And some studies haven’t found any benefit of the South Beach Diet over other popular diet programs: For example, a review published in November 2014 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes looked at the effectiveness of the Atkins diet, the South Beach diet, the Zone diet, and the Weight Watchers diet, and researchers did not find evidence that any one plan was significantly more effective than the others. (7) (Of them all, at 12 months, the Weight Watchers diet appeared most effective at reducing weight.)
Who actually created this diet? I can’t find any data on its development, much less any studies on its effectiveness or healthfulness. All of this supports my initial gut instinct that this diet has zero backing in science and health. Also, this diet appears to masquerade under several different names, the Cardiac Diet being one. Search both Cardiac and Military diets, and you’ll find the exact same three-day menu and protocol, although the Cardiac Diet is suggested to be a diet that physicians prescribe to obese patients for quick weight loss.
DASH researchers studied three different diets on 459 people (27% of subjects had high blood pressure; the rest had normal). Keeping sodium levels constant (3,000 milligrams each day) they compared the traditional American diet (high in total fat, low in potassium, magnesium and calcium) to a diet high in fruits and vegetables (still not ideal in calcium or fat levels) and to a combination diet (the DASH diet - high in fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy foods and also low in total fat from animal products).
Hi Holly – Thanks for the question. According to the South Beach Diet’s website all of their foods meet the sodium requirements from the American Heart Association. Here’s some info from their FAQs page: Question: “Are the South Beach Diet foods high in sodium? No. All the South Beach Diet® prepared foods meet the American Heart Association’s recommendation of 600mg or less of sodium in each meal, with many options coming in well under that amount. You can view sodium content and other nutrition information for each food item in the menu section.” Hope that helps!
It's important to note that liquids are also restricted on the diet, and water and herbal teas are the only approved beverages, explains registered dietician Beth Warren. It's okay to drink coffee on the first day—but sugar, creamers, and artificial sweeteners are off limits, meaning you'll only be able to use stevia in your coffee (if needed). Alcohol, however, is definitely off limits, especially since wine and beer tend to contain a lot of calories, says Virgin.
Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco for the streaming service Netflix, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant.[1] Fresco serves as the showrunner, and is an executive producer alongside Drew Barrymore, Timothy Olyphant, Aaron Kaplan, Tracy Katsky, Chris Miller, Ember Truesdell and Ruben Fleischer.[2][3]
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