Disclaimer: Information provided by this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice specific to the reader's particular situation. The information is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have. The reader is advised to seek prompt professional medical advice from a doctor or other healthcare practitioner about any health question, symptom, treatment, disease, or medical condition.
Matt says many Americans eat like they shop.  We are “shopping for calories to stuff into” our bodies’ closets. “What we are buying when we eat at a restaurant is fat, calories and sodium. More is not a bargain, not by a long shot,” says Matt.  Portions are oversized, fattier and more unhealthy than ever.  Even though there are calorie-dense items on the menus of America’s restaurants, Matt says there are tons of delicious ways to cut hundreds, even thousands, of calories from your daily diet. 
• Important Disclaimer: Information provided on disabled-world.com is for general informational and educational purposes only, it is not offered as and does not constitute medical advice. In no way are any of the materials presented meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. Any third party offering or advertising on disabled-world.com does not constitute an endorsement by Disabled World. All trademarks(TM) and registered(R) trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Please report outdated or inaccurate information to us.
Published in December 2009, this recipe book provides meal ideas for breakfast, appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, barbecue, traditional American dishes, international cuisine, snacks, and desserts. Each recipe supplies a breakdown of the nutritional information, serving size, and cost per dish. The homemade recipes' calories are compared to a chain-restaurant's version of each meal, showing a stark difference not only in nutrition, but in price. For mid-afternoon hunger pangs, this book offers a snack matrix of healthy choices (i.e. black bean chips and hummus).[3]
One study from the University of Adelaide in Australia suggests you may lose more weight when you work out towards the end of your menstrual cycle, as opposed to right when a new one begins. That’s because the hormones estrogen and progesterone tell your body to use fat as an energy source. "Women burned about 30 percent more fat for the two weeks following ovulation to about two days before menstruation," study author Leanne Redman says.
Americans are busy, especially during the holiday season. Many people head out for fast food while shopping at the mall or while taking a break from decorating. Matt says we need to make wise choices when eating out. While one in every four meals is eaten on the road at a restaurant or drive-thru, we can still enjoy our favorite foods without suffering the consequences. The economics of the restaurant business are so different than any other business. Restaurants don’t abide by the same rules that grocery stores do, because there are no labels that indicate fat, calories, sodium, etc. Matt says many Americans eat like they shop. We are “shopping for calories to stuff into” our bodies’ closets. “What we are buying when we eat at a restaurant is fat, calories and sodium. More is not a bargain, not by a long shot,” says Matt. Portions are oversized, fattier and more unhealthy than ever. Even though there are calorie-dense items on the menus of America’s restaurants, Matt says there are tons of delicious ways to cut hundreds, even thousands, of calories from your daily diet. BEST OF THE BEST AND WORST OF THE WORST The top 5 worst foods: * Worst Food Invention, pg. 39, Domino’s Chicken Carbonara Breadbowl Pastae, 1,480 calories, 56 g fat (24 saturated, 1 g trans), 2,280 mg sodium, 188 g carbs * Worst Salad, pg. 49, California Pizza Kitchen Thai Crunch Salad with Fresh Avocado, 1,399 calories, 10 g saturated fat, 1,712 mg. sodium, 123 g carbs * Worst Drink, pg. 45, Cold Stone PB&C Shake (Gotta Have It size), 2010 calories, 131 g fat (68 g saturated, 2.5 g trans), 880 mg sodium, 153 g sugars * Worst Kids’ Meal, pg. 42, Cheesecake Factory Kids’ Pasta with Alfredo Sauce, 1,803 calories, 87 g saturated fat, 876 mg sodium, 70 g carbohydrates * Worst Food in America, pg. 53, Outback Steakhouse Baby Back Ribs, 2,310 calories, 177 g fat (67 g saturated), 3,027 g sodium, 58 g carbs The top 5 best foods: * Best Side, pg. 24, Wendy’s Chili, small, 190 calories, 6 g fat, 830 mg sodium, 14 g protein * Best Drive-Thru Mexican, pg. 30, Taco Bell Grilled Steak Soft Tacos fresco style (2), 310 calories, 9 g fat, 1,210 mg sodium, 18 g protein * Best Sandwich, pg. 24, Quiznos Roadhouse Steak Sammie, 250 calories, 7 g fat, 980 mg sodium * Best Pasta, pg. 32, Olive Garden Linguine alla Marinara, 430 calories, 6 g fat (1 g saturated), 900 mg sodium * Best Ice Cream, pg. 84, Ben & Jerry’s, Cherry Garcia Ice Cream, 240 calories, 14 g fat (9 g saturated), 22 g sugars EAT THIS, NOT THAT * Chicken Sandwich: Chick-fil-A Chargrilled Chicken Club, pg. xviii, (410 calories, 12 g fat – 5 g saturated, 1,460 g sodium) vs. Panera Chipotle Chicken (990 calories, 56 g fat -15 g saturated, 1 g trans, 2,370 mg sodium) * Coffee Starbucks Venti Espresso Frappuccino Blended Coffee, pg. xxiii, (290 calories, 3.5 g fat – 2.5 g saturated, 57 g sugars) vs. Dunkin Donuts Large Frozen Cappuccino with Skim Milk (550 calories, 0 g fat, 105 g sugar) * Breakfast: McDonald’s Egg McMuffin, pg. 29, (300 calories, 12 g fat – 5 g saturated, 820 mg sodium, 18 g protein) vs. Panera Bacon, Egg and Cheese Grilled Breakfast Sandwich, (510 calories, 24 g fat - 10 g saturated, .5 trans, 1,060 mg sodium) * Fast Food Burger: Wendy’s ¼ Pound Single, pg. 34, (470 calories, 21 g fat, - 8 g saturated, 1 g trans, 940 mg sodium, 27 g protein) vs. TGI Friday’s Cheddar Burger, (1,310 calories) * Pizza: Dominoe’s Thin Crust Ham and Pineapple Pizza (2 slices), pg. 30 (294 calories, 14 g fat – 5 g saturated, 690 mg sodium) vs. Sbarro Stuffed Pepperoni (1 slice), pg 38, (960 calories)

Carb crazy? Consider this: Refined carbohydrates, such as bread, potatoes and rice, create a surge in insulin that in turn drives down your resting metabolic rate, explains Aronne. "It's important to keep carbohydrates in your diet, but really focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which have less of an effect on insulin levels," he explains. And when buying whole-grain breads and cereals, make sure the first ingredient listed is whole wheat, whole oat or cracked wheat.

A recent study in the journal Obesity found that obese adults who drank about 16 oz of water 30 minutes before their main meals experienced moderate weight loss compared to a group who didn't drink before their meal. Why? For one, water starts filling you up and might help reduce your appetite. Second, another study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found that that drinking about 17 oz of water increases metabolic rate by 30 percent in healthy men and women, and that this metabolic surge reached a maximum 30 to 40 minutes after drinking. Chug a few glasses of water 30 minutes before your meal, and you're prepping your metabolism to rev just in time for food consumption. 


“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
×