Could this be the healthiest salad you've ever eaten? It's only 200 calories and packed with vegetables, including cucumbers, watercress, artichoke hearts, celery, and red onion, and gets a hint of tangy flavor from feta cheese. Even the simple dressing—fresh lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil—is heart healthy and light. Cucumbers are a Mediterranean superfood as they're very low in calories; provide 62% of the vitamin K recommended for daily-consumption, and offer a healthy dose of vitamin C.
Fresco came up with the premise from wanting to make "a family show with an interesting approach that we haven’t seen before". The zombie angle also allowed Fresco to explore the concept of Narcissism stating that "the undead are the ultimate narcissists. They want what they want when they want it and will do anything to just have what they want and don’t care about other people’s needs" [13]

There's no one "Mediterranean" diet. At least 16 countries border the Mediterranean Sea. Diets vary between these countries and also between regions within a country. Many differences in culture, ethnic background, religion, economy and agricultural production result in different diets. But the common Mediterranean dietary pattern has these characteristics:
Severely restricting carbohydrates to less than 0.7 ounces (20 grams) a day can result in a process called ketosis. Ketosis occurs when you don't have enough sugar (glucose) for energy, so your body breaks down stored fat, causing ketones to build up in your body. Side effects from ketosis can include nausea, headache, mental and physical fatigue, and bad breath.
Exercising will help you lose more weight compared to just diet alone. But, it is only advised to start heavy workouts during the phase II, as you’ll be having less strength on the first 3 days due to low calorie consumption. However, you can do regular jogging, walking or running on a treadmill along with some yoga and meditation during the phase I.
We reached out to two experts to see what they thought — and if the diet works. "It’s a low calorie diet that includes typical American foods," said Janis Jibrin, MS, RD, an adjunct professor of Nutrition at American University. "It’s nutritionally deficient, but not as crazy as some (i.e. juice fasts)." When it comes to the meal plan, she's not a fan. "It’s too low in many nutrients," she explains. Day 2 alone is "so low in fiber, iron, calcium and other nutrients, yet it manages to hit the daily sodium max. (Actually, most health authorities recommend 2,300 mg as a max, so this diet exceeds it.) Sure, the other four days offer more calories and nutrients, but even so, you’re still skimping."
When the data were examined, it was clear that people who ate a diet where fruits and vegetables, grains, beans, and fish were the basis of daily meals were healthiest. Topping the chart were residents of Crete. Even after the deprivations of World War II – and in part, perhaps, because of them –  the cardiovascular health of Crete residents exceeded that of US residents. Researchers attributed the differences to diet.
Saturated fat and trans fat are the main dietary culprits in increasing your risk of coronary artery disease. DASH helps keep your daily saturated fat to less than 6 percent of your total calories by limiting use of meat, butter, cheese, whole milk, cream and eggs in your diet, along with foods made from lard, solid shortenings, and palm and coconut oils.

A military gentleman who attended our church some years back introduced me to this diet. He said that military recruits use this diet when they need to get in shape quickly. Since then I’ve done extensive research and heard from countless people who have tried this plan. Combined with my own personal trial and error, the diet that follows is carefully tested and includes advice to help you succeed. Feel confident and see the results for yourself!
Karen D'Souza is the theater critic for the Mercury News and the Bay Area News Group papers. She is a three-time Pulitzer juror, a former USC/Getty Arts Journalism Fellow and a longtime member of the Glickman Drama Jury and the American Theatre Critics Association. She has a Master's Degree in Journalism from UC Berkeley. She is a Twitter addict (@KarenDSouza4), a fangirl and a mommy and her writings have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Miami Herald, the San Francisco Chronicle and American Theatre Magazine.
I encourage everyone to share their experiences and successes in the comment area below. Please feel free to cheer each other on, give helpful tips, make friends, and just have some fun! I hope everyone finds this page useful and that it helps you in your weight loss journey. (As usual, please use good manners and avoid rude comments. Keep it friendly and be polite!

The big pro to this diet is that it’s very heart-friendly; the con is that for some people, the lure of a low-carb diet is often the ability to eat highly palatable foods, like bacon and cheese. Research analyzing the benefit of a low-carb Mediterranean diet on diabetes, such as one study published in July 2014 in the journal Diabetes Care, have advised participants to keep carbohydrates to no more than 50 percent of their daily calories and get at least 30 percent of their calories from fat, focusing on vegetables and whole grains as carb sources.


While some Mediterranean diets do include a good deal of carbohydrates — in the form of pasta or bread, for example — being active and otherwise consuming very low levels of sugar means that insulin resistance remains rare in these countries. The Mediterranean style of eating helps prevent peaks and valleys in blood sugar levels, which zaps energy and takes a toll on your mood. All of these various factors contribute to this diet’s diabetes prevention capabilities.
Even if they can be included in a diet that leads to weight loss, eating empty calories like processed bread, peanut butter and ice cream are not ideal in terms of improving your health. A major drawback of most diets that focus too much on counting and limiting calories is that they don’t emphasize the importance of eating quality nutrient-dense foods.
Still, the Military Diet isn’t associated with the military at all. It also doesn’t follow the principles used in the actual military. In fact, as one review published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences that examined of nutrition in the military stated, “Nutrition and the military are fundamentally entwined.” (1) Historically, a lack of a balanced diet has led to poor military performance.
For example, a reporter from CNN interviewed several officials from from the U.S. military — including one nutrition specialist who helps design meal plans for active members of the military — to find our their opinions on the diet. Officials told CNN that most people in the military had never even heard of “the 3-day military diet,” military officials definitely did not help develop the diet, and the 3-day military diet plan had “absolutely no resemblance to the real military diet” since it includes less calories and lower levels of nutrients. (2) Those aren’t exactly the best 3-day military diet reviews.

Low-carb diets may help prevent or improve serious health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. In fact, almost any diet that helps you shed excess weight can reduce or even reverse risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Most weight-loss diets — not just low-carb diets — may improve blood cholesterol or blood sugar levels, at least temporarily.
×