The South Beach Diet was originally a diet plan outlined in a book by Arthur Agatston, MD. The doctor developed the plan in the 1990s to help his patients lose weight. The South Beach Diet: The Delicious, Doctor-Designed, Foolproof Plan for Fast and Healthy Weight Loss flew off shelves in 2003 when it was first published.  Since that time, the book has gone through several variations and changes, but the core of the eating plan has stayed the same.
On the South Beach Diet, you get to that point in three phases, the first of which involves a cutthroat elimination of all carbs for two weeks. White rice and baked goods were out, of course, but so were natural, healthy-for-you sources like fruits. The book says the process is meant to help a person rid herself of sugar cravings and also initiate “early rapid weight loss” to inspire the person to stick with it. The second phase includes the slow reintroduction of foods like whole grains until the person’s goal weight is reached, while the third phase is when the diet has become a lifestyle that helps her maintain that weight.
While anyone with diabetes can take up a gluten-free diet, it may add unnecessary restrictions for those without celiac disease. It’s also important to remember that gluten-free is not synonymous with low carb. There are plenty of processed, high-sugar, gluten-free foods. There is usually no need to complicate meal planning by eliminating gluten unless you need to.
Sure, you can take a multivitamin while you’re on the diet. That said, you should really only be taking a multivitamin if you struggle to eat a varied diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables. The multivitamin will ensure that you’re not missing out on any minerals and vitamins that you’re not getting from your diet. Make sure that supplements and vitamins are approved by your doctor before you take them.
DASH is based on the following foods: fruits, vegetables, low fat milk, whole grains, fish, poultry, beans, and nuts. It recommends reducing sodium, foods and beverages with added sugars, and red meat. The diet is heart-friendly as it limits saturated and trans fat, while increasing the intake of potassium, magnesium, calcium, protein, and fiber, nutrients believed to help control blood pressure. [1]
Like other fad diets, the South Beach Diet has been marketed with bold claims that are not supported by evidence and with an unrealistic promise of easy weight loss.[6] The book which promotes it also contains some incorrect and misleading information.[1][4] Nevertheless, some aspects of the diet correspond with dietary advice which is recognized as sensible:[6] its last two stages are sufficiently nutritious to be considered healthy.[8] Like other high-fat diets, its short-term safety has been established, but its long-term safety has not.[9]
To reach the goal of phase 2, the person should avoid all table salt and avoid adding any salt to cooking. We tend to get more than the recommended amount of sodium when we eat packaged or processed foods or when eating or dining out. Salt is the major source of sodium in the diet, and we can usually refer to the two words interchangeably unless we are discussing specific biochemical processes.

The DASH diet was further tested and developed in the Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial for Heart Health (OmniHeart diet).[3] "The DASH and DASH-sodium trials demonstrated that a carbohydrate-rich diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and that is reduced in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol substantially lowered blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. OmniHeart demonstrated that partial replacement of carbohydrate with either protein (about half from plant sources) or with unsaturated fat (mostly monounsaturated fat) can further reduce blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and coronary heart disease risk."[4]
I would love to see a health professional’s list of substitutes for this diet! Is there by chance a vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free version? I understand the importance of following it strictly due to the scientific research behind the given foods, but I think it would be interesting to see a follow-up article or link to another publication that discusses what you can also use in the military diet.

Chia is a type of seed that provides fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. Chia is a superfood because it brings down the glycemic load of any meal, increases hunger satisfaction (satiety), and stabilizes bloods sugar. Adding chia to your breakfast will help keep you full longer. They primary type of fiber in chia is soluble fiber. Soluble fibers turn to a gel when mixed with water. This makes chia seeds excellent to use in baking and cooking when a thickener is needed. Chia mixed with almond milk, cocoa, and a low-glycemic index sweetener like agave or stevia makes an excellent healthy pudding!
The Military Diet is a strict, short-term plan that requires drastically reducing your caloric intake. The restrictions work over a three-day period, and then you take four days off from the diet. Some users participate in the Military Diet on an occasional basis, while others might do three days on and four days off for a month at a time. In fact, the Military Diet website touts that people who follow the plan for 30 days could “lose up to 30 lbs,” though registered dietitians strongly advise against doing so. (More on that later.)
While season one was a bit of a mess, it was still enjoyable. In season two, the show's found its footing and adds some hilarious and surprising twists to the narrative and characters. Barrymore and Olyphant's chemistry drives the show at this point, but the lore behind Sheila's condition, and the social satire at the show's heart, come together in a way that feels more natural than season one.
For people with diabetes, healthy eating is not simply a matter of "what one eats", but also when one eats. The question of how long before a meal one should inject insulin is asked in Sons Ken, Fox and Judd (1998). It depends upon the type one takes and whether it is long-, medium- or quick-acting insulin. If patients check their blood glucose at bedtime and find that it is low, for example below 6 millimoles per liter (108 mg/dL), it is advisable that they take some long-acting carbohydrate before retiring to bed to prevent night-time hypoglycemia. Night sweats, headaches, restless sleep, and nightmares can be a sign of nocturnal hypoglycemia, and patients should consult their doctor for adjustments to their insulin routine if they find that this is the case.[38] Counterintuitively, another possible sign of nocturnal hypoglycemia is morning hyperglycemia, which actually occurs in response to blood sugar getting too low at night. This is called the Somogyi effect.
The Military Diet is a strict, short-term plan that requires drastically reducing your caloric intake. The restrictions work over a three-day period, and then you take four days off from the diet. Some users participate in the Military Diet on an occasional basis, while others might do three days on and four days off for a month at a time. In fact, the Military Diet website touts that people who follow the plan for 30 days could “lose up to 30 lbs,” though registered dietitians strongly advise against doing so. (More on that later.)
I’ve heard of the military diet and have contemplated it, but haven’t tried it as of yet. As I get light-headed very easily, this may NOT be the diet for me to try at all. I know a couple of people who have done it and benefited from it, but they said it was hard in the beginning. For me, the cons outweigh the pros. I just can’t risk any health issues arising from it.
“This plan is presented very simply, no measuring for many of the foods is necessary, especially at the beginning,” says Kraus. “Due to the strictness of phase 1, some people could have a significant amount of weight loss in the first two weeks, [such as] 8 to 12 pounds. Phase 1 could help stop cravings for highly refined carbs, and the foods recommended throughout the plan are heart healthy.” Blood sugar control has the added bonus of helping control type 2 diabetes if you already have it.
You can choose from many types of stretching exercises. Yoga is a type of stretching that focuses on your breathing and helps you relax. Even if you have problems moving or balancing, certain types of yoga can help. For instance, chair yoga has stretches you can do when sitting in a chair or holding onto a chair while standing. Your health care team can suggest whether yoga is right for you.
DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium.
Hi Alma – Honestly, I think both programs work great, so you probably can’t go wrong with either. The big difference is the coaching that comes with OPTAVIA, so if you feel that you could benefit from working with a coach 1-on-1, that may be the one to go with. If you want to save a few bucks, and think you can have success without the coach, then South Beach Diet may be the better choice.

Each year, US News & World Report ranks the best diets based on expert advice in areas such as ease of compliance, weight loss results, and effectiveness against CVD and diabetes. The DASH diet has come in at number one for seven years in a row. So why isn't DASH the dietary darling, with thousands of consumers clamoring to get the latest information as they do for the likes of Paleo, Atkins, the Alkaline Diet, or Whole30?
Sheila begins chasing animals to curb her antsy behavior. Joel and Sheila run into their neighbor Lisa, who has no news on her "missing" husband Dan and has since started seeing his partner, Deputy Anne Garcia. Abby and Eric realize that their emails to Goran could trace his disappearance back to them. Sheila and Joel convince their boss Carl to give them one of Gary's old assignments. Abby and Eric break into Goran's apartment to delete the evidence. Abby tells Eric how scared she was when Goran followed her home, but Eric's phone keeps blowing up with texts from Ramona. Another couple enters the apartment, also claiming to be Goran's friends. Abby and Eric leave, but the other couple knows about the bile. Sheila and Joel compete with their high school rivals, Chris and Christa, for a listing and prevail when Sheila is able to run down the owner's fleeing dog. Abby reluctantly encourages Eric to ask Ramona out. Sheila and Joel discover that the spot where they buried her first kill, Gary, is planned for development. They go to the desert to dig him up, but discover that Gary's severed head has reanimated.
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