Better Breathing – Sleep apnea and other breathing irregularities are more common among obese patients than seen in the general population.  Asthma also occurs more frequently among overweight patients. Treatment is also compromised by obesity, because some studies suggest that the steroids used to ease symptoms are not as effective when used by obese patients.

Published in December 2009, this recipe book provides meal ideas for breakfast, appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, barbecue, traditional American dishes, international cuisine, snacks, and desserts. Each recipe supplies a breakdown of the nutritional information, serving size, and cost per dish. The homemade recipes' calories are compared to a chain-restaurant's version of each meal, showing a stark difference not only in nutrition, but in price. For mid-afternoon hunger pangs, this book offers a snack matrix of healthy choices (i.e. black bean chips and hummus).[3]


We know, you've probably heard these a thousand times. But if you can make these small swaps day-to-day, you'll spare enough calories for the treat foods you really want or to go into a calorie deficit (a.k.a. the key to weight loss). (And this is just the tip of the iceberg. We have 50 more easy ways to cut calories.) Making these simple swaps is the way to health-ify your eating style and lose weight without actually dieting. 


There is no "best" diet because every dieter is different and has a different lifestyle with different needs. The diet that will work best for you is the diet you can stick to. For some people, a do-it-yourself program is best. But others benefit from the structured approach of a commercial weight loss program. Ask yourself key questions about your lifestyle (do you cook? how much time do you have to shop for healthy food? what is your budget?) and then make a decision that fits your needs. 
Some factors that influence the number of calories a person needs to remain healthy include age, weight, height, sex, levels of physical activity, and overall general health. For example, a physically active 25-year-old male that is 6 feet in height requires considerably higher calorie intake than a 5-foot-tall, sedentary 70-year-old woman. Though it differs depending on age and activity level, adult males generally require 2,000-3000 calories per day to maintain weight while adult females need around 1,600-2,400 according to the U.S Department of Health.

Even if you manage to meet your goal, it probably won’t be sustainable: “The amount of restriction required will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct,” Dr. Seltzer says. What’s more, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, he adds.
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