The diet claims to be “one of the best natural diets.” They recommend that dieters avoid artificial sweeteners because they “aren’t good for you.” But then the site goes on to include foods like hot dogs and crackers in the daily meal plans. These are foods that are heavily processed and contain ingredients that have been associated with an increased risk of cancer and heart disease.
The primary outcome of the DASH-Sodium study was systolic blood pressure at the end of the 30-day dietary intervention periods. The secondary outcome was diastolic blood pressure. The DASH-Sodium study found that reductions in sodium intake produced significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures in both the control and DASH diets. Study results indicate that the quantity of dietary sodium in the control diet was twice as powerful in its effect on blood pressure as it was in the DASH diet. Importantly, the control diet sodium reductions from intermediate to low correlated with greater changes in systolic blood pressure than those same changes from high to intermediate (change equal to roughly 40 mmol per day, or 1 gram of sodium).[13]
She's not confident about long-term results, either. "I’d wager that most people won’t keep the weight off, because the Military Diet doesn’t offer enough guidance on how to expand beyond its prescribed foods. Plus, the diet doesn’t offer guidance on how to deal with all the other facets of weight loss, such as emotional eating, dealing with temptations, restaurant eating, relapse, etc... There are better weight loss plans out there that are more nutritionally balanced, and address the multi-faceted nature of weight loss which includes exercise, emotions, support, etc." If you're looking for one, Jibrin recommends the DASH diet, a Mediterranean-style diet, or Weight Watchers. "Ideally, join a program that helps you with the other facets of weight loss, such as exercise, emotional eating, and support."
^ Jump up to: a b c Karanja, Njeri; Erlinger, TP; Pao-Hwa, Lin; Miller 3rd, Edgar R; Bray, George (September 2004). "The DASH Diet for High Blood Pressure: From Clinical Trial to Dinner Table". Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Lyndhurst, Ohio: The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. 71 (9): 745–53. doi:10.3949/ccjm.71.9.745. ISSN 0891-1150. PMID 15478706. Retrieved 2011-12-28.
The single-camera series premiered on February 3, 2017.[4] The first season, consisting of 10 episodes, has received generally positive reviews, with critics praising the cast and premise, but criticizing the number of graphic scenes. On March 29, 2017, it was announced that Netflix renewed the series for a second season, which premiered on March 23, 2018.[5][6] On May 8, 2018, the series was renewed for a 10-episode third season set to premiere in 2019.[7]
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