If you're not careful, you might mistake this for a regular cookbook rather than a diet one. My wife, who is not on a diet, has been enjoying these recipes as well. There's a wonderful variety in here. The recipes are simple and easy to fix. I like how each recipe is clearly marked to indicate the corresponding phase. Some miss the mark, but the majority are right on target. There's a heavy emphasis on flavor.
Cooking is probably the hardest part of the DASH diet. Otherwise, it’s pretty unrestrictive, you don’t need to buy anything special to follow it and everyone in the house can enjoy it. “It will likely help the whole family support good health, and since it’s based on whole, lightly or unprocessed foods, it’s more of a long-term eating style rather than a diet,” Ward says. That means you’re more likely to stick with it.
This diet was the biggest craze back in late 80s & 90's. I believe it was called "The Cleveland Clinic diet" & yes I remember having pickled beets w/ some of the dinners. I worked with a bunch of woman that were doing this diet & they claimed it was working for them. Being in my early 20s, my metabolism was so high & had a hard time gaining weight (of course everyone hated me) being 5'2- 115lbs, I decided to to give it a try to see if it did work. I did lose 4lbs. Now, 30 yrs later, 3 children & menopause has striken, & 50lbs heavier, I've decided it's time to try this again. I'm glad there are no beets in this one.That was the only thing I had a hard time with lol! I will post my results! Good luck everyone!
The main issue with every article I’ve read about this diet plan is they all follow the logic of, “it can lead to lack of certain nutrients,” which you’d easily replenish during the 4 days off. Then “it doesn’t work because you’ll just gain the weight right back,” assuming that when you stop the diet, you go right back to your usual lifestyle of overeating and not exercising, which is typically what made you overweight to begin with. The problem with that thought is that, if you “lose the weight” which should never be the focus, but the vfigure you desire. Ignore the number on the scale because BMI doesn’t account for muscle mass, bone structure, etc.

The single-camera series premiered on February 3, 2017.[4] The first season, consisting of 10 episodes, has received generally positive reviews, with critics praising the cast and premise, but criticizing the number of graphic scenes. On March 29, 2017, it was announced that Netflix renewed the series for a second season, which premiered on March 23, 2018.[5][6] On May 8, 2018, the series was renewed for a 10-episode third season set to premiere in 2019.[7]
×