Heller says offering practical advice can make following the DASH plan easier and longer lasting. The DASH dietary pattern isn't for the short term, she says; it's for life. "If a plan can't be sustained," she says, "why go to the trouble of trying to follow it in the first place?" She offers the following suggestions to help clients and patients follow the DASH diet:
Whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, and oatmeal are good sources of fiber and nutrients; and have a low glycemic load making them good food choices. Processed food labels make it very confusing to understand whole grains. For example, "whole wheat bread" is made in many different ways, and some are not that different from white bread in its blood sugar impact (glycemic load). The same is true for whole grain pasta, it's still pasta. Whole grains have less of an impact on blood sugar because of the lower glycemic load. Choose whole grains that are still in their grain form like brown rice and quinoa, or look at the fiber content on the nutrition label. For example, a "good" whole grain bread will have 3+ grams of fiber per slice.
Fat isn’t the enemy, but you should be aware that some fats are more beneficial than others. I get most of my dietary fat from extra-virgin olive oil, avocados, nuts, and seeds. I totally avoid trans fats. Be careful when selecting dairy foods; sometimes “low-fat” and “nonfat” foods contain more sugar that their full-fat counterparts. Read the labels.
Barrymore returns as Sheila Hammond, an undead realtor with a hunger for human flesh, in Santa Clarita Diet season two alongside Timothy Olyphant as Joel Hammond. The new season picks up right where season one ended; Shelia is still an insatiable zombie (of sorts), occasionally giving in to her hunger for humans. The result? Barrymore gets covered in fake blood, guts and all sorts of things that look like they're straight out of a zombie apocalypse.
Phase one, aka “Body Reboot,” includes seven days’ worth of food: three meals and two snacks (a bar and shake). You'll eat lean protein (fish, shellfish, chicken, turkey and soy) and healthy fats, and add in your own fresh grocery vegetables and non-starchy vegetables. You won't touch fruit, fruit juice, starches (including pasta, rice and bread), whole grains, sugary foods or alcohol.

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, a strategy that has proved quite effective in lowering blood pressure. The diet involves consuming less salt and fat and more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products. It’s low in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol, and includes poultry, fish, and nuts, but includes much less red meat and fewer sweets and sugared beverages than most Americans are accustomed to consuming. Another version of the DASH diet limits sodium intake. By following the DASH diet, you should be able to pare 5.5 to 11.4 points off your systolic pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) and 3 to 5.5 points off your diastolic pressure (the bottom number in a blood pressure reading). Research also suggests that the diet reduces blood levels of homocysteine, a toxic amino acid that may increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.


The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[5] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice.[citation needed] It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[6]
"The issue with exercising during the diet is that you are cutting a large number of calories (your body's source of energy) out of your diet, which may make you feel less energetic and a little more sluggish than your typical self," said Mike Mullen, a performance expert and certified strength and conditioning coach from the New York Sports Science Lab.
The Diabetes Plate Method is another option that uses many of the ideas from the eating patterns described above and can be a great place to start for many people with diabetes.  This method uses a 9 inch plate.  The first step for many people is to use a smaller plate than they have been eating from.  Once you have a smaller plate, the idea is to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables, ¼ of your plate with protein foods and the last ¼ of your plate with carbohydrate foods. 
I really loved Timothy Olyphant's portrayal of the husband Joel. A guy who clearly loves his wife but just bursts out with the absurdity of his situation at times cracks me up. The kids were great and Drew Barrymore did a nice job of making a wacky character believable. Others have said they didn't understand the cookie cutter neighborhood with the neighbors who are one thing on the surface and something completely different deep down but I think that is part of the genius in this series. Loved it overall. Can't wait for season 2!
The DASH diet is consistently ranked the best diet for a reason. “It’s balanced, realistic and flexible. It’s an eating plan that includes common, everyday foods that offer a multitude of benefits for all age groups. I have no reservations about the DASH Diet,” Ward says. However, if you have a hard time digesting grains, legumes and/or dairy, try the diet and see, Zibdeh adds. In those instances, it may not be best for you.
As Agatston outlines in his book, the long-term effects of following the South Beach Diet — beyond just losing weight — include lowering your cholesterol, along with your risk of heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and even some cancers. Those are long-term effects that most diets don’t offer simply because they aren’t set up for you to stick with them indefinitely.
The DASH diet is a recognized treatment for hypertension, heart disease, and kidney disease. The DASH diet can slow the progression of both heart disease and kidney disease. If you already have chronic kidney disease, you should speak with your doctor and dietitian before starting any new diets as you may have special restrictions to consider. The DASH diet should not be used by people on dialysis. Individuals on dialysis have special dietary needs that should be discussed with a registered dietitian.

Perhaps the biggest benefit of this type of diet is the potential for weight loss, given that currently over 70 percent of the United States population is either overweight or obese, according to the NIDDK. The NIDDK reports that people who initially lost 15 to 25 percent of their body weight within six months might be able to maintain a 5 percent weight loss over a period of four years. (2) The catch here is that exercise and permanent lifestyle changes must be made for such effects to stick — and there’s no evidence the military diet leads to sustainable healthy habits that result in maintainable weight loss.
Hi Norman. I found your information very helpful. I received my SBD today and quickly put away the frozen foods and sat down to pack up the rest putting each day meals in a plastic bag with the meal plan, highlighting what items I would need to get out of the freezer. (trying to make getting out of the door in the AM easier. I was excited when packing week 1 but quickly got nervous with Phase 2. I was hoping I would receive an actual plan for the 2nd week to help be grasp their method. I am flustered already and haven’t started. I tried to find Phase 2 videos to help me select what to eat but the videos were very old. Do you have any suggestions for me or have you done a video for Phase 2? I was a little scared when I saw that there wasn’t a pre-planned menu. I’d appreciate any of your help.

Joel and Eric head to a paranormal convention to meet Anton, a popular and mysterious figure in the paranormal community, who claims to have an ancient book containing the cure for Sheila's condition. Anton accuses Joel of being a government agent, and when confronted later, admits he is a fraud and does not have the book; however, Joel is approached by another attendee, who puts him in touch with the book's real owner, Dr. Cora Wolf. Meanwhile, Sheila tries to bond with Abby, as the two try to get her money back from the brother of the deceased chop shop owner.
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