This diet has introduced structure into my eating and has helped me better plan what I am having. Day 1 was rough due to the lack of caffeine even though we can have 2 cups of coffee that day but I didn’t feel hungry at all. In fact, throughout my 3 days I haven’t felt hungry at all. It was more of my craving for the fatty unhealthy food I was so use to eating before. I am on the last stretch of my 3rd day, still have my ice cream to eat. Before starting this diet I was extremely skeptical. I was worried that the amount of food or lack there of was going to leave me feeling hungry, weak and tired. I have tried other diets in the past and got results but not enough to keep my motivation. I’m not going to lie to you and say these past 3 days have been easy. It definitely took every ounce of will power and I’m looking forward to eating my 1500 calories tomorrow. I have been able to sleep better and I still have energy to take on my day as a full time working mom.
I encourage everyone to share their experiences and successes in the comment area below. Please feel free to cheer each other on, give helpful tips, make friends, and just have some fun! I hope everyone finds this page useful and that it helps you in your weight loss journey. (As usual, please use good manners and avoid rude comments. Keep it friendly and be polite!
Starvation mode is when you restrict calories over a period of time and lose weight quickly, causing your body’s metabolism to slow down. This is a natural side effect of just about any type of weight loss. The less you weigh, the less body tissue your body has to maintain and so your metabolism may drop a bit. Think of it this way: if you carry a backpack up a hill, you burn more calories than if you walk up without a backpack. Extra weight that you carry, even if it’s some extra fat, causes your body to work harder and burn more calories. Another effect of starvation mode is that your body prefers to preserve fat and consume muscle in an effort to help you survive. However, the Military Diet minimizes the effects of the so-called “starvation mode” by including plenty of protein intake in the form of eggs, cottage cheese, tuna, meats and peanut butter. Research supports this strategy, saying that you can preserve both your muscle and metabolism while dieting. In addition, because the diet is only 3 days, after which you return to a more acceptable caloric intake, your body, muscles and metabolism won’t suffer too much.
Dinner on day 2 is also heavy on meat, this time in the form of hot dogs, which are a source of protein and fat. You’ll also get Vitamin B-6, Vitamin B-2, iron, calcium and sodium from the hot dogs. The broccoli, carrots and banana are where you’ll get lots more vitamins and minerals- including all the Vitamin C and A that you need for the day. In addition, they contain potassium, iron, calcium, fiber and Vitamin B-6. Don’t forget your ice cream!

If you do decide to head for the South Beach, take Angelone's advice: Commit to the rules in Phase 1, including no alcohol. Keep a food record to see what you eat and when, so you can learn to change habits. Avoid overly processed foods. Think twice before buying into the diet's meal plan—the costs can add up. Stay well hydrated and keep up with exercise.


Today’s leading health organizations are heartily endorsing the DASH Diet for the informed health-conscious diner. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet has been recommended by the National Kidney Foundation and approved by The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, The American Heart Association, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and also forms the basis for the USDA MyPyramid.


Dairy has never been a staple of my diet. I eat cheese only occasionally, and I don’t really crave it like many people do. Low-fat dairy plays a central role in reaping South Beach Diet results, and I was game to try out eating it for two weeks, but it just cemented for me that yogurt is bland and horrible—and in no way filling or satisfying. But what I really couldn’t get down with were the cheese swaps.

The South Beach Diet is generally safe if you follow it as outlined in official South Beach Diet books and websites. However, if you severely restrict your carbohydrates, you may experience problems from ketosis. Ketosis occurs when you don't have enough sugar (glucose) for energy, so your body breaks down stored fat, causing ketones to build up in your body. Side effects from ketosis can include nausea, headache, mental fatigue and bad breath, and sometimes dehydration and dizziness.
You may have any kind of tuna or meat that you choose. Fresh or canned tuna doesn't make a difference for the 3 Day Military Diet. You can also choose between beef and turkey dogs; but it's recommended to avoid hot dogs from mixed meat sources. Since hot dogs aren't typically a nutritious choice, if you are concerned with your health and avoiding highly-processed food then another food option may be better for you. Just make sure that your meat or meat substitution for the 2 hot dogs contains between 250 and 350 calories, as that is the approximate calorie count in 2 hotdogs.

Here we present a case of hyperglycemic ketoacidosis associated with a low carbohydrate diet. The South Beach Diet is a popular diet plan which primarily relies on the restriction of dietary carbohydrates to achieve weight loss [1]. Our patient strictly adhered to 10 to 15 grams of carbohydrate per day for 3 weeks prior to presentation and lost 16 pounds. He was following the most stringent form of this diet, namely that being the form in which total carbohydrate consumption is limited to less than 20 grams daily. On presentation, our patient was felt to be in diabetic ketoacidosis but, interestingly, the patient was subsequently euglycemic without therapy and, even after two years of follow up, remained asymptomatic and euglycemic.
I tried cottage cheese for the first time in my life. Someone who shall remain nameless told me that it tastes like what you flavor it with, and she suggested maybe some cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice. Well, I can tell you wholeheartedly that cottage cheese tastes like lumpy-ass cheese, and if you put pumpkin pie spice on it, you pretty much create an insult to Thanksgiving.

If IMF seems too difficult for you, you might consider trying calorie/carb-cycling diets. Carb cycling is a type of diet plan that involves eating more carbohydrates (and sometimes calories in general) only on certain days of the week, but doing the opposite on the other days. Carb cycling increases your intake of carbohydrates only at the right time and in the right amounts, supporting your metabolism and providing you with energy without leading to excess carb/calorie intake that’s stored as fat. On lower-carb days, foods that are filling and have enough protein are the base of your meals, such as non-starchy veggies, grass-fed meats, eggs and healthy fats like avocado.

The Military Diet is a strict, short-term plan that requires drastically reducing your caloric intake. The restrictions work over a three-day period, and then you take four days off from the diet. Some users participate in the Military Diet on an occasional basis, while others might do three days on and four days off for a month at a time. In fact, the Military Diet website touts that people who follow the plan for 30 days could “lose up to 30 lbs,” though registered dietitians strongly advise against doing so. (More on that later.)

The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition.

Each year, US News & World Report ranks the best diets based on expert advice in areas such as ease of compliance, weight loss results, and effectiveness against CVD and diabetes. The DASH diet has come in at number one for seven years in a row. So why isn't DASH the dietary darling, with thousands of consumers clamoring to get the latest information as they do for the likes of Paleo, Atkins, the Alkaline Diet, or Whole30?


I was going through some photos on our Ipad one day and I thought to myself, "Oh my . . . who is that lady sitting on our couch?" Looking closer, I realized it was ME! It was heartbreaking that I didn't even recognize myself. My three year old son had candidly taken a picture of me that evening. I'm so glad he did because that was the turning point for me. I had to do something. Only I can change this, right?
The information shared on our websites is information developed solely from internal experts on the subject matter, including medical advisory boards, who have developed guidelines for our patient content. This material does not constitute medical advice. It is intended for informational purposes only. No one associated with the National Kidney Foundation will answer medical questions via e-mail. Please consult a physician for specific treatment recommendations.
A 30-year-old Caucasian male on a low carbohydrate diet presented with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. The patient's bicarbonate level was 12 and he had hyperglycemia and ketonemia. He was felt to be in diabetic ketoacidosis and was started on intravenous insulin and isotonic saline infusions and responded well. Following cessation of insulin therapy, the patient remained normoglycemic for the remainder of his hospital stay. He later admitted to having been on the South Beach Diet, which is a low carbohydrate diet, for the three weeks prior to his presentation and during which time he had lost 16 pounds. On admission his BMI was 27.1. On presentation, the patient was felt to be in diabetic ketoacidosis but, interestingly, he was subsequently euglycemic without therapy. Following discharge, the patient discontinued the diet plan and he has remained asymptomatic and euglycemic over the following two years.
And the beating, undead heart of the show is Joel and Sheila's marriage, a truly admirable relationship that is one of the few I would actually be comfortable to label #goals. The husband and wife are in constant communication and provide each other with unconditional support. They're also clearly fumbling through both parenting and zombification – which Abby never hesitates to point out – but always with affection.

Eric helps Sheila reattach her finger and lets it slip about the tray incident. Sheila and Joel confront Abby, but she feels no remorse. Eric goes undercover at Japopo's but the owner won’t disclose his clam distributor. Out of concern, Sheila and Joel force Abby to apologize to Christian only to discover that his parents are Chris and Christa, who try to blackmail the Hammonds with threats of Abby's expulsion. Eric breaks into Japopo's back office. The Hammonds go to Principal Novak's house where Sheila and Joel tell Abby how difficult it’s been juggling all their problems and ask Abby to help them out. Abby apologizes to Novak but gets expelled anyway. He accidentally slams Sheila's finger in his door and she pretends to be hurt, forcing Novak to un-expel Abby. Eric calls Joel to show him that Japopo's used a different clam distributor, Ruby's Clams, the day that the Hammonds ate there before Sheila's transformation. Sheila pulls into the parking lot for an investor meeting but Carl shows up unexpectedly. She closes her eyes and wakes up 12 hours later at home with blood on her face and a heart in her hand.

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