DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and the diet was developed for a research study in the early 1990s.1 The purpose of the study was to identify a food-based strategy to lower blood pressure. Even though the original research was quite a long time ago, scientists recently conducted a meta-analysis for a DASH diet review to summarize how much blood pressure can be reduced by the DASH diet. The study found, on average, people reduce their blood pressure by 6.7 mmHg systolic and 3.5 mmHg diastolic in just two weeks. The more sodium is restricted, the lower blood pressure goes.
Best of all, you will see amazing results in a short amount of time. Your hips, thighs, and stomach will be thinner, the number on the scales will go down, and all those overwhelming food cravings will be gone! Just imagine losing weight while still enjoying many of your favorite foods. With the diet, you can dine on mouth-watering foods like Chicken en Papillote, Shrimp Louis, and even Chocolate Sponge Cake and still lose the weight!

“It wasn’t designed as a weight-loss program, but it can help you shed pounds and keep them off while managing blood glucose levels, improving HDL levels and reducing LDL levels,” says Elizabeth Ward, RD, author and blogger at betteristhenewperfect.com. “In doing so, the DASH diet reduces the risk for several chronic conditions, such as heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and stroke.”
Plus, it was hard to give in to those “maybe this isn’t so bad—I should definitely still eat it” thoughts that crept up when the "yes" and "no" foods were clearly defined. Because I had to be strict, it was awesome to have no ambiguity about what I could and could not eat. Plus, I was experiencing a bit of mental fog (I got on the wrong train twice during the 14 days, something I have never done!) from how tired I was from the lack of carbs, so I appreciated having everything laid out in black and white. Speaking of…
To follow the plan, one must decide their calorie level and then divide the suggested servings of each food group throughout the day. This requires meal planning ahead of time. The NHLBI guide provides many tips on how to incorporate DASH foods and to lower sodium intake; a one-day sample menu following a 2300 mg sodium restriction and a 1500 mg sodium restriction; and one week’s worth of recipes. The NHLBI also publishes an online database of “heart healthy” recipes.
This is a very good diet if you have a lot of motivation. I have been fortunate that several people in my family and friend are also on this diet. My husband has already lost 25lbs in a month and I have lost 11lbs.The food is easy to eat maybe a little expensive and hard to find at times but good. I still have more to lose so I plan to stay on the diet for a while. Then there is a final phase to teach you how to eat the rest of your life.
Because the Military Diet discourages substitutions, some may be led to believe that specific food choices have a “magical” effect to enhance weight loss. The truth is, there’s nothing special or unique about the combination of these foods over the three-day period. In fact, choosing different foods with similar macronutrient profiles would provide the exact results.
No. Alcoholic drinks are high in calories. Save your cocktail for when you’re off the diet, or on the 4 days off. Even when you’re not on the diet, if you’re interested in maintaining your weight, you should avoid certain types of alcohol. For example, steer clear of sugary alcoholic drinks such as long island iced teas and margaritas. The sugar adds in a lot of calories that will promote weight gain. Instead, go for a gin and tonic or vodka with soda water and lime. Red wine is also a great choice. You should also try to lay off beer if you’re hoping to maintain or lose weight. If you’re really craving a beer, go for a dark beer like Guinness which is rich in antioxidants.

2. Simple carbohydrates (high glycemic load foods, or foods that are not part of a type 2 diabetes diet plan because they raise blood sugar levels) are processed foods, and don't contain other nutrients to slow down sugar absorption and thus these foods can raise blood sugar dangerously fast. Many simple carbohydrates are easily recognized as "white foods."
When the flesh-eating zombie horror-comedy returns March 23, we find Joel (Timothy Olyphant) and Sheila (Drew Barrymore) attempting to maintain a some kind of normalcy in their lives while hiding the fact that people are going missing in the Californian suburb as Sheila feeds her need for blood and guts and they search for a cure for the zombie virus.
Shelby Kinnaird, publisher of Diabetic Foodie (http://www.diabeticfoodie.com/), was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in 1999. Her last A1C was 6.4%. You can find her on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/diabeticFoodie/), Twitter (https://twitter.com/diabeticFoodie), Pinterest (https://www.pinterest.com/diabeticfoodie/), and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/thediabeticfoodie/).
Joel and Sheila stake out Loki and debate the possibility that he was turned into a zombie. With no resolution they go to a party at Dan’s house and Joel has to lie to Dan about Loki. Sheila realizes she left a pen with her contact information at Loki’s house. Abby and Eric have a hard time recovering from the kiss. Dan wants Joel to kill another guy who he claims is a bad guy but when Sheila goes to kill him it turns out to be the guy Lisa is having an affair with and she does not kill him. Abby and Eric plant a flash bang in Dan’s rose garden to freak him out. In the process they find a stash of money concluding Dan is a dirty cop. Joel runs into Loki’s friends and is held hostage. They knock him out but he is OK and he finds the pen. Joel and Sheila decide they are going to do everything together moving forward. Joel confronts Dan telling him he will not be killing people for him anymore. They get into a fight and Joel kills him with a shovel.
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