“Oolong, or ‘black dragon,’ is a kind of Chinese tea that’s packed with catechins, nutrients that help promote weight loss by boosting your body’s ability to metabolize fat. A study in the Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine found that participants who regularly sipped oolong tea lost a pound a week, without doing anything else to change their diet or exercise habits.” — Kelly Choi, author of  The 7-Day Flat-Belly Tea Cleanse
It is important to remember that proper diet and exercise is largely accepted as the best way to lose weight. It is inadvisable to lower calorie intake by more than 1,000 calories per day, as losing more than 2 pounds per week can be unhealthy, and can result in the opposite effect in the near future by reducing metabolism. Losing more than 2 pounds a week will likely involve muscle loss, which in turn lowers BMR since more muscle mass results in higher BMR. Excessive weight loss can also be due to dehydration, which is unhealthy. Furthermore, particularly when exercising in conjunction with dieting, maintaining a good diet is important, since the body needs to be able to support its metabolic processes and replenish itself. Depriving the body of nutrients it requires as part of heavily unhealthy diets can have serious detrimental effects, and weight lost in this manner has been shown in some studies to be unsustainable, since the weight is often regained in the form of fat (putting the participant in a worse state than when beginning the diet). As such, in addition to monitoring calorie intake, it is important to maintain levels of fiber intake as well other nutritional necessities to balance the needs of the body.
Conversely, the more food in front of you, the more you’ll eat—regardless of how hungry you are. So instead of using regular dinner plates that range these days from 10 to 14 inches (making them look empty if they’re not heaped with food), serve your main course on salad plates (about 7 to 9 inches wide). Instead of 16-ounce glasses and oversized coffee mugs, return to the old days of 8-ounce glasses and 6-ounce coffee cups.
This medically-supervised, 12-week program will help you trim your waist and lower your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. Each week you'll get advice from a cardiac nurse, dietitian, exercise physiologist and a clinical psychologist. The program meets on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Call 630-527-2825 for session dates.
Eggs are a fantastic source of protein, and if you're worried about cholesterol, nix the yolks. Other great breakfast foods include whole-grain oatmeal, grapefruit, wheat germ, yogurt, bananas, and tea. Coffee is fine, too, as long as you don't load it up with cream and sugar. If you're a bacon and sausage lover, try substituting turkey bacon or turkey sausage.

At any given time, there are dozens of weight-loss hypes in the marketplace that claim to take off 10 pounds in 10 days, or whatever. Desperation can tempt us to try anything — from "clean eating" to cutting out food groups entirely. Keep in mind: Just because an avocado-walnut-"crunchy"-kale-salad dripping in coconut oil is deemed "clean" by a so-called "expert" on your Instagram feed does not make it an unlimited food. Moral of the story? Avoid fads, eat real food, watch some Netflix, and unwind (perhaps with a glass of wine in hand). Now that's my kind of detox.

ETNT for Kids is the second book in the series, and was published in August 2008. Similar to ETNT, this book guides readers to the healthiest options for kids on popular restaurant menus. It also provides a restaurant report card, which provides letter grades for America’s most popular fast-food and sit-down chain restaurants (Those restaurants that refused to give out nutritional information, received an automatic "F"). Other sections help parents and kids navigate the school cafeteria, pack healthy lunches, and shop wisely at the supermarket.


You might feel silly, but it works. When Alan R. Hirsch, MD, neurological director of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago, tried this with 3,000 volunteers, he found that the more frequently people sniffed, the less hungry they were and the more weight they lost—an average of 30 pounds each. One theory is that sniffing the food tricks the brain into thinking you’re actually eating it.
Listen up: Skipping meals will not make you lose weight faster. If a hectic day makes a sit-down meal impossible, stash an energy bar or a piece of fruit in your car or tote, keep snacks in your office desk drawer, and make a point of getting up to grab a nosh — anything that will keep you from going hungry! Going long periods of time without food does double-duty harm on our healthy eating efforts by both slowing down your metabolism, and priming you for another binge later in the day. (Think: You've skipped breakfast and lunch, so you're ready to takedown a whole turkey by dinner!) Make it your mission to eat three meals and two snacks every day, and don't wait longer than three to four hours without eating. Set a "snack alarm" on your phone if needed.
Instead of piling everything on one plate, bring food to the table in individual courses. For the first two courses, bring out soup or veggies such as a green salad or the most filling fruits and vegetables. By the time you get to the more calorie-dense foods, like meat and dessert, you’ll be eating less or may already be full. Nothing wrong with leftovers!
"Eat This, Not That" feeds into people's desire to have their cake and eat it too. When so-called "experts" offer up this kind of blather, a willing public is happy to have sanction to continue their bad habits without solving anything. The book will have been bought and paid for long before the discovery that this is once again just another hoax. If the folks over at Rodale really want to encourage the health and well being of this country they will take a more responsible stand on how to attain this. Selling out is not the answer.
This Calorie Calculator is based on the Mifflin-St Jeor Equation which calculates basal metabolic rate (BMR), and its results are based on an estimated average. The basal metabolic rate is the amount of energy expended per day at rest. There exist other equations including the Harris-Benedict Equation which was used until 1990 before the introduction of the Mifflin-St Jeor Equation and the Katch-McArdle Formula which calculates resting daily energy expenditure (RDEE) by taking lean body mass into account. The Mifflin-St Jeor Equation is considered the most accurate equation for calculating BMR, with the exception that the Katch-McArdle Formula can be more accurate for people who are leaner that know their body fat percentage. The Mifflin-St Jeor Equation is as follows:

Published in November 2009, this restaurant guide summarizes the best and worst meal choices at popular restaurants, hotel buffets, convenience stores, movie theaters, vending machines, and airport and amusement-park eateries. This restaurant survival guide breaks down each best and worst meal selection by calories, fat, sugar, and/or sodium. Extra points are given to foods that are high in protein and fiber. The book decodes restaurant menus of different cuisines—Japanese, barbecue, Chinese, deli—identifying popular dishes, and providing tips on what to order.
Sugar & other fast acting carbohydrates spike your blood sugar level, which in turn leads to your blood sugar level later crashing & thus making you hungry again sooner. No matter how hard you work out, it is hard to lose body mass if you have metabolic syndrome & are resistant to leptin. You can't outrun your fork & it is hard to get your fork under control if you are leptin resistant.

Giancoli also recommends finding a diet that fits in with how you really live. She notes that if you enjoy going out to eat but try to commit to a diet that forbids you from ever going to a restaurant, you’re just going to cheat. “It’s not sustainable… You’re most likely going to have a healthier meal if you’re going to cook yourself, but you’re depriving yourself of that social interaction if you never go out.” To put it another way: Your eating practices shouldn’t isolate you or keep you from having fun.
A calorie deficit is simply an energy shortfall. When you create a calorie deficit, you deprive your body of the fuel it needs to function. So, your body burns stored fat (excess weight) for fuel instead. A calorie deficit occurs when you cut calories by eating less than your body needs or burn extra calories with physical activity. You can also combine diet and exercise to create a calorie deficit.

Reading ingredients and preparing food at home might seem exhausting, and it isn't easy at first to adjust. Many have lost temporarily on fad diets, and it may be tempting to buy diet food instead of preparing your own. However, fad diets are focused on quick weight loss, not long-term solutions and health management, so many people gain back everything they lost (and more!) when the diet is over. You also may be causing holes in your nutrition by cutting out certain foods completely without ensuring that you replace the vitamins elsewhere. Getting healthy and staying slim is a lifestyle change, and fad diets just don't cut it.
“It’s no big surprise, but my go-to weight loss tip is to eat more vegetables. They are the most low-calorie food you can consume, and they’re filled with health-boosting, satiating nutrients. From smoothies and eggs to soups, main and side dishes, they can fit in anywhere and boost volume and nutrition. If you want to eat more while still losing weight, veggies are your answer. —Laura Burak, RD, CDN
In one recent study, the patients were randomized to a low carbohydrate breakfast (LCb) or an isocaloric diet with a high carbohydrate and protein breakfast (HCPb). In the weight maintenance period, the LCb group regained weight, but the HCPb group continued weight loss and they had lower craving score for sweet, high fat, carbohydrate or starch, and fast foods. Weight change had a positive relationship with the craving score.[27] Table 2 contains the dietary composition changes that may affect weight loss maintenance.
“It’s far more difficult to eat a healthier diet and fit in exercise if you don’t plan ahead. Plan out your meals for the week ahead and go grocery shopping over the weekend to ensure you have the ingredients you need on hand. If you can, do some meal prep in your down time—cut fresh veggies, marinate your protein, cook up a batch of whole grains in advance. When you’re prepared you’re far less likely to order takeout. — Jessica Fishman Levinson, MS, RDN, CDN, culinary-nutrition consultant and founder of Nutritioulicious
Don't just concentrate on cardio, however. It's important to bring in muscle-building exercises as well. Since you're focusing on losing and maintaining weight, you don't need to spend as much time building muscle as doing cardio. Your personal trainer can help you decide how often you need to focus on muscle-building. Just remember not to leave any muscle groups out. People usually do this by training with the upper body one day and the lower body the next time. To switch it up, do your limbs during one session and your back and core during the next.

Northwestern Medicine has joined the mix with FoodSwitch, which dubs itself “a nutritionist whispering in your ear.” As you grocery shop, the app allows you to scan an item’s bar code, pull up nutrition facts such as saturated fat, sugar, sodium and energy, and get its health rating based on a five-star scale. Finally, FoodSwitch will suggest healthier alternatives from its database of more than 268,000 products.

Disclaimer: This tool is designed to be used only by veterinary professionals. For obese pets with a body condition score of 7/9 or higher, we advise a weight loss program under the direct guidance of the veterinary health care team. This calculator is only a guideline. Regular monitoring and consideration of outside factors is critical for achieving safe and healthy weight management outcomes. PNA may adjust the formulations based on new data findings.


Working out isn't just about losing weight. It's about overall physical health. So, just because muscle-building exercises, like lifting or strength training, don't burn as many calories, that doesn't mean you should cut them out. Building muscles is good for your bones and your overall physique. Developing muscles will also help change your shape as the mass comes off. No, you won't look bulky if you lift. That bodybuilder effect takes a very specialized diet and weight-training regimen. Plus, having strong muscles makes playing a variety of sports easier, which in turn helps you burn calories.
“If a client has come to me looking to lose 10 pounds, I would tell them to simply move. Move more, and more often. Walk or bike ride to class or work, even park further away from your location in the parking lot. Take the stairs or take a walk during lunch. You don’t have to spend hours every day in the gym sweating, but you do have to make a conscious effort to move more, and sit less. This works great because it doesn’t feel like work and you’re burning more and more calories throughout the day.” — Ajia Cherry, personal trainer and Founder at Functional Innovative Training

The determinants of the ability of weight maintenance are genetic, behavior, and environment. Among them, diet is the most important factor that influences the stability of body weight.[6,7] Some studies have shown that calorie intake less than the requirement and changing the calorie distribution from macronutrients may have a role to play.[8] Also eating behaviors such as higher dietary disinhibition and binge eating result in weight relapse.[2]

“A study published in Nutrition Journal found that participants who ate foods high in monounsaturated fats for lunch (in this case, half an avocado) reported a 40 percent decreased desire to eat for hours afterward. Monounsaturated fats from sources like olive oil, nuts and avocados can reduce cholesterol, promote weight loss, even boost memory.” — David Zinczenko, author of the  Zero Belly Cookbook
“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
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