulation.
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