Scroll through the #militarydietresults hashtag on Instagram and you can see plenty of people trying the meal plan out. Most report being down at least a couple of pounds and reducing their body fat percentage as well. And checking out their pictures, it's pretty crazy the progess they can make with just a few meals and a few days. Want to see what we mean? We asked Instagram users @healthyhappydays_ and @sweatherly816 to share their results with us. Check out their military diet results in the video below.

To follow the plan, one must decide their calorie level and then divide the suggested servings of each food group throughout the day. This requires meal planning ahead of time. The NHLBI guide provides many tips on how to incorporate DASH foods and to lower sodium intake; a one-day sample menu following a 2300 mg sodium restriction and a 1500 mg sodium restriction; and one week’s worth of recipes. The NHLBI also publishes an online database of “heart healthy” recipes.


Despite the overwhelming evidence that the DASH diet can reduce high blood pressure, and the growing number of studies suggesting that it can lower the risk of several other chronic diseases, few people adopt the DASH as their primary eating pattern. Data from the 1988–2004 NHANES found that only 20% of those surveyed met even one-half of the recommended levels of nutrients found in the DASH diet.9 An analysis of the data from 2007–2012 NHANES found that the average DASH score was 2.6 out of a possible nine. The score was based on nine nutrients: sodium, cholesterol, saturated fat, total fat, protein, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and fiber.10
Plan. Buy your food ahead of time so you aren't tempted by grocery shopping while hungry. Hunger destroys willpower. Buy enough food to last you through the whole diet so that you can avoid the temptation of shopping during the diet. Also, get rid of any junk food you have at home. Don’t just lock it in a closet, give it away and get it out of your house entirely. You don’t want anything to lead you astray while you’re on your diet and feeling very hungry. If you know there’s no junk food at home, you won’t tempt yourself as much. Dieting is hard. Don’t make it harder by knowing that junk food is close-by.

^ Jump up to: a b c Karanja, Njeri; Erlinger, TP; Pao-Hwa, Lin; Miller 3rd, Edgar R; Bray, George (September 2004). "The DASH Diet for High Blood Pressure: From Clinical Trial to Dinner Table". Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Lyndhurst, Ohio: The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. 71 (9): 745–53. doi:10.3949/ccjm.71.9.745. ISSN 0891-1150. PMID 15478706. Retrieved 2011-12-28.
To reach the goal of phase 2, the person should avoid all table salt and avoid adding any salt to cooking. We tend to get more than the recommended amount of sodium when we eat packaged or processed foods or when eating or dining out. Salt is the major source of sodium in the diet, and we can usually refer to the two words interchangeably unless we are discussing specific biochemical processes.
Tasmin recently returned home from university 12 pounds heavier! Her experience is typical of the returning college student who’s gained their “freshman fifteen.” She decided to give the 3 Day Military Diet a try to see if it would help her lose some of the extra weight. Follow her journey through this video. In the vlog, you’ll see how she’s feeling, how she did with the meals and of course – her results! Tasmin was upbeat throughout the diet, saying she powered through it even though it was a bit tough at times. As you’ll see, she exercised while on the diet and also spread out some of the foods, using some parts of meals as snacks. She did well on the diet and lost a total of 6 pounds!
The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan incorporated more fruits and vegetables, low fat or nonfat dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduced systolic blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called "pre-hypertension"). Those with hypertension dropped by 11 and 6 mm Hg, respectively. These changes in blood pressure occurred with no changes in body weight. The DASH dietary pattern is adjusted based on daily caloric intake ranging from 1,600 to 3,100 dietary calories.[2]
And some studies haven’t found any benefit of the South Beach Diet over other popular diet programs: For example, a review published in November 2014 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes looked at the effectiveness of the Atkins diet, the South Beach diet, the Zone diet, and the Weight Watchers diet, and researchers did not find evidence that any one plan was significantly more effective than the others. (7) (Of them all, at 12 months, the Weight Watchers diet appeared most effective at reducing weight.)
The diet food that Southbeach diet sends is horrible! I even had my husband taste it to make sure it was not just me. It is has very little taste. The breakfast meals are the worst. I tried their bacon, onion and pepper egg scramble and I couldn’t even force it down. It was absolutely horrible!!! I have had Jenni Craig food and at least I like their food. Southbeach frozen and shelf food, not so much. What a waste of money! I found out today that even if you are not satisfied with their product they will not refund you nor will they accept returns. I can’t see how this company will even make it when their food tastes so bad. I spent over $300 for food I can’t even force myself to eat. VERY BAD FOOD! What a waste of money!!!

The diet plan was initially developed for Agatston's own patients. Agatston noticed that the American Heart Association's then-recommended low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet was not lowering his patients' weight, cholesterol or blood sugar levels, but that his patients on the Atkins diet were experiencing weight loss. Unwilling to prescribe the Atkins approach to patients with cardiac issues due to the diet's allowance of saturated fat and limitation of carbohydrates containing fiber and other nutrients, Agatston referenced medical research to build an eating plan that categorized fats and carbohydrates as good or bad and emphasized lean protein and fiber.[17]

If you do decide to head for the South Beach, take Angelone's advice: Commit to the rules in Phase 1, including no alcohol. Keep a food record to see what you eat and when, so you can learn to change habits. Avoid overly processed foods. Think twice before buying into the diet's meal plan—the costs can add up. Stay well hydrated and keep up with exercise.


Meanwhile, saturated fats and trans fats can harm your heart and overall health, according to the American Heart Association. To spot trans fats, look for the term “hydrogenated” on labels of processed foods, such as packaged snacks, baked goods, and crackers. “I always tell my clients to double-check the ingredient list to make sure they don’t see any partially hydrogenated oil in their food products,” Massey says.
As a self-described “nutrition nerd,” I couldn’t help but analyze the first three days of menus provided using my nutrient analysis software. You’ll see the daily totals at the bottom of each day, and while I can’t describe the intake as “good”, “ideal” or “healthy,” the data was slightly better than I expected. (Or perhaps, I really wasn’t sure what to expect from this very odd combination of foods!)
MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you.

For most people with type 2 diabetes, the general guideline for moderate alcohol consumption applies. Research shows that one drink per day for women and two a day for men reduces cardiovascular risk and doesn't have a negative impact on diabetes. However, alcohol can lower blood sugar, and people with type 2 diabetes who are prone to hypoglycemia (such as those using insulin) should be aware of delayed hypoglycemia.

The primary outcome of the DASH-Sodium study was systolic blood pressure at the end of the 30-day dietary intervention periods. The secondary outcome was diastolic blood pressure. The DASH-Sodium study found that reductions in sodium intake produced significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both the control and DASH diets. Study results indicate that the quantity of dietary sodium in the control diet was twice as powerful in its effect on blood pressure as it was in the DASH diet. Importantly, the control diet sodium reductions from intermediate to low correlated with greater changes in systolic blood pressure than those same changes from high to intermediate (change equal to roughly 40 mmol per day, or 1 gram of sodium).[13]


Recommended by the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as a healthful dietary pattern,8 the DASH diet is an amalgam of every healthful eating recommendation that health and nutrition experts have been making for decades, eg, eat more fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy, nuts and seeds, beans, and whole grains, and lower intake of sodium and sugar.
The American Diabetes Association (ADA) advocates for a healthy diet with an emphasis on balancing energy intake with exercise. Historically, they have advocated for the majority of calories coming from complex carbohydrates from whole grains such as whole-grain bread and other whole-grain cereal products and a decreased intake of total fat with most of it coming from unsaturated fat.
Participants ate one of the three aforementioned dietary patterns in 3 separate phases of the trial, including (1) Screening, (2), Run-in and (3) Intervention. In the screening phase, participants were screened for eligibility based on the combined results of blood pressure readings. In the 3 week run-in phase, each subject was given the control diet for 3 weeks, had their blood pressure measurements taken on each of five separate days, gave one 24-hour urine sample and completed a questionnaire on symptoms. At this point, subjects who were compliant with the feeding program during the screening phase were each randomly assigned to one of the three diets outlined above, to begin at the start of the 4th week. The intervention phase followed next; this was an 8-week period in which the subjects were provided the diet to which they had been randomly assigned. Blood pressures and urine samples were collected again during this time together with symptom & physical activity recall questionnaires. The first group of study subjects began the run-in phase of the trial in September 1994 while the fifth and final group began in January 1996.[9] Each of the three diets contained the same 3 grams (3,000 mg) of sodium, selected because that was the approximate average intake in the nation at the time. Participants were also given two packets of salt, each containing 200 mg of sodium, for discretionary use. Alcohol was limited to no more than two beverages per day, and caffeine intake was limited to no more than three caffeinated beverages.[10]

The prevalence of hypertension led the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to propose funding to further research the role of dietary patterns on blood pressure. In 1992 the NHLBI worked with five of the most well-respected medical research centers in different cities across the U.S. to conduct the largest and most detailed research study to date. The DASH study used a rigorous design called a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and it involved teams of physicians, nurses, nutritionists, statisticians, and research coordinators working in a cooperative venture in which participants were selected and studied in each of these five research facilities. The chosen facilities and locales for this multi-center study were: (1) Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, (2) Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (3) Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon, (4) Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and (5) Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[2]

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH, diet has been consistently ranked by US News & World Report as a top diet for heart health and weight loss, and it’s no surprise why. Unlike fad diets that call for extreme calorie or food-group restrictions without scientific evidence that supports their efficacy, the DASH diet involves making manageable dietary changes that are flexible and rooted in proven nutritional advice.
All in all, I’d gained about 10 pounds. And while that's not a lot, it was very noticeable on my 5' 2" frame. I decided that once the holidays were over, I needed to do something drastic to shock myself out of my newfound unhealthy eating habits. I knew from going paleo that I tend to lose weight when I cut back on pasta and bread, so when I stumbled across the South Beach Diet, I was intrigued.
I would love to see a health professional’s list of substitutes for this diet! Is there by chance a vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free version? I understand the importance of following it strictly due to the scientific research behind the given foods, but I think it would be interesting to see a follow-up article or link to another publication that discusses what you can also use in the military diet.

Jump up ^ DeBruyne L, Pinna K, Whitney E (2011). "Chapter 7: Nutrition in practice — fad diets". Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Nutrition and Diet Therapy (8th ed.). Cengage Learning. p. 209. ISBN 1-133-71550-8. 'a fad diet by any other name would still be a fad diet.' And the names are legion: the Atkins Diet, the Cheater's Diet, the South Beach Diet, the Zone Diet. Year after year, 'new and improved' diets appear ...
No matter which type of diet you choose to follow, avoiding protein deficiency is important for a number of reasons, including controlling your appetite and preventing muscle loss. People who eat more protein usually report that they tend to feel satisfied for longer between meals and have better self-control when it comes to preventing snacking or overeating.
The diet claims to be “one of the best natural diets.” They recommend that dieters avoid artificial sweeteners because they “aren’t good for you.” But then the site goes on to include foods like hot dogs and crackers in the daily meal plans. These are foods that are heavily processed and contain ingredients that have been associated with an increased risk of cancer and heart disease.
For people living with diabetes who want to learn more about how to make healthy food choices that fit their lifestyle and taste, it can be tough to make out fact from fiction with so much conflicting information in the media. The American Diabetes Association reviews the latest research looking at what is safe and works well for people at risk or living with diabetes. Studies show there are many different eating patterns that can be helpful in managing diabetes. In the long run, the eating pattern that you can follow and sustain that meets your own diabetes goals will be the best option for you.  

Prepackaged South Beach Diet foods, such as shakes, snack bars and prepared breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals are available for consumers who sign up for the paid program. Many of these foods are similar to foods that you may feel uncomfortable giving up. But you'll eat them in smaller quantities if you buy the South Beach versions and the foods are prepared with fewer calories. 

The Hammonds—husband Joel (Timothy Olyphant), wife Sheila (Drew Barrymore), and daughter Abby (Liv Hewson)—are a typical middle-class family living in suburban Santa Clarita, with Joel and Sheila working as real-estate agents for the same firm. While showing a house to potential buyers, Sheila throws up a great deal of vomit and a strange red ball of flesh. This causes them to lose the house's listing to their co-worker, the sleazy Gary West (Nathan Fillion). After vomiting, however, Sheila begins to show changes to her personality, becoming bolder and more impulsive. She exhibits physical changes as well, such as the lack of a heartbeat, thickening blood, and a strong craving for raw meat. Their neighbor's son Eric (Skyler Gisondo) suggests that Sheila may have become a zombie, a fact the family soon confirms. The Hammonds now face the challenge of having to keep Sheila fed on human flesh without alerting the authorities, especially their cop neighbors.
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