Here’s the hard truth—the Military Diet is the quintessential definition of a “fad diet,” and it’s an eating plan that I would not recommend or advise anyone to follow. Not only does it provide inadequate nutrients, but the diet’s food choices and food group servings do not follow the guidelines that research suggests to maintain health and prevent disease.
Scroll through the #militarydietresults hashtag on Instagram and you can see plenty of people trying the meal plan out. Most report being down at least a couple of pounds and reducing their body fat percentage as well. And checking out their pictures, it's pretty crazy the progess they can make with just a few meals and a few days. Want to see what we mean? We asked Instagram users @healthyhappydays_ and @sweatherly816 to share their results with us. Check out their military diet results in the video below.
Most recently, researchers looked at the DASH diets effect on cholesterol values as well. It turns out, those looking to control blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels have even more reason to try the DASH; the DASH diet significantly lowered total and LDL-cholesterol (referred to as the "bad" cholesterol) levels in subjects with borderline-high and high cholesterol.

As mentioned above, the military diet is really nothing groundbreaking or special, just another low-calorie diet that can promote weight loss due to restricting how much someone eats. If you’re hoping to lose weight in a healthier, more sustainable way then I’d recommend considering a moderate ketogenic diet (a very low-carb diet that helps the body burn fat efficiently), incorporating intermittent fasting into your lifestyle, and perhaps trying other weight loss boosters, such as carb-cycling or high intensity interval training (HIIT). The ketogenic diet in particular can be helpful for lowering appetite and promoting steady weight loss. The keto diet works by severely limiting carbohydrate consumption and reducing the body’s energy supply, which then forces fat to become the primary energy source.
South Beach Diet results are definitely not magic or easy to come by, says registered dietitian Jessica Crandall, R.D., a certified diabetes educator and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Crandall likes that phase one focuses on decreasing sugar and eating lean proteins and high-fiber foods, but she still isn’t a fan of cutting out all carbs, especially ones from healthy, whole foods. “The first phase is extreme. It’s not my favorite,” she says. “It isn’t really nutritionally complete for your body to be at that low of a carbohydrate level. Not only can we become nutrient-deprived, but we also can feel pretty horrible on that phase of the diet.”
Lucky for me, I did South Beach while it was freezing outside. I’m usually a self-appointed lower-middle-class socialite, but none of my friends wanted to leave their place during the cold snap, so I was able to stay in and cook and sleep. The handful of times that I did go out, I found the diet challenging. There’s something nice about having a few drinks at a birthday party or over a delicious meal.
If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables.
This diet was amazing for me. I lost over 10 pounds! I followed the diet and did hot yoga. Although there is the occasional review where users of the 3 Day Military Diet claim they haven’t lost any weight at all, the majority lose at least a few pounds. Considering that on average by following a healthy diet and exercising it’s normal to lose about 1 pound a week, the 3 Day Military Diet really speeds up weight loss. People also generally report that restricting themselves for 3 days is much easier than watching their diet over a much longer period of time. Overall, the consensus of those who’ve tried the diet is very positive.
In the 1950s, the American Diabetes Association, in conjunction with the U.S. Public Health Service, introduced the "exchange scheme". This allowed people to swap foods of similar nutrition value (e.g., carbohydrate) for another. For example, if wishing to have more than normal carbohydrates for dessert, one could cut back on potatoes in one's first course. The exchange scheme was revised in 1976, 1986, and 1995.[10]
Honestly? We don't know. While TheMilitaryDiet.com offers plenty of information, including a section with frequently asked questions, blog, and alternative meal plans for vegetarians, there are no authors, experts, or webpage owners listed. And while the name implies a military connection, the page doesn't actually claim any ties to the armed forces. (MensHealth.com reached out to the website for more information and will update if and when we hear back.)
^ Jump up to: a b c Emadian A, Andrews RC, England CY, Wallace V, Thompson JL (November 2015). "The effect of macronutrients on glycaemic control: a systematic review of dietary randomised controlled trials in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes in which there was no difference in weight loss between treatment groups". The British Journal of Nutrition. 114 (10): 1656–66. doi:10.1017/S0007114515003475. PMC 4657029. PMID 26411958.
I was hoping to find independent views as to how healthy the prepared meals are. Your input about sodium levels was helpful, but do you have any other points to add? In an age when processed foods are considered taboo, I’m curious about any considerations that come with eating these prepared meals. I’m not quite finished with my first month, but I’m down 17lbs already, and I’d like to keep this going!
However, it's safe to say that no one really knows the origin of the military diet, Yurechko said, as it is certainly not approved by the military. But if you are still a tad bit curious about taking this diet out for a spin, we spoke to some experts on the subject to make sure you have all the ins-and-outs. Here are some takeaways to keep in mind.
TheDietDynamo.com is a professional research and review team, and on our website you may find affiliate links for which we could be compensated for by clicking on them. The owner of this website is also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties.
While not specifically recommended, grass-fed beef and buffalo would fit within these parameters. Grass-fed beef has a very different composition than conventional grain-fed beef. Grass-fed beef is high in omega-3s and is more similar to fish, nutritionally. Grain-fed red meat is high in omega 6s and saturated fat, both of which are promote inflammation and contribute to heart disease, high blood pressure, and obesity. Red meat that is not grass-fed is not allowed.
An important emphasis of the South Beach Diet is controlling hunger by eating before it strikes. To that end, the South Beach Diet includes three different phases. (3) Phase 1 is one week long and aims to “reset your body” to help burn fat and increase your metabolism, as well as reduce sugar and starch cravings. Phase 2 is for steady weight loss, where you add in good carbs to your diet. Phase 3 is the weight-maintenance phase, where you learn to maintain your new weight without deprivation or hunger, according to the South Beach Diet website.

The diet I recommend in my book Healthy Aging: A Lifelong Guide to your Physical and Spiritual Well-Being is similar to the DASH diet with the addition of omega-3 fatty acids and natural anti-inflammatory spices such as turmeric and ginger. Both are similar to the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, crusty breads, whole grains, and olive oil as well as more fish and legumes and less meat and poultry than the typical Western diet contains. Whether you’re trying to lower blood pressure or simply eat well, you can’t go wrong with the DASH diet, or with the alternatives mentioned above.
A vegetarian eating pattern is based on plant foods, such as vegetables, fruit, whole grains, nuts, seeds, beans and meat substitutes with little or no animal products. The vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, minerals and fiber, and lower in saturated fat and cholesterol. There are several types of vegetarian eating patterns, and they vary in terms of what is included:
The first stage lasts for two weeks and is expected to reduce your desire for sugar and artificial starch and trigger weight loss.  The goal is to reduce fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Emphasis is placed on the consumption of fiber rich, nutrient-dense food. You may eat meat, fish, chicken, vegetable fiber, lean cheese, eggs, fat-free dairy products, healthy, unsaturated fatty acids that can, for example, be found in avocado, nuts, and seeds. Use oil for cooking, for example, olive oil, which contains high levels polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Don’t be afraid of fruit! Yes, fruits have sugar, but they also have fiber and beneficial nutrients like potassium and vitamin C. One serving is approximately 1 cup of berries or 1/2 a large apple or banana. I’ve found the fruits that work best for me are blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, apples, pears, and oranges. Eating fruit with a meal works better for me than eating it on its own. I consider it dessert!
The eggs are probably the hardest part for military diet substitutes.  Eggs are great. But eggs can be substituted for 2 slices of bacon or 4 ounces of lean ham. They aren’t great substitutions for the 3 Day Military Diet because of the fat mismatch. Peanut butter or almond butter almost work better and will also work for the vegetarians in the group.

DASH was first introduced at a meeting of the American Heart Association in 1996 and later published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997. [2] The DASH trial randomly assigned 456 people to different diets to test the effects of dietary patterns on lowering blood pressure. The authors surmised that eating a diet with many different foods with blood pressure-lowering nutrients would show a greater effect on blood pressure than eating single nutrients, such as found in supplements or in a limited diet. Three diets were tested: 1) a control diet, or a standard American diet, 2) a fruits and vegetables diet, similar to the control diet but providing more fruits and vegetables and less snacks and sweets, and 3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, and low-fat dairy foods with reduced amounts of saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol. The last two diets were richer in nutrients associated with lower blood pressure, such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, fiber, and protein. All three diets provided about 3000 mg sodium, which is more than the recommended amount from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans but less than the average sodium intake for Americans. [3]
The DASH-Sodium study was conducted following the end of the original DASH study to determine whether the DASH diet could produce even better results if it were low in salt and also to examine the effects of different levels of sodium in people eating the DASH diet.[2] The researchers were interested in determining the effects of sodium reduction when combined with the DASH diet as well as the effects of the DASH diet when at three levels of sodium intake. The DASH-Sodium trial was conducted from September 1997 through November 1999. Like the previous study, it was based on a large sample (412 participants) and was a multi-center, randomized, outpatient feeding study where the subjects were given all their food.[12] The participants were adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension (average systolic of 120 to 159 mm Hg & average diastolic of 80 to 95 mm Hg) and were randomly assigned to one of two diet groups.[10] The two randomized diet groups were the DASH diet and a control diet that mirrored a “typical American diet”, and which was somewhat low in key nutrients such as potassium, magnesium and calcium. The DASH diet was the same as in the previous DASH study. After being assigned to one of these two diets, the participants were given diets that differed by 3 distinct levels of sodium content, corresponding to 3,000 mg, 2,400 mg or 1,500 mg/day (higher, intermediate or lower), in random order, for 30 consecutive days each.[10] During the two-week run-in phase, all participants ate the high sodium control diet. The 30-day intervention phase followed, in which subjects ate their assigned diets at each of the aforementioned sodium levels (high, intermediate and low) in random order, in a crossover design.[12] During the 30-day dietary intervention phase, each participant therefore consumed his or her assigned diet (either DASH or control) at all three sodium levels.[dubious – discuss]
The DASH plan was originally developed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension), but it may also reduce the risk of other diseases, including diabetes. It may have the additional benefit of helping you lose weight. People following the DASH plan are encouraged to reduce portion sizes and eat foods rich in blood pressure-lowering nutrients, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium.
TheDietDynamo.com is a professional research and review team, and on our website you may find affiliate links for which we could be compensated for by clicking on them. The owner of this website is also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties.

People who develop diabetes when they are over 40 frequently develop diabetes in part because they are overweight. Being overweight makes it more difficult for their bodies to use insulin to convert food into energy. For this reason, many patients with diabetes also have weight loss as a goal. Because each gram of fat contains 9 calories (while a gram of protein or carbohydrate contains only 4 calories), fat gram counting as a means of losing weight becomes an additional nutritional tool for many patients.
Military diet-approved foods aren't what you'd typically think of as "diet" fare, including hot dogs, toast, ice cream, and canned tuna, says registered dietitian Brooke Alpert. See the full breakdown of the diet meals below. These same meals are prescribed for everyone observing the diet and are carefully planned out so you don't overindulge or stray off the diet (since you can only eat the foods recommended below), says Alpert.

On the South Beach Diet, you get to that point in three phases, the first of which involves a cutthroat elimination of all carbs for two weeks. White rice and baked goods were out, of course, but so were natural, healthy-for-you sources like fruits. The book says the process is meant to help a person rid herself of sugar cravings and also initiate “early rapid weight loss” to inspire the person to stick with it. The second phase includes the slow reintroduction of foods like whole grains until the person’s goal weight is reached, while the third phase is when the diet has become a lifestyle that helps her maintain that weight.

Santa Clarita Diet, by contrast, rejects hate and the politics of hate. Joel, confronted with zombies, is in every way the opposite of the survivalist NRA machismo wet dream. When he wields a gun, it’s a tiny little girly thing, and he can’t even bring himself to shoot a zombie with it through a silk pillow. He’s a good man not because he has the stomach to do the cold-hearted thing, but because he doesn’t.
As a self-described “nutrition nerd,” I couldn’t help but analyze the first three days of menus provided using my nutrient analysis software. You’ll see the daily totals at the bottom of each day, and while I can’t describe the intake as “good”, “ideal” or “healthy,” the data was slightly better than I expected. (Or perhaps, I really wasn’t sure what to expect from this very odd combination of foods!)
Lunch on day 1 is packed with protein, fulfilling about 60% of your daily protein intake requirements just in the tuna. The tuna also contributes other vitamins including Vitamin A, B-12, B-6 and minerals including magnesium and iron. Vitamin B-12 is an important vitamin often found in fish that plays an important role in the creation of new cells. It’s also important for nerve function. (1) The bread offers carbohydrates and plenty of fiber.
Tasmin recently returned home from university 12 pounds heavier! Her experience is typical of the returning college student who’s gained their “freshman fifteen.” She decided to give the 3 Day Military Diet a try to see if it would help her lose some of the extra weight. Follow her journey through this video. In the vlog, you’ll see how she’s feeling, how she did with the meals and of course – her results! Tasmin was upbeat throughout the diet, saying she powered through it even though it was a bit tough at times. As you’ll see, she exercised while on the diet and also spread out some of the foods, using some parts of meals as snacks. She did well on the diet and lost a total of 6 pounds!

Make water and unsweetened tea your beverages of choice. Once a coffee drinker, I switched to green tea when I was diagnosed with diabetes. Why? I can drink hot tea without sweetener, but not coffee. Plus I reap the health benefits of green tea. Get soda (regular and diet) out of your life for good. Alcohol can be okay for some people, depending on what medications they take. However, I’ve found that it’s much harder to control my blood glucose when I drink. So, for the most part, I don’t.


TheDietDynamo.com is a professional research and review team, and on our website you may find affiliate links for which we could be compensated for by clicking on them. The owner of this website is also a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon properties.
As with other types of extremely low-calorie diets, regaining the weight is almost guaranteed as soon as you stop the diet. “My own advice,” says Rothenberg: “Don't compromise for a big event! That often leads to weight gain and binge eating. If you want to change your diet, change your lifestyle. Studies actually show that ‘safe weight loss’ results in 1 to 2 lbs per week only,” citing recommendations from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.” And that still is hard work,” she adds. Fad diets like the Military Diet put you at risk for regaining weight that is lost from muscle and water in particular.
As you’re planning your exercise routine- try to keep it varied. Why? A mix of cardio and strength training is best, both for burning calories and building muscle. Unfortunately, many people only focus on cardio, which is a start, but including strength training will make you appear even slimmer as the pounds drop off. In addition, muscle burns more calories than fat when you’re at rest, which means that in the long-term you’ll burn even more calories.
The 3 Day Military Diet is 3 days. It works like this: You follow the 3-day meal plan and then follow a more flexible diet for 4 days. During the 4 days off, it’s best to eat a diet of about 1500 calories per day. Then, you can repeat the cycle or stop dieting altogether. To maintain weight loss, it’s always best if you follow a healthy diet- free of processed foods and rich in whole grains, fruits and vegetables.
When Anne puts it all together, she tracks Joel and Sheila to the desert where they’re attempting to eulogize Gary and send him off to the great real estate development in the sky. He has decided he wants to die, so they’re trying to honor his wishes, but when it comes right down to it, they can’t shoot him because he’s their friend. And this marks the third time in the episode I cried.
^ Jump up to: a b c Chobanian, Aram; Bakris, George; Black, Henry; Cushman, William; Green, Lee; Izzo Jr, Joseph; Jones, Daniel; Materson, Barry; et al. (2003). Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. 42. Bethesda: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. p. 1206. doi:10.1161/01.HYP.0000107251.49515.c2. ISSN 0194-911X. PMID 14656957. Retrieved 2011-12-28.
One day, as I was browsing on Pinterest, I noticed a link to this article. I was thinking, "WOW! Is this for real? It's probably just another diet that won't work for me." After reading into it further, I decided to give it a try. I'm so glad that I did and that I stayed committed. I never gave up no matter how hungry I was. It changed my life in every way! Now, I don't avoid mirrors anymore. I am getting rid of clothes that are too big, rather than too small. I feel better mentally, physically, and emotionally. I have confidence now that I've never carried with me before! I'm healthier, and just feel better all the way around; more than I have in my entire life! Another thing that makes this experience even better for me is that I just received my lab results from my physician yesterday, and they are better than they have ever been!

The South Beach Diet's program differs from other low-carb diets in that it restricts saturated fats and high-sugar carbs. The first two-week phase of the diet focuses on maintaining your blood sugar levels and eliminating cravings for sweets and "bad" carbs. Such foods include bread, rice, fruit and baked goods. The second phase introduces some carbs, including pasta, rice and some fruits, back into your diet. The final, indefinite stage involves continuing to make healthy eating choices to maintain your health and target weight.
A 30-year-old Caucasian male without significant past medical history presented with a two day history of nausea, vomiting and diffuse abdominal pain. The patient denied use of any medications (prescription or nonprescription) or any illicit substances. He did admit to occasional ethanol ingestion stating that he consumed four alcoholic beverages (approximately 0.6 ounces ethanol each) the night prior to the onset of symptoms. The patient had a family history of diabetes mellitus type 2 on both the paternal and maternal side.
Plus, it was hard to give in to those “maybe this isn’t so bad—I should definitely still eat it” thoughts that crept up when the "yes" and "no" foods were clearly defined. Because I had to be strict, it was awesome to have no ambiguity about what I could and could not eat. Plus, I was experiencing a bit of mental fog (I got on the wrong train twice during the 14 days, something I have never done!) from how tired I was from the lack of carbs, so I appreciated having everything laid out in black and white. Speaking of…
Still, the Military Diet isn’t associated with the military at all. It also doesn’t follow the principles used in the actual military. In fact, as one review published in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences that examined of nutrition in the military stated, “Nutrition and the military are fundamentally entwined.” (1) Historically, a lack of a balanced diet has led to poor military performance.
Now many patients are being taught to focus on how many total grams of carbohydrate they can eat throughout the day at each meal and snack, and still keep their blood glucose under good control. Well-controlled blood glucose is a top priority because other research studies have concluded that all people with diabetes can cut their risk of developing diabetes complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney and eye disease, nerve damage, and more, by keeping their blood glucose as closely controlled as possible.

According to Katherine Zeratsky, dietician, and nutritionist, your kidneys “decide whether to hold on to water. If you’ve had too much salt the night before, then your kidneys will hold on to more water to dilute or correct that salty imbalance…then they flush it all out.” Your kidneys also able to restore your salt balance naturally on their own. According to Zeratsky any extra water stored in your tissues or blood vessels often shows up in your fingers, toes, or lower legs.
The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan incorporated more fruits and vegetables, low fat or nonfat dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduced systolic blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called "pre-hypertension"). Those with hypertension dropped by 11 and 6 mm Hg, respectively. These changes in blood pressure occurred with no changes in body weight. The DASH dietary pattern is adjusted based on daily caloric intake ranging from 1,600 to 3,100 dietary calories.[2]
A military gentleman who attended our church some years back introduced me to this diet. He said that military recruits use this diet when they need to get in shape quickly. Since then I’ve done extensive research and heard from countless people who have tried this plan. Combined with my own personal trial and error, the diet that follows is carefully tested and includes advice to help you succeed. Feel confident and see the results for yourself!

You don’t have to avoid carbs entirely, but you do have to be careful about how many you eat at one time. The best choices are carbs that contain a lot of fiber like beans, whole grains, starchy vegetables, and fruit. I try to eat less than 40g carb per meal and that’s more than many other people with diabetes eat. Experiment to see what your body can tolerate.
Thank you so much for creating such a convenient layout! The shopping list and substitute options are perfectly stated and organized and made starting this process so easy. I'm so excited to try it and hopefully see results! I've lost 25 pounds on normal diet and exercise (a combination of paleo and calorie counting), but I'm looking to change it up with slightly faster results. Thanks again!

The diet I recommend in my book Healthy Aging: A Lifelong Guide to your Physical and Spiritual Well-Being is similar to the DASH diet with the addition of omega-3 fatty acids and natural anti-inflammatory spices such as turmeric and ginger. Both are similar to the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, crusty breads, whole grains, and olive oil as well as more fish and legumes and less meat and poultry than the typical Western diet contains. Whether you’re trying to lower blood pressure or simply eat well, you can’t go wrong with the DASH diet, or with the alternatives mentioned above.
Although guidelines include 2 cups of dairy (like milk and cheese) per day, this isn’t enough. “You absolutely need a calcium supplement, 500 milligrams with vitamin D, in the morning and in the evening. I also don’t like the idea that there’s no fruit and no starch during phase 1,” says Schmidt, though this is less of a problem if you’re only on it for the two weeks.
There are no days off. The plan actually requires you to restrict your food intake all the time. The site says that you have three days "on" and 4 days "off", but on your off days you are limited to 1,500 calories. Healthy food recommendations are provided for your off days. But anyone who can eat healthy portion-controlled meals doesn't need a special hot dog and ice cream program for weight loss. They should just stick to the nutritious diet they're already on.
Heller says offering practical advice can make following the DASH plan easier and longer lasting. The DASH dietary pattern isn't for the short term, she says; it's for life. "If a plan can't be sustained," she says, "why go to the trouble of trying to follow it in the first place?" She offers the following suggestions to help clients and patients follow the DASH diet:
Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic condition in which a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. Over 29.1 million children and adults in the US have diabetes. Of that, 8.1 million people have diabetes and don't even know it. Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent, juvenile) is caused by a problem with insulin production by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) is caused by:
Although guidelines include 2 cups of dairy (like milk and cheese) per day, this isn’t enough. “You absolutely need a calcium supplement, 500 milligrams with vitamin D, in the morning and in the evening. I also don’t like the idea that there’s no fruit and no starch during phase 1,” says Schmidt, though this is less of a problem if you’re only on it for the two weeks.
Just started my 2nd month of South Beach diet and have to say I think the food is actually pretty good. I have lost almost 8 pounds so far, so really happy with the results too. At this rate will probably keep getting the meals another month or two, but like where I am currently heading. Like Karen said don’t expect 5-star cuisine and you should be OK as long as you keep your expectations in check. The food isn’t the best thing I have ever had, but I wasn’t expecting it to be either since it’s microwavable diet food. That said, it tastes good enough and I’m losing weight, which is why I signed up in the first place!
In February 2017, advertising for the show sparked criticism in Germany, where Netflix promoted the show with posters depicting a human finger sliced up like a currywurst, a popular German fast food dish. After receiving more than 50 complaints that the advertising was glorifying violence and inducing fear, especially in children, the German Advertising Council, a self-regulatory institution, forwarded the complaints to the company. Netflix then decided to end the campaign and remove all posters.[14]
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