If you’ve been looking for a new diet to try — or just scrolling through healthy recipes on Pinterest — you’ve probably come across the “Military Diet." It’s a new fad diet that promises to help you lose 10 pounds in about a week, even more if you’re lucky, and was supposedly named after a technique the military uses to help recruits shed pounds. But what’s the real deal on this diet? Does it work as well as its proponents claim — and can you really eat ice cream every day that you're on it? We took a closer look at the meal plan. Check it out.


The South Beach diet consists of three phases. For the first two weeks, you are not allowed to eat bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, baked goods, fruit, sugar or consume alcohol. At the next level carbohydrates are added slowly, but it is still important that weight loss continues. In the third phase, when the goal regarding body weight has been reached, carbohydrates are added at the individuals choice.
The DASH diet and the control diet at the lower salt levels were both successful in lowering blood pressure, but the largest reductions in blood pressure were obtained by eating a combination of these two (i.e., a lower-salt version of the DASH diet). The effect of this combination at a sodium level of 1,500 mg/day was an average blood pressure reduction of 8.9/4.5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic). The hypertensive subjects experienced an average reduction of 11.5/5.7 mm Hg.[10] The DASH-sodium results indicate that low sodium levels correlated with the largest reductions in blood pressure for participants at both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive levels, with the hypertensive participants showing the greatest reductions in blood pressure overall.
Numerous studies show wide-ranging health benefits of the DASH diet. A consistent body of research has found that DASH lowers blood pressure in people with high blood pressure but also normal blood pressure even without lowering sodium intake. [4] It can produce greater reductions in blood pressure if sodium is restricted to less than 2300 mg a day, and even more so with a 1500 mg sodium restriction. [5, 6] When compared with a standard American diet (e.g., high intake of red and processed meats, beverages sweetened with sugar, sweets, refined grains) DASH has also been found to lower serum uric acid levels in people with hyperuricemia, which places them at risk for a painful inflammatory condition called gout. [7] Because people with gout often also have high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases, DASH is optimal in improving all of these conditions.
By the time you reach dinner on the 3 Day Military Diet, you’ll be relieved to see the feast you’re allowed to enjoy. The dinners are the heaviest meal of the day- offering the most calories- and also including more fruits and vegetables than the other meals. Ice cream is also featured in all three dinners: a much-needed treat while you’re dieting hard. This food often gets a bad rap for its poor nutritional content. Although it’s true that it contains an overdose of sugar, it also has plenty of calcium and vitamin B-12. The fat content is also important- since the rest of the diet is very low on fat.  Fats, contrary to what many people believe, actually play an important role in our bodies. They are a source of energy and also help your body to absorb essential vitamins and minerals. However, there are different kinds of fats. Some are healthy, while others aren’t. The fat in ice cream is saturated fat, and is considered an in-between fat, meaning it’s not particularly good or bad. When consumed in moderation, it won’t do you much harm. However, it’s preferable to consume polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats which are typically found in vegetables, nuts, fish and seeds. Now that you understand the role of the ice cream; let’s discuss the nutritional value of the rest of the foods in the dinners.
Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes.
Hi Holly – Thanks for the question. According to the South Beach Diet’s website all of their foods meet the sodium requirements from the American Heart Association. Here’s some info from their FAQs page: Question: “Are the South Beach Diet foods high in sodium? No. All the South Beach Diet® prepared foods meet the American Heart Association’s recommendation of 600mg or less of sodium in each meal, with many options coming in well under that amount. You can view sodium content and other nutrition information for each food item in the menu section.” Hope that helps!
For long-term success, it is recommended to avoid short fad diets and focus on a gradual lifestyle change. Start eliminating processed foods, and begin eating a mostly organic, plant-based whole food diet with plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seeds, nuts, beans, and legumes. Exercise at least 20 – 30 minutes a day. Get enough sleep, reduce stress, and practice a positive mindset.
This diet has introduced structure into my eating and has helped me better plan what I am having. Day 1 was rough due to the lack of caffeine even though we can have 2 cups of coffee that day but I didn’t feel hungry at all. In fact, throughout my 3 days I haven’t felt hungry at all. It was more of my craving for the fatty unhealthy food I was so use to eating before. I am on the last stretch of my 3rd day, still have my ice cream to eat. Before starting this diet I was extremely skeptical. I was worried that the amount of food or lack there of was going to leave me feeling hungry, weak and tired. I have tried other diets in the past and got results but not enough to keep my motivation. I’m not going to lie to you and say these past 3 days have been easy. It definitely took every ounce of will power and I’m looking forward to eating my 1500 calories tomorrow. I have been able to sleep better and I still have energy to take on my day as a full time working mom.
Again, Santa Clarita Diet acknowledges the trope; Eric Bemis (Skyler Gisondo) the Hammonds’ helpful, virginal neighbor, finds a girlfriend who turns out to be a zombie. He has sex, which in a horror story normally leads to some form of grotesque punishment. But while this show acknowledges that connecting with other people (zombies or otherwise) can initially seem terrifying, it suggests that intimacy doesn’t have to be a disaster. Sometimes, it turns out, zombies are just looking for sex. Or love. Or for someone to help them make sure their ears don’t fall off.

Joel and Sheila Hammond are realtors leading a normal suburban life with their daughter Abby. They are trying hard to sell a house but while showing it Sheila violently throws up extensively, including what might be an organ. Joel takes Sheila to the emergency department but since it is slow they go home. Sheila is acting oddly, including an increased libido; her blood is thick and she has no heartbeat. Their neighbor's son Eric explains to them that Sheila is dead and undead and driven by her Id, which Sheila is okay with. Eric tells them Sheila must always be fed, and if she degrades she may have to die. Sheila and Abby sneak out and buy a car, and later Sheila parties with her neighbors. Gary, Sheila's co-worker, entices Sheila to dance with him when Joel finds them. They leave and Sheila thinks her new behavior might be who she really is. At Sheila's home, Gary tries to force himself on her, threatening to tell others she was unfaithful if she refuses. Sheila licks his fingers, suddenly biting two of them off before devouring Gary in the backyard. Joel comes home to find Sheila eating Gary; as he looks on in horror, Sheila tells him she wants to make this work.
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