Hi Holly – Thanks for the question. According to the South Beach Diet’s website all of their foods meet the sodium requirements from the American Heart Association. Here’s some info from their FAQs page: Question: “Are the South Beach Diet foods high in sodium? No. All the South Beach Diet® prepared foods meet the American Heart Association’s recommendation of 600mg or less of sodium in each meal, with many options coming in well under that amount. You can view sodium content and other nutrition information for each food item in the menu section.” Hope that helps!
DASH was first introduced at a meeting of the American Heart Association in 1996 and later published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997. [2] The DASH trial randomly assigned 456 people to different diets to test the effects of dietary patterns on lowering blood pressure. The authors surmised that eating a diet with many different foods with blood pressure-lowering nutrients would show a greater effect on blood pressure than eating single nutrients, such as found in supplements or in a limited diet. Three diets were tested: 1) a control diet, or a standard American diet, 2) a fruits and vegetables diet, similar to the control diet but providing more fruits and vegetables and less snacks and sweets, and 3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, and low-fat dairy foods with reduced amounts of saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol. The last two diets were richer in nutrients associated with lower blood pressure, such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, fiber, and protein. All three diets provided about 3000 mg sodium, which is more than the recommended amount from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans but less than the average sodium intake for Americans. [3]
The patient later admitted to having been on the South Beach Diet at the time of presentation, having adhered to a particularly strict (less than 20 grams carbohydrate daily) form of this low carbohydrate diet plan. The patient stated that he had eliminated virtually all forms of carbohydrate from his diet for the three weeks prior to his presentation and had lost 16 pounds (7.3 kg) over the same time period. Following discharge, the patient discontinued the low carbohydrate diet plan and he has remained asymptomatic and euglycemic over the following two years while maintaining a BMI of 27.
DASH was first introduced at a meeting of the American Heart Association in 1996 and later published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997. [2] The DASH trial randomly assigned 456 people to different diets to test the effects of dietary patterns on lowering blood pressure. The authors surmised that eating a diet with many different foods with blood pressure-lowering nutrients would show a greater effect on blood pressure than eating single nutrients, such as found in supplements or in a limited diet. Three diets were tested: 1) a control diet, or a standard American diet, 2) a fruits and vegetables diet, similar to the control diet but providing more fruits and vegetables and less snacks and sweets, and 3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, and low-fat dairy foods with reduced amounts of saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol. The last two diets were richer in nutrients associated with lower blood pressure, such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, fiber, and protein. All three diets provided about 3000 mg sodium, which is more than the recommended amount from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans but less than the average sodium intake for Americans. [3]

If IMF seems too difficult for you, you might consider trying calorie/carb-cycling diets. Carb cycling is a type of diet plan that involves eating more carbohydrates (and sometimes calories in general) only on certain days of the week, but doing the opposite on the other days. Carb cycling increases your intake of carbohydrates only at the right time and in the right amounts, supporting your metabolism and providing you with energy without leading to excess carb/calorie intake that’s stored as fat. On lower-carb days, foods that are filling and have enough protein are the base of your meals, such as non-starchy veggies, grass-fed meats, eggs and healthy fats like avocado.
Eric helps Sheila reattach her finger and lets it slip about the tray incident. Sheila and Joel confront Abby, but she feels no remorse. Eric goes undercover at Japopo's but the owner won’t disclose his clam distributor. Out of concern, Sheila and Joel force Abby to apologize to Christian only to discover that his parents are Chris and Christa, who try to blackmail the Hammonds with threats of Abby's expulsion. Eric breaks into Japopo's back office. The Hammonds go to Principal Novak's house where Sheila and Joel tell Abby how difficult it’s been juggling all their problems and ask Abby to help them out. Abby apologizes to Novak but gets expelled anyway. He accidentally slams Sheila's finger in his door and she pretends to be hurt, forcing Novak to un-expel Abby. Eric calls Joel to show him that Japopo's used a different clam distributor, Ruby's Clams, the day that the Hammonds ate there before Sheila's transformation. Sheila pulls into the parking lot for an investor meeting but Carl shows up unexpectedly. She closes her eyes and wakes up 12 hours later at home with blood on her face and a heart in her hand.
Oven fried chicken: Toss 4 oz raw chicken breast in 1 Tbsp reduced-fat Italian dressing, coat with 2 Tbsp seasoned bread crumb and spray lightly with canola oil. Place on lightly oiled cookie sheet. Bake at 350ºF for 30 minutes or until browned and no longer pink inside. Serve with 3-bean salad (toss ½ c green beans, ¼  c garbanzo beans, ¼  c red beans, 2 Tbsp chopped onion and 2 Tbsp reduced-fat Italian dressing)
The best way to avoid these foods is to shop around the edges of the grocery store and minimize the number of processed, packaged foods in the middle. Sticking with "real" food in its whole, minimally processed form is the best way to eat well for diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes who eat a healthy diet pattern like the ones discussed here reduce the risk of complications that stem from high blood sugar, like cardiovascular disease and obesity.
The first stage lasts for two weeks and is expected to reduce your desire for sugar and artificial starch and trigger weight loss.  The goal is to reduce fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Emphasis is placed on the consumption of fiber rich, nutrient-dense food. You may eat meat, fish, chicken, vegetable fiber, lean cheese, eggs, fat-free dairy products, healthy, unsaturated fatty acids that can, for example, be found in avocado, nuts, and seeds. Use oil for cooking, for example, olive oil, which contains high levels polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Hi Alma – Honestly, I think both programs work great, so you probably can’t go wrong with either. The big difference is the coaching that comes with OPTAVIA, so if you feel that you could benefit from working with a coach 1-on-1, that may be the one to go with. If you want to save a few bucks, and think you can have success without the coach, then South Beach Diet may be the better choice.
Fat isn’t the enemy, but you should be aware that some fats are more beneficial than others. I get most of my dietary fat from extra-virgin olive oil, avocados, nuts, and seeds. I totally avoid trans fats. Be careful when selecting dairy foods; sometimes “low-fat” and “nonfat” foods contain more sugar that their full-fat counterparts. Read the labels.
Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results.
Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt.
Hemoglobin A1c or HbA1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells. The HbA1c test is used to monitor blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes over time. Normal HbA1c levels are 6% or less. HbA1c levels can be affected by insulin use, fasting, glucose intake (oral or IV), or a combination of these and other factors. High hemoglobin A1c levels in the blood increases the risk of microvascular complications, for example, diabetic neuropathy, eye, and kidney disease.
Numerous studies show wide-ranging health benefits of the DASH diet. A consistent body of research has found that DASH lowers blood pressure in people with high blood pressure but also normal blood pressure even without lowering sodium intake. [4] It can produce greater reductions in blood pressure if sodium is restricted to less than 2300 mg a day, and even more so with a 1500 mg sodium restriction. [5, 6] When compared with a standard American diet (e.g., high intake of red and processed meats, beverages sweetened with sugar, sweets, refined grains) DASH has also been found to lower serum uric acid levels in people with hyperuricemia, which places them at risk for a painful inflammatory condition called gout. [7] Because people with gout often also have high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases, DASH is optimal in improving all of these conditions.
The DASH diet and the control diet at the lower salt levels were both successful in lowering blood pressure, but the largest reductions in blood pressure were obtained by eating a combination of these two (i.e., a lower-salt version of the DASH diet). The effect of this combination at a sodium level of 1,500 mg/day was an average blood pressure reduction of 8.9/4.5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic). The hypertensive subjects experienced an average reduction of 11.5/5.7 mm Hg.[10] The DASH-sodium results indicate that low sodium levels correlated with the largest reductions in blood pressure for participants at both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive levels, with the hypertensive participants showing the greatest reductions in blood pressure overall.
DASH is based on the following foods: fruits, vegetables, low fat milk, whole grains, fish, poultry, beans, and nuts. It recommends reducing sodium, foods and beverages with added sugars, and red meat. The diet is heart-friendly as it limits saturated and trans fat, while increasing the intake of potassium, magnesium, calcium, protein, and fiber, nutrients believed to help control blood pressure. [1]
From the whole wheat toast, you’ll get plenty of carbohydrates, fiber, iron, Vitamin B-6, magnesium and calcium. You’re probably familiar with most of these vitamins and minerals. Calcium of course is important for healthy bones and teeth. Magnesium is also found in the bones; but is needed too for creating protein. Iron plays an important role in blood, specifically, it carries oxygen in the body (2). That’s why iron deficiencies can cause you to feel tired, as oxygen may move more slowly throughout your body. The peanut butter will fill you up with 8 grams of protein and healthy fats. Finally, both coffee and tea are full of antioxidants and caffeine to give you a kick start in energy. As a result, you can confidently choose either coffee or tea. If you want to obtain additional health benefits, try drinking green tea.
The prevalence of hypertension led the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to propose funding to further research the role of dietary patterns on blood pressure. In 1992 the NHLBI worked with five of the most well-respected medical research centers in different cities across the U.S. to conduct the largest and most detailed research study to date. The DASH study used a rigorous design called a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and it involved teams of physicians, nurses, nutritionists, statisticians, and research coordinators working in a cooperative venture in which participants were selected and studied in each of these five research facilities. The chosen facilities and locales for this multi-center study were: (1) Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, (2) Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (3) Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon, (4) Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and (5) Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[2]
While anyone with diabetes can take up a gluten-free diet, it may add unnecessary restrictions for those without celiac disease. It’s also important to remember that gluten-free is not synonymous with low carb. There are plenty of processed, high-sugar, gluten-free foods. There is usually no need to complicate meal planning by eliminating gluten unless you need to.

DASH was first introduced at a meeting of the American Heart Association in 1996 and later published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1997. [2] The DASH trial randomly assigned 456 people to different diets to test the effects of dietary patterns on lowering blood pressure. The authors surmised that eating a diet with many different foods with blood pressure-lowering nutrients would show a greater effect on blood pressure than eating single nutrients, such as found in supplements or in a limited diet. Three diets were tested: 1) a control diet, or a standard American diet, 2) a fruits and vegetables diet, similar to the control diet but providing more fruits and vegetables and less snacks and sweets, and 3) a combination diet rich in fruits, vegetables, nuts, and low-fat dairy foods with reduced amounts of saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol. The last two diets were richer in nutrients associated with lower blood pressure, such as potassium, magnesium, calcium, fiber, and protein. All three diets provided about 3000 mg sodium, which is more than the recommended amount from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans but less than the average sodium intake for Americans. [3]
Cooking is probably the hardest part of the DASH diet. Otherwise, it’s pretty unrestrictive, you don’t need to buy anything special to follow it and everyone in the house can enjoy it. “It will likely help the whole family support good health, and since it’s based on whole, lightly or unprocessed foods, it’s more of a long-term eating style rather than a diet,” Ward says. That means you’re more likely to stick with it.

I’ve been on South Beach since July 28 and have lost 12 lbs. i don’t mind the food in fact I think it is better than Nutrisystem as there are lots of frozen foods. One of my problems is stomach issues and bad headaches. I feel like I have a hangover and those days are long gone! I have chewing tums all day. Perhaps I really need the bad food! LOL! My sugar has been great! My one really bad problem is the customer service! They are the very worst! They talk over you and I got into a screaming match with the hitch I was talking to. They obviously have never heard that the customer is always right. I think that they think they are always talking to someone who wants to cancel! Very rude. I just ordered my second auto ship and probably will cancel after I get it so I don’t have to deal with their consultants and cancellation policy! They seriously need training in dealing with their customers!!
The South Beach Diet was created by a cardiologist in 2003, and it's considered to be a modified low-carbohydrate diet, according to U.S. News & World Report. It's based on the idea that carbs and fats can be either good or bad. If you decide to follow the South Beach Diet, you'll probably be getting fewer carbs and more protein and healthy fats than you're used to eating.
The Diabetes Plate Method is another option that uses many of the ideas from the eating patterns described above and can be a great place to start for many people with diabetes.  This method uses a 9 inch plate.  The first step for many people is to use a smaller plate than they have been eating from.  Once you have a smaller plate, the idea is to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables, ¼ of your plate with protein foods and the last ¼ of your plate with carbohydrate foods. 
“Most people don’t eat enough whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes, foods rich in the nutrients that you need to support health on the DASH diet,” Ward says. These foods provide fiber, potassium and magnesium, which help control or prevent high blood pressure and also have other health benefits such as regulating blood and nerve functioning and supporting digestive health. The foods also provide a variety of other nutrients.
The NY Times Best Sellers, The DASH Diet Action Plan and The DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution, provide real life solutions to make it easy for people to follow the DASH diet. They each have 28 days of meal plans, recipes, guidance for weight loss, how to eat at restaurants, fast food places, etc. and still stay on track. It shows you how to stock up your kitchen for the DASH diet, and how to read food labels to make good choices. And, of course, the meal plans and recipes are all low sodium/low salt. The books show you how to add exercise and other lifestyle changes to help lower blood pressure. The books help you design your own personal "DASH Diet Action Plan" and your own "DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution."
A military gentleman who attended our church some years back introduced me to this diet. He said that military recruits use this diet when they need to get in shape quickly. Since then I’ve done extensive research and heard from countless people who have tried this plan. Combined with my own personal trial and error, the diet that follows is carefully tested and includes advice to help you succeed. Feel confident and see the results for yourself!

Sheila can’t recall anything since the parking lot and is missing a boot. She and Joel suspect she killed Carl until Carl shows up to work and fires Sheila for missing the meeting. Lisa stops by the Hammonds' house to thank Sheila for convincing her to get baptized for Anne. During her blackout, Sheila also convinced Anne to focus on painting rather than the murder investigations. Abby finds AJ, the Nazi who sold Sheila the raffle book, dead in their freezer. Sheila and Joel go to AJ's work to retrieve her missing boot. Abby and Eric make plans to vandalize a fracking site. Abby asks Lisa for Dan's night vision goggles and Lisa agrees to lend them to her if Abby agrees to a makeover before her "date" with Eric. Sheila and Joel delete the security videos and retrieve Sheila's boot. Abby tells Eric she wants to use Dan's explosives, but Eric backs out of the plan. Joel quits his job and he and Sheila decide to establish their own real estate company. Anne's "Suspicious Objects" series includes paintings of Gary's finger, the Nazi raffle book, Dan's missing persons poster, and Joel.
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