The main issue with every article I’ve read about this diet plan is they all follow the logic of, “it can lead to lack of certain nutrients,” which you’d easily replenish during the 4 days off. Then “it doesn’t work because you’ll just gain the weight right back,” assuming that when you stop the diet, you go right back to your usual lifestyle of overeating and not exercising, which is typically what made you overweight to begin with. The problem with that thought is that, if you “lose the weight” which should never be the focus, but the vfigure you desire. Ignore the number on the scale because BMI doesn’t account for muscle mass, bone structure, etc.
Cooking is probably the hardest part of the DASH diet. Otherwise, it’s pretty unrestrictive, you don’t need to buy anything special to follow it and everyone in the house can enjoy it. “It will likely help the whole family support good health, and since it’s based on whole, lightly or unprocessed foods, it’s more of a long-term eating style rather than a diet,” Ward says. That means you’re more likely to stick with it.
Who actually created this diet? I can’t find any data on its development, much less any studies on its effectiveness or healthfulness. All of this supports my initial gut instinct that this diet has zero backing in science and health. Also, this diet appears to masquerade under several different names, the Cardiac Diet being one. Search both Cardiac and Military diets, and you’ll find the exact same three-day menu and protocol, although the Cardiac Diet is suggested to be a diet that physicians prescribe to obese patients for quick weight loss.
The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan incorporated more fruits and vegetables, low fat or nonfat dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduced systolic blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called "pre-hypertension"). Those with hypertension dropped by 11 and 6 mm Hg, respectively. These changes in blood pressure occurred with no changes in body weight. The DASH dietary pattern is adjusted based on daily caloric intake ranging from 1,600 to 3,100 dietary calories.[2]
Just before her birthday, Rocio decided to lose a few pounds by following the Military Diet. Using an old photocopy her mom had given her from years before, Rocio got started with the diet. Rocio shares with viewers that her mom has been using the diet for years, and had encouraged her to try it. So, although there’s been a lot of hype recently about the diet, it’s by no means new. You’ll notice that her Military Diet plan varies from the one we’ve listed- probably due to the fact that there are various versions of the diet floating around online. Rocio was able to lose 7 pounds while on the diet. She reports that she didn’t feel hungry; but she thinks that drinking water and staying strong mentally helped her. However, due to a birthday cake binge, she gained back 2 pounds after completing the diet. That’s an important reminder to all of us: avoid binge-eating after completing the diet or the pounds will come right back on! Take a look at her experience.
“On a low-carbohydrate diet, the body may have better access to its calories — the fat cells aren’t hoarding them as much. So there are more calories available for the muscles, for the brain, liver, other organs,” as Dr. David Ludwig, a professor of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health, told TODAY.  That may explain why people who stick to a low-carb regimen burn more energy than those who don’t. Some of the most popular diets today include low-carb options such as the Keto diet and the Atkins diet.
Recommended by the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as a healthful dietary pattern,8 the DASH diet is an amalgam of every healthful eating recommendation that health and nutrition experts have been making for decades, eg, eat more fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy, nuts and seeds, beans, and whole grains, and lower intake of sodium and sugar.

While the diet as a whole may not be as varied as your regular diet, it does include enough rich and nutritious foods that it should meet your body’s basic needs. The diet only lasts three days, which means you’ll soon be able to eat a greater variety of foods that will fill in the gaps you’ve missed while dieting. If you were to keep following the diet, repeating the 3-day cycle over and over, you’d run into serious nutritional deficiencies.


This guideline isn’t as daunting as it may seem. “Make a salad with at least 2 cups of vegetables for lunch and have 2 cups of roasted, stir-fried or steamed vegetables at dinner. To get your last serving, either make an omelet with vegetables in the morning or snack on a cup of vegetables like cucumber, celery and bell pepper sticks during the day,” suggests Nour Zibdeh, RDN, an integrative and functional dietitian who specializes in digestive and autoimmune disorders.
This is quite a strange article because it basically says that the 3-day-military diet is not good, which I agree with. It seems that the cons of the diet far outweigh the pros. Nevertheless, the fact that it is 3 days only is a good thing since following it for any longer is undoubtedly bad for your health. The possible side effects also sound pretty terrible. The author’s overall conclusions are very sensible and should be followed.

There’s no official guideline that defines a low-carb diet, says Schmidt. But generally speaking, consuming about 50 to 100 g of carbs a day is considered a basic low-carb diet, she says. That said, it can be more — it’s all about eating fewer carbs than is normal for you. The perk of this plan is it’s individualized, allowing you to eat the amount that best meets your body’s needs. It also gives you leeway to choose what carbs you want to include (fruits, vegetables, dairy, whole grains, nuts, and seeds) rather than being on a plan that tells you what you need to eat and when. It’s best for someone who likes that freedom, and doesn’t want to spend the time counting grams of carbs.
The DASH Diet, which stands for dietary approaches to stop hypertension, is promoted by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to do exactly that: stop (or prevent) hypertension, aka high blood pressure. It emphasizes the foods you've always been told to eat (fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean protein and low-fat dairy), which are high in blood pressure-deflating nutrients like potassium, calcium, protein and fiber. DASH also discourages foods that are high in saturated fat, such as fatty meats, full-fat dairy foods and tropical oils, as well as sugar-sweetened beverages and sweets. Following DASH also means capping sodium at 2,300 milligrams a day, which followers will eventually lower to about 1,500 milligrams. DASH Diet is balanced and can be followed long term, which is a key reason nutrition experts rank it as U.S. News’ Best Overall Diet, tied with the Mediterranean Diet.
The focus of the DASH Diet is more about what you can eat, rather than cutting foods out (like many trendy diets do these days). The basic idea is to load up on fruits and veggies, choose whole grains over refined, include calcium-rich low-fat dairy items, and eat modest amounts of lean meat and fish. Pretty straightforward, right? With this week's meal plan, we make it even easier to follow the DASH Diet with 7 days of healthy and delicious dinners.
But experts like Dr. Ludwig argue that the obesity epidemic is driven by refined carbohydrates such as sugar, juices, bagels, white bread, pasta and heavily processed cereals. These foods tend to spike blood sugar and insulin, a hormone that promotes fat storage, and they can increase appetite. Dr. Ludwig and his colleague Dr. Cara Ebbeling have published studies suggesting that diets with different ratios of carbs and fat but identical amounts of calories have very different effects on hormones, hunger and metabolism. He has also written a best-selling book on lower-carb diets.
Do follow a sensible diet after the initial 3 days. Though it may be tempting, especially if the pounds are melting away, don't cycle multiple rounds of the 3 Day Military Diet back to back. Your body needs more calories and nutrition than the diet provides. You can still make progress towards weight loss goals if you keep your post 3 Day Diet plan healthy.

In the early 1900s Frederick Madison Allen developed a highly restrictive short term regime which was described by Walter R. Steiner at the 1916 annual convention of the Connecticut State Medical Society as The Starvation Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus.[63]:176–177[64][65][66] People showing very high urine glucose levels were confined to bed and restricted to an unlimited supply of water, coffee, tea, and clear meat broth until their urine was "sugar free"; this took two to four days but sometimes up to eight.[63]:177 After the person's urine was sugar-free food was re-introduced; first only vegetables with less than 5g of carbohydate per day, eventually adding fruits and grains to build up to 3g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight. Then eggs and meat were added, building up to 1g of protein/kg of body weight per day, then fat was added to the point where the person stopped losing weight or a maximum of 40 calories of fat per kilogram per day was reached. The process was halted if sugar appeared in the person's urine.[63]:177–178 This diet was often administered in a hospital in order to better ensure compliance and safety.[63]:179
A category of diets is known as low-glycemic-index diets (low-GI diets) or low-glycemic-load diets (low-GL diets), in particular the Low GI Diet.[12] The low-insulin-index diet, is similar, except it is based on measurements of direct insulemic responses i.e., the amount of insulin in the bloodstream to food rather than glycemic response to the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Although such diet recommendations mostly involve lowering nutritive carbohydrates, some low-carbohydrate foods are discouraged, as well (e.g., beef).[13]
According to its website, the Military Diet works due to its combination of putting the body into a starvation state while consuming fat-burning foods. In fact, the site suggests that the extremely low level of calories is a form of fasting. Research on forms of intermittent fasting has suggested some potential health benefits, but the Military Diet doesn’t follow the same protocol that most research studies have used (going 16 hours without eating or alternating extremely low and moderate calories days, as well as emphasizing nutrient-dense choices when food is consumed).

This is the second time I'm doing the military diet. The first time I did it I lost 7 pounds in three days. I can't drink caffeine and I know that is a huge part of this diet, but I still lost weight. Over the first night I lost 4 pounds. I was thrilled with the results so it encouraged me to keep going. I'm glad to say I don't have much to lose but just wanted to feel less bloated... and this diet worked. The third day is tough and you will be a little hungry but it's worth it because you will feel better. I didn't exercise at all during this diet so I may have had better results if I did. I'm a believer and have told a few friends about it. Good luck everyone. It's only 3 days... try it and stick to it! You get to eat hot dogs and ice cream!
Eating the Mediterranean way might be a natural Parkinson’s disease treatment, a great way to preserve your memory, and a step in the right direction for naturally treating Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Cognitive disorders can occur when the brain isn’t getting a sufficient amount of dopamine, an important chemical necessary for proper body movements, mood regulation and thought processing.
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Plan. Buy your food ahead of time so you aren't tempted by grocery shopping while hungry. Hunger destroys willpower. Buy enough food to last you through the whole diet so that you can avoid the temptation of shopping during the diet. Also, get rid of any junk food you have at home. Don’t just lock it in a closet, give it away and get it out of your house entirely. You don’t want anything to lead you astray while you’re on your diet and feeling very hungry. If you know there’s no junk food at home, you won’t tempt yourself as much. Dieting is hard. Don’t make it harder by knowing that junk food is close-by.
High cholesterol and triglyceride levels increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Getting your cholesterol and triglyceride levels in an optimal range will help protect your heart and blood vessels. Cholesterol management may include lifestyle interventions (diet and exercise) as well as medications to get your total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides in an optimal range.
After the birth of Barrymore’s daughters, the actress intended to leave on-screen work behind. It wasn’t until after her 2016 divorce that she was approached with the opportunity to appear in Santa Clarita Diet. Barrymore says that she was initially hesitant to accept the offer—but she ended up taking the job regardless, and now says that it awakened her.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g Lewington, S; Clarke, R; Qzilbash, N; Peto, R; Collins, R (2002-12-14). "Age-specific relevance of usual blood pressure to vascular mortality: A meta-analysis of individual data for one million adults in 61 prospective studies". Lancet. London: Elsevier. 360 (9349): 1903–13. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)11911-8. PMID 12493255.

Honestly? We don't know. While TheMilitaryDiet.com offers plenty of information, including a section with frequently asked questions, blog, and alternative meal plans for vegetarians, there are no authors, experts, or webpage owners listed. And while the name implies a military connection, the page doesn't actually claim any ties to the armed forces. (MensHealth.com reached out to the website for more information and will update if and when we hear back.)
From the whole wheat toast, you’ll get plenty of carbohydrates, fiber, iron, Vitamin B-6, magnesium and calcium. You’re probably familiar with most of these vitamins and minerals. Calcium of course is important for healthy bones and teeth. Magnesium is also found in the bones; but is needed too for creating protein. Iron plays an important role in blood, specifically, it carries oxygen in the body (2). That’s why iron deficiencies can cause you to feel tired, as oxygen may move more slowly throughout your body. The peanut butter will fill you up with 8 grams of protein and healthy fats. Finally, both coffee and tea are full of antioxidants and caffeine to give you a kick start in energy. As a result, you can confidently choose either coffee or tea. If you want to obtain additional health benefits, try drinking green tea.
The food options available on the DASH diet closely mirror the eating plan recommended in the US Department of Agriculture’s MyPlate, with a focus on whole foods, such as fruit and veggies; fat-free or low-fat dairy; whole grains; and lean meats, like fish and poultry. (3) Meanwhile, the plan requires cutting back on, or preferably eliminating, processed foods, like sugary drinks and packaged snacks, and limiting red meat, which in excess has been linked to poorer heart health and heart failure, according to a study published in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. (4)
Numerous studies show wide-ranging health benefits of the DASH diet. A consistent body of research has found that DASH lowers blood pressure in people with high blood pressure but also normal blood pressure even without lowering sodium intake. [4] It can produce greater reductions in blood pressure if sodium is restricted to less than 2300 mg a day, and even more so with a 1500 mg sodium restriction. [5, 6] When compared with a standard American diet (e.g., high intake of red and processed meats, beverages sweetened with sugar, sweets, refined grains) DASH has also been found to lower serum uric acid levels in people with hyperuricemia, which places them at risk for a painful inflammatory condition called gout. [7] Because people with gout often also have high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases, DASH is optimal in improving all of these conditions.
Fruit is something that should be limited because of the high fructose content. It is natures candy. Yes fruit has vitamins and healthy nutrients, but you will be getting far more nutrients from your increase veggie intake. Choose nutrient dense, low carb fruits such as berries. Fruit such as pineapple, mango, and especially dried fruits, should be avoided. Also avoid ALL fruit juices. They have an incredibly high glycaemic index, which will make your insulin spike (and start storing fat again). “If you are overweight, fruit is not your friend”.

Wave bye bye to soft drinks. Even zero-calorie ones. Or perhaps, especially no-calorie, diet soft drinks. In recent years, consumption of these “diet” drinks has been linked to greater weight gain, not less. And more recently, researchers have noted a link between intake of these beverages and a greater risk of both stroke and dementia. That includes Alzheimer’s disease. Yes, you read that right: artificially-sweetened drink consumption is associated with a significantly greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Even sugar-laced soft drinks aren’t that dangerous.
But a large new study published on Wednesday in the journal BMJ challenges the conventional wisdom. It found that overweight adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms. After five months on the diet, their bodies burned roughly 250 calories more per day than people who ate a high-carb, low-fat diet, suggesting that restricting carb intake could help people maintain their weight loss more easily.

You have noticed something about this diet since starting it on and off back in 2002, I can drink one 32oz of 0 calorie 0 sugar Powerade or Gatorade per 3 day diet, pick a day to drink it on and you will be just fine. Make sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day. Drinking one of these help craves those hunger cravings and to keep those electrolytes flowing through you. I drink one because I workout a lot so I have to have some type of electrolytes flowing through me.


Jump up ^ Appel, Lawrence J.; Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Obarzanek, Eva; Swain, Janis F.; Miller, Edgar R.; Conlin, Paul R.; Erlinger, Thomas P.; Rosner, Bernard A. (2005-11-16). "Effects of protein, monounsaturated fat, and carbohydrate intake on blood pressure and serum lipids: results of the OmniHeart randomized trial". JAMA. 294 (19): 2455–2464. doi:10.1001/jama.294.19.2455. ISSN 1538-3598. PMID 16287956.
The show centers on a suburban family in Santa Clarita, California. Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant play Sheila and Joel Hammond, husband and wife real-estate agents with a teenage daughter. They live a standard, bland suburban life until one day, Sheila dies and is reborn as a zombie. Sheila's condition makes her more impulsive: She's more honest, aggressive, and her truest self — which helps her marriage with Joel.
The DASH diet and the control diet at the lower salt levels were both successful in lowering blood pressure, but the largest reductions in blood pressure were obtained by eating a combination of these two (i.e., a lower-salt version of the DASH diet). The effect of this combination at a sodium level of 1,500 mg/day was an average blood pressure reduction of 8.9/4.5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic). The hypertensive subjects experienced an average reduction of 11.5/5.7 mm Hg.[10] The DASH-sodium results indicate that low sodium levels correlated with the largest reductions in blood pressure for participants at both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive levels, with the hypertensive participants showing the greatest reductions in blood pressure overall.
Heller says offering practical advice can make following the DASH plan easier and longer lasting. The DASH dietary pattern isn't for the short term, she says; it's for life. "If a plan can't be sustained," she says, "why go to the trouble of trying to follow it in the first place?" She offers the following suggestions to help clients and patients follow the DASH diet:
Nut allergies are some of the most common allergies in the world. There are others that just don’t like the taste of peanut butter.  If that is the case then almond butter is the way to go.  For others, pumpkin butter,  sunflower-seed butter, chickpea hummus, soy butter, or unflavored bean dip are all great alternatives. Two tablespoons of unsalted/unflavored sunflower seeds will work as well.  Almond butter is the most common substitute.  Hummus and sunflower seed butter are popular as well.

While there’s still a lot of room for improvement, the military diet meal plan includes veggies daily like carrots, broccoli and green beans. You can also substitute these for other types of non-starchy veggies that you enjoy more, such as leafy greens/lettuces like spinach, tomatoes, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, asparagus, peppers or any other green vegetables. The same goes for bananas and apples; if you prefer, substitute these for other fruits, such as two kiwis, berries, papaya, pineapple, melon, or two small figs or apricots.
Sautéed carrots and onions. Sauté 1 medium onion, thinly sliced, in 1 tablespoon olive oil or canola oil. Add about 8 ounces sliced carrots, and continue to sauté until the carrots are soft. Add 1 thin pat of butter at the end. (Hints: Top the turkey with the sautéed carrots for extra flavor. If you like very soft carrots, microwave first before sautéing.)

Like most fad diets, the 3 Day Military Diet is extremely rigid with strict rules. Though it doesn't specifically rule out entire food groups, as a result of the rules most foods are off-limits. It therefore lacks variety. Though it doesn't promote unlimited consumption of anything, it does promote unhealthy, processed foods that are high in sugar, fat, and cholesterol. These include ice cream, hot dogs, and cheese.
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In 1972, Robert Atkins published Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution, which advocated the low-carbohydrate diet he had successfully used in treating patients in the 1960s (having developed the diet from a 1963 article published in JAMA).[71] The book met with some success, but, because of research at that time suggesting risk factors associated with excess fat and protein, it was widely criticized by the mainstream medical community as being dangerous and misleading, thereby limiting its appeal at the time.[72]
If you do this specific calorie deficit diet, then go back to eating how you used to, (which for starters, is probably more than 1200 kcal a day) of course you are going to put it back on in the following days off! Allow your stomach to shrink and only eat what you need, listen to your body. This diet (i did it for 4 months and lost 45 lbs) taught me to listen to my body, to feed it the right things when I was hungry and not just follow my emotions or eyes. It taught me to stop eating when I was full...and since my stomach was not so stretched out from over eating...full came quicker! It means I kept off the weight!
Heller says offering practical advice can make following the DASH plan easier and longer lasting. The DASH dietary pattern isn't for the short term, she says; it's for life. "If a plan can't be sustained," she says, "why go to the trouble of trying to follow it in the first place?" She offers the following suggestions to help clients and patients follow the DASH diet:
Eating like a Mediterranean is as much lifestyle as it is diet. Instead of gobbling your meal in front of the TV, slow down and sit down at the table with your family and friends to savor what you’re eating. Not only will you enjoy your company and your food, eating slowly allows you to tune in to your body’s hunger and fullness signals. You’re more apt to eat just until you’re satisfied than until you’re busting-at-the-seams full.
Your midday meal is crucial fuel for afternoon energy, so make it count. Grain bowls make a perfectly packable lunch and deliver a diverse offering of healthy ingredients, from quinoa to canned tuna or salmon to roasted veggies. Here, it’s all about convenience—add a protein boost to a crisp, leafy green salad with cannellini beans or chicken, then pack into a Mason jar.
If IMF seems too difficult for you, you might consider trying calorie/carb-cycling diets. Carb cycling is a type of diet plan that involves eating more carbohydrates (and sometimes calories in general) only on certain days of the week, but doing the opposite on the other days. Carb cycling increases your intake of carbohydrates only at the right time and in the right amounts, supporting your metabolism and providing you with energy without leading to excess carb/calorie intake that’s stored as fat. On lower-carb days, foods that are filling and have enough protein are the base of your meals, such as non-starchy veggies, grass-fed meats, eggs and healthy fats like avocado.
The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the eating habits of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s.[2] The principal aspects of this diet include proportionally high consumption of olive oil, legumes, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate wine consumption, and low consumption of non-fish meat products.[3]

Pumpkin is a starchy vegetable and carrots do indeed grow below the ground but aren’t as high in sugars as pumpkins. Take a look at this list of carbs in vegetables to see the comparisons. I also eat beetroots which are higher in carbs but they are so packed with nutrition, I allow it. Nothing is out of bounds, depending on your level of carb intake you want to reach.
During the 14 days of Phase 1, you will learn how to satisfy your hunger and, as a result, feel fuller longer. To regulate your blood sugar and help curb your cravings, avoid fruit and whole grains, which have a lot of natural sugar, and alcohol, which also contain sugars. That said, you can enjoy 2-3 servings of low-fat dairy per day. This would include 1 cup of skim milk or low-fat yogurt. Avoid regular or even fat-free cheese because they are often high in sodium.
Tomatoes are sweet, juicy, meaty, and your best source of the antioxidant lycopene, which may help lower your risk of stroke and various cancers. This recipe is simple: just scoop out the pulp and seeds from a half tomato and fill with a delicious stuffing of crumbled goat cheese, kalamata olives, garlic croutons, and some fresh herbs. At 200 calories per tomato, you'll want to make this dish again and again.

Skordalia is a Greek dip or sauce made with potatoes, garlic, and olive oil, among other healthful ingredients. Here, it's the base of a seafood dish. We used halibut, but you can sub in any fish of your choice. It's flavored with dried thyme, lemon juice and zest, and includes healthy ingredients like zucchini and vitamin C-rich red bell peppers.
“Most people don’t eat enough whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, foods rich in the nutrients that you need to support health on the DASH diet,” Ward says. These foods provide fiber, potassium and magnesium, which help control or prevent high blood pressure and also have other health benefits such as regulating blood and nerve functioning and supporting digestive health. The foods also provide a variety of other nutrients.
High cholesterol and triglyceride levels increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Getting your cholesterol and triglyceride levels in an optimal range will help protect your heart and blood vessels. Cholesterol management may include lifestyle interventions (diet and exercise) as well as medications to get your total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides in an optimal range.
Some of the below won’t work for everyone. You can always consult nutrition labels to make sure your military diet substitutes match the carbohydrates, fat, and protein of the foods that you are substituting. For example, if you want the diet to be vegan friendly you can substitute the cheddar cheese for non-dairy cheese. A handful of almonds might work as well. Not to beat a dead horse but, 3 day military diet substitutes are not encouraged. The below list is just for those that absolutely can’t or won’t eat what is on the meal plan.
Even if they can be included in a diet that leads to weight loss, eating empty calories like processed bread, peanut butter and ice cream are not ideal in terms of improving your health. A major drawback of most diets that focus too much on counting and limiting calories is that they don’t emphasize the importance of eating quality nutrient-dense foods.
If you look around the web, you’ll see that many people have taken on the challenge of a zero-carb diet, which involves eating only meat and fat. The downside of this diet is that it can be exceptionally high in saturated fat and contains no fiber, something that helps digestion, and no vegetables or fruit, which provide critical vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Considering that experts recommend talking to your doctor even before going on a ketogenic diet — and this is a much more severe form — you need to consult a medical professional before attempting the zero-carb diet!
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