South Beach Diet results are definitely not magic or easy to come by, says registered dietitian Jessica Crandall, R.D., a certified diabetes educator and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Crandall likes that phase one focuses on decreasing sugar and eating lean proteins and high-fiber foods, but she still isn’t a fan of cutting out all carbs, especially ones from healthy, whole foods. “The first phase is extreme. It’s not my favorite,” she says. “It isn’t really nutritionally complete for your body to be at that low of a carbohydrate level. Not only can we become nutrient-deprived, but we also can feel pretty horrible on that phase of the diet.”


Moderation is advised with regard to consuming alcohol and using some drugs. Alcohol inhibits glycogenesis in the liver and some drugs inhibit hunger symptoms. This, with impaired judgment, memory and concentration caused by some drugs can lead to hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who take insulin or tablets such as sulphonylureas should not, therefore, consume alcohol on an empty stomach but take some starchy food (such as bread or potato crisps) at the same time as consumption of alcohol.[citation needed]
Trigylcerides are fatty molecules that travel in the bloodstream. Excess sugar and fat can increase triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are also manufactured in the liver. The body uses triglycerides for energy, but excess triglycerides are a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, and obesity. Many lifestyle factors can influence triglyceride levels.

A low carbohydrate eating pattern focuses on non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli, green beans, kale, salad greens and protein foods like meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts and seeds, fats (oils, butter, olives and avocado). Highly processed carbohydrate foods and grains are limited or avoided in this eating pattern.  There is no standard at this time for the grams of carbohydrate in a low-carb eating pattern and research continues to look at the effects of this eating pattern on diabetes. Work with a registered dietitian who can talk with you about your current eating habits and help you figure out the plan that will work best for you.  


Some people can't eat grapefruit because it interacts with certain medications. Others just don't care for it. Either way, don't substitute it with oranges or orange juice. Oranges won't give your body the same alkalizing effect that grapefruit produces. In fact, oranges promote more acidic pH balances. The more acidic the pH balance, the easier it is for the body to store fat.
It's important to note that liquids are also restricted on the diet, and water and herbal teas are the only approved beverages, explains registered dietician Beth Warren. It's okay to drink coffee on the first day—but sugar, creamers, and artificial sweeteners are off limits, meaning you'll only be able to use stevia in your coffee (if needed). Alcohol, however, is definitely off limits, especially since wine and beer tend to contain a lot of calories, says Virgin.
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For the first three days, the diet consists of three distinct meal plans. For the first day, breakfast consists of half a grapefruit, a slice of whole-wheat toast with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, and a cup of caffeinated black tea or coffee. If you can't drink it black, it's recommended you sweeten it with a natural sugar substitute, like Stevia. For lunch, have half a cup of tuna (you can buy 3 oz or 5 oz cannes of cooked tuna, or prepare it yourself), one slice of whole-wheat toast, and a second cup of black coffee or tea. Dinner is the more filling meal, consisting of 3 oz of meat, one cup of green beans, half a banana, one small apple, and one cup of vanilla ice cream for dessert.
The single-camera series premiered on February 3, 2017.[4] The first season, consisting of 10 episodes, has received generally positive reviews, with critics praising the cast and premise, but criticizing the number of graphic scenes. On March 29, 2017, it was announced that Netflix renewed the series for a second season, which premiered on March 23, 2018.[5][6] On May 8, 2018, the series was renewed for a 10-episode third season set to premiere in 2019.[7]
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