There's a pretty dizzying amount of research backing up this regime as a solid option to enhance your health, lower cholesterol, and encourage healthy, lasting weight loss. DASH (the acronym stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) has you loading up on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains (surprise!) and removing foods high in saturated fat from your diet. Research also shows that this diet may even ward off the onset of type 2 diabetes.
Published in May 2010, this book exposes drinks with high concentration of sugar, and schools readers on smarter choices for their favored drinking habits—whether it be a Starbucks run, a night out at a bar, or a post-workout beverage. This book spills the nutritional information on beverages sold at supermarkets, restaurants, fast-food chains, and liquor stores.
The franchise makes recommendations about food choices with the aim of improving health. Criteria for unhealthy dishes center on high levels of calories, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and/or sugar content. The healthier alternatives often include higher levels of fiber and/or protein. The franchise brands itself as the "no-diet weight loss solution." As of October 2012, the ETNT franchise has sold more than 8 million copies.

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“Your body begins to work differently. This study proves that small amounts of nourishment throughout the day are better than the same amount of food concentrated in three big sittings. If we feed the body at regular intervals we send a signal to the body that it doesn’t have to store calories. Conversely, when we skip meals we send just the opposite signal for the body to store calories, creating a negative effect on the metabolism.” — Dr. Wayne Scott Andersen, co-founder and Medical Director at Take Shape For Life
After you've settled into the workout routine, and the excitement of those first ten pounds has worn off, your challenge will be keeping yourself from plateauing. If you're getting bored with your exercise or feeling frustration that your body mass has hit a plateau, don't start skipping the gym. If anything, substitute the physical activity. Go to the park. Take a martial arts class. Spend an afternoon kayaking with your friends. Dance or play basketball. Working out doesn't have to be boring, and when you feel that fatigue, it's time to change things up a little. Plus, finding your exercise in an alternate venue will take your mind off losing and put you in the mood for some fun.
Americans are busy, especially during the holiday season. Many people head out for fast food while shopping at the mall or while taking a break from decorating. Matt says we need to make wise choices when eating out. While one in every four meals is eaten on the road at a restaurant or drive-thru, we can still enjoy our favorite foods without suffering the consequences. The economics of the restaurant business are so different than any other business. Restaurants don’t abide by the same rules that grocery stores do, because there are no labels that indicate fat, calories, sodium, etc. Matt says many Americans eat like they shop. We are “shopping for calories to stuff into” our bodies’ closets. “What we are buying when we eat at a restaurant is fat, calories and sodium. More is not a bargain, not by a long shot,” says Matt. Portions are oversized, fattier and more unhealthy than ever. Even though there are calorie-dense items on the menus of America’s restaurants, Matt says there are tons of delicious ways to cut hundreds, even thousands, of calories from your daily diet. BEST OF THE BEST AND WORST OF THE WORST The top 5 worst foods: * Worst Food Invention, pg. 39, Domino’s Chicken Carbonara Breadbowl Pastae, 1,480 calories, 56 g fat (24 saturated, 1 g trans), 2,280 mg sodium, 188 g carbs * Worst Salad, pg. 49, California Pizza Kitchen Thai Crunch Salad with Fresh Avocado, 1,399 calories, 10 g saturated fat, 1,712 mg. sodium, 123 g carbs * Worst Drink, pg. 45, Cold Stone PB&C Shake (Gotta Have It size), 2010 calories, 131 g fat (68 g saturated, 2.5 g trans), 880 mg sodium, 153 g sugars * Worst Kids’ Meal, pg. 42, Cheesecake Factory Kids’ Pasta with Alfredo Sauce, 1,803 calories, 87 g saturated fat, 876 mg sodium, 70 g carbohydrates * Worst Food in America, pg. 53, Outback Steakhouse Baby Back Ribs, 2,310 calories, 177 g fat (67 g saturated), 3,027 g sodium, 58 g carbs The top 5 best foods: * Best Side, pg. 24, Wendy’s Chili, small, 190 calories, 6 g fat, 830 mg sodium, 14 g protein * Best Drive-Thru Mexican, pg. 30, Taco Bell Grilled Steak Soft Tacos fresco style (2), 310 calories, 9 g fat, 1,210 mg sodium, 18 g protein * Best Sandwich, pg. 24, Quiznos Roadhouse Steak Sammie, 250 calories, 7 g fat, 980 mg sodium * Best Pasta, pg. 32, Olive Garden Linguine alla Marinara, 430 calories, 6 g fat (1 g saturated), 900 mg sodium * Best Ice Cream, pg. 84, Ben & Jerry’s, Cherry Garcia Ice Cream, 240 calories, 14 g fat (9 g saturated), 22 g sugars EAT THIS, NOT THAT * Chicken Sandwich: Chick-fil-A Chargrilled Chicken Club, pg. xviii, (410 calories, 12 g fat – 5 g saturated, 1,460 g sodium) vs. Panera Chipotle Chicken (990 calories, 56 g fat -15 g saturated, 1 g trans, 2,370 mg sodium) * Coffee Starbucks Venti Espresso Frappuccino Blended Coffee, pg. xxiii, (290 calories, 3.5 g fat – 2.5 g saturated, 57 g sugars) vs. Dunkin Donuts Large Frozen Cappuccino with Skim Milk (550 calories, 0 g fat, 105 g sugar) * Breakfast: McDonald’s Egg McMuffin, pg. 29, (300 calories, 12 g fat – 5 g saturated, 820 mg sodium, 18 g protein) vs. Panera Bacon, Egg and Cheese Grilled Breakfast Sandwich, (510 calories, 24 g fat - 10 g saturated, .5 trans, 1,060 mg sodium) * Fast Food Burger: Wendy’s ¼ Pound Single, pg. 34, (470 calories, 21 g fat, - 8 g saturated, 1 g trans, 940 mg sodium, 27 g protein) vs. TGI Friday’s Cheddar Burger, (1,310 calories) * Pizza: Dominoe’s Thin Crust Ham and Pineapple Pizza (2 slices), pg. 30 (294 calories, 14 g fat – 5 g saturated, 690 mg sodium) vs. Sbarro Stuffed Pepperoni (1 slice), pg 38, (960 calories)

Trying to lose weight is a lot like cleaning out the basement: It’s overwhelming and near impossible to know where to start—even when you don’t have a ton of weight to lose. But getting the body you’ve always wanted doesn’t have to be a source of stress. If the scale won’t budge and you’re looking to shed the last 10 pounds, there are plenty of ways to reach your goal. To help you get there, we spoke with a handful of celebs that have successfully slimmed down (and kept it off) and dozens of the fitness and diet industries top experts.

We had great fun with this book as a family. So much so that I went out and bought 2 additional versions. Rick and I keep shooting each other looks and shuddering over shared memories of dinners at Outback Steak House where we would split an Onion Blossom without leaving so much as a stray crumb of breading...before we tucked into our enormous dinners. Turns out that in so doing we were consuming over 1000 calories each...before we tucked into our enormous dinners.
OnlinePlus provides tracking as well as community through WW Mobile’s clean and sophisticated Connect news feed, and it costs you just under $36 a month. If you like the idea of getting together IRL, Meetings+OnlinePlus costs about $77 a month. Our tester found the meetings genuinely nice, if a little cheesy. And if you need extra help, there’s a Personal Coaching option for about $107 a month. At every level of membership, you have access to a live coach via Expert Chat.

Eat This, Not That! has been changing the way restaurants and individuals look at healthy eating since 2007. Thanks to their work, fast food and restaurant chains from Applebee's to Wendy's are introducing healthier options and sharing calorie counts on their websites and stores. The magazine highlights food swaps, smart nutrition, and weight loss tips. A subscription guarantees you valuable healthy living secrets quarterly, so you can get the body—and the life—you want. Vibrant photographs pop from the pages while each article provides you with critical healthy-living knowledge. Anyone looking to transform their eating habits and lifestyle will love a subscription to Eat This, Not That! So get ready to embrace your best self yet. With an annual subscription, you'll have a great source of meal and workout inspirations all year long.
Quickly read through this one and the kids version. Both worked as a great reminder as to why I should never eat at restaurants except for very special occasions. Most restaurant meals are loaded with fat, salt, and other unsavory items that I need to avoid. The book is easy to read with lots of pictures and graphics and facts that shock. My one criticism is this: on some pages there were group comparison in which, for example Doritos made the "Eat This" page and pita chips made the "Not That" p ...more
One easy trick if you're a pasta fan is to swap out white pasta for the wonderfully named courgetti (spaghetti made from spiralizing courgette). You’ll hardly notice the difference when you’re eating it, but you’ll be fuller for longer despite consuming fewer calories. When you consume fewer calories, your body can go to your fat reserves for energy, rather than just burning off the food you’ve eaten.  
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