To use the calculator simply enter your details including the desired amount of weight you wish to lose and the time-frame (in days) in which you would like to lose that excess weight - (You can also use the calculator to plan weight gain.) For your convenience the calculator converts pounds to kilos, inches to centimeters, and vice versa. Or you can convert between Pounds Kilograms and Stones.

Watching the scale will also help you calibrate your diet again. You won't be eating quite the same way when you're trying to maintain a stable body mass, since your focus isn't creating a calorie deficit but maintaining a healthy level of calories each day. Your nutritionist and personal trainer can help you with this. Even if you're going it alone, slight eating habit alterations will show up during your weekly weigh-in.


Published in November 2009, this restaurant guide summarizes the best and worst meal choices at popular restaurants, hotel buffets, convenience stores, movie theaters, vending machines, and airport and amusement-park eateries. This restaurant survival guide breaks down each best and worst meal selection by calories, fat, sugar, and/or sodium. Extra points are given to foods that are high in protein and fiber. The book decodes restaurant menus of different cuisines—Japanese, barbecue, Chinese, deli—identifying popular dishes, and providing tips on what to order.

Excellent ideas in this book. The theory behind Eat This, Not That is a lifestyle change--instead of going on a diet, you tweak your diet to consume more of what's good for you (protein, fiber, and healthy fats being the big 3 to watch) and less of what's not (namely bad fat and empty calories). And you don't have to give up the foods you love, or even go hungry. Instead of severely limiting your calories, you just eat nutritionally dense foods, which have fewer calories overall anyway. So you f ...more
Diet & Excercise: Most of what drives gain or loss is what you eat, but it is hard to function by cutting calories excessively. If you have reduced your calories to 1,200 per day, then rather than trying to reduce calories further it is better to try to increase calorie expenditure. Exercising will both make you feel better and make it easier to sleep at night.

Ultimately, weight loss for the long-term requires some short-term behavior change and healthier habit formation. That's why we created our Good Housekeeping Nutritionist Approved Emblem, which exists to help turn smart food choices into healthier eating habits. All GHNA foods and drinks make it easier to find — and eat — good-for-you foods without additional time, effort, and cost. We target the lifestyle-related factors that make healthier eating hard, and find simple but creative solutions that actually work! Look for the emblem on labels wherever you shop for food!
Find an activity that is enjoyable. If additional health problems also accompany overweight or obesity, consult with a medical professional before beginning an exercise program. Start slowly, and then work up to at least three to five 30 minute sessions of moderate exercise per week, or three to five 15 minute sessions of vigorous exercise per week. Strengthening exercises such as sit-ups or weight lifting should also be incorporated two days per week.

Beyond the occasional fidget, you can do simple things like taking the stairs and walking more to increase your overall daily calorie burn—no gym required. "Move as much as possible," says Cederquist. "Wearing a Fitbit or another type of activity tracker is helpful for people to realize just how little many of us move." Cederquist recommends hitting 10,000 steps a day every day for general health and well-being—no excuses. 
Conversely, the more food in front of you, the more you’ll eat—regardless of how hungry you are. So instead of using regular dinner plates that range these days from 10 to 14 inches (making them look empty if they’re not heaped with food), serve your main course on salad plates (about 7 to 9 inches wide). Instead of 16-ounce glasses and oversized coffee mugs, return to the old days of 8-ounce glasses and 6-ounce coffee cups.
You might feel silly, but it works. When Alan R. Hirsch, MD, neurological director of the Smell & Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago, tried this with 3,000 volunteers, he found that the more frequently people sniffed, the less hungry they were and the more weight they lost—an average of 30 pounds each. One theory is that sniffing the food tricks the brain into thinking you’re actually eating it.
Spoon Guru nutritionist Isabel Butler (MSc, ANutr) recommends that “the best way to reduce weight and maintain the weight loss is by simply eating a balanced and healthy diet, without refusing yourself particular foods… If you do cut out foods, you need to make sure your diet is still balanced and you are getting the nutrients your body needs from other sources.”  
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