The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan incorporated more fruits and vegetables, low fat or nonfat dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduced systolic blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called "pre-hypertension"). Those with hypertension dropped by 11 and 6 mm Hg, respectively. These changes in blood pressure occurred with no changes in body weight. The DASH dietary pattern is adjusted based on daily caloric intake ranging from 1,600 to 3,100 dietary calories.[2]


According to its website, the Military Diet works due to its combination of putting the body into a starvation state while consuming fat-burning foods. In fact, the site suggests that the extremely low level of calories is a form of fasting. Research on forms of intermittent fasting has suggested some potential health benefits, but the Military Diet doesn’t follow the same protocol that most research studies have used (going 16 hours without eating or alternating extremely low and moderate calories days, as well as emphasizing nutrient-dense choices when food is consumed).
According to the website, the Military Diet requires you eat specific foods for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the course of three days. The meal plan is extremely calorie-restrictive: on the first day, for instance, you can only eat roughly 1078 calories. (For comparison, the average, moderately active male needs roughly 2400 to 2600 calories per day.)
Losing a large amount of weight rapidly could indicate that you're losing water weight or lean tissue, rather than fat. In some situations, however, faster weight loss can be safe if it's done in a healthy way. For example, some diets include an initiation phase to help you jump-start your weight loss, including the South Beach Diet and the Mayo Clinic Diet.
Generally speaking, it also depends on your size. If you are overly obese, by simply cutting down on junk food and moving your body a bit, you may drop 10 pounds in less than a week easily without causing a health problem. However, for someone who is only slightly overweight or within the normal range wanting to slim down a bit, this is not healthy or sustainable. You may lose weight; but the pounds will creep up again when you stop the diet.
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Hi Norman. I found your information very helpful. I received my SBD today and quickly put away the frozen foods and sat down to pack up the rest putting each day meals in a plastic bag with the meal plan, highlighting what items I would need to get out of the freezer. (trying to make getting out of the door in the AM easier. I was excited when packing week 1 but quickly got nervous with Phase 2. I was hoping I would receive an actual plan for the 2nd week to help be grasp their method. I am flustered already and haven’t started. I tried to find Phase 2 videos to help me select what to eat but the videos were very old. Do you have any suggestions for me or have you done a video for Phase 2? I was a little scared when I saw that there wasn’t a pre-planned menu. I’d appreciate any of your help.
Instead of having processed wheat toast, try having a small portion of whole grains (such as gluten-free oats, quinoa or brown rice) or better yet a totally unprocessed source of carbohydrates like a baked sweet potato. Another option is to skip the grains and starchy veggies altogether, substituting them for 1/4 cup of plain yogurt with a teaspoon of flaxseeds.
As a self-described “nutrition nerd,” I couldn’t help but analyze the first three days of menus provided using my nutrient analysis software. You’ll see the daily totals at the bottom of each day, and while I can’t describe the intake as “good”, “ideal” or “healthy,” the data was slightly better than I expected. (Or perhaps, I really wasn’t sure what to expect from this very odd combination of foods!)

According to the Mayo Clinic, the DASH diet calls for eating lots of fresh veggies and fruits, but it requires consuming only a moderate amount of whole grains, as well as lean sources of protein and healthy fats, such as fish and nuts, respectively. (6) This distinguishes the DASH Diet from other popular plans, such as the Atkins diet and the ketogenic diet, or the high-fat, low-carb diet.
The purpose-created Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is designed to help you lower your blood pressure naturally, as part of an overall plan to reduce your risk of deadly heart disease. Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the developed world, and unlike the second leading cause—cancer—there are concrete steps one can take to dramatically reduce the risk of falling victim to this killer.
Still, the biggest political message of Santa Clarita Diet is the same in season 2 as in season 1: “Everyone deserves love, even zombies.” Sheila has, as Joel notes several times, a “medical condition”; she’s disabled and different in ways that are sometimes frightening and disgusting on the surface. Standard zombie narratives say she needs to be forced out of her job, tied in the basement, walled up, and / or shot in the head, with a swift and unceremonious corpse-burning to follow. When the zombies come, films and shows like The Walking Dead suggest that the only means to survival is embracing harsh masculine values: be tough, be ruthless, trust no one, carry lots of guns.
The DASH-Sodium study was conducted following the end of the original DASH study to determine whether the DASH diet could produce even better results if it were low in salt and also to examine the effects of different levels of sodium in people eating the DASH diet.[2] The researchers were interested in determining the effects of sodium reduction when combined with the DASH diet as well as the effects of the DASH diet when at three levels of sodium intake. The DASH-Sodium trial was conducted from September 1997 through November 1999. Like the previous study, it was based on a large sample (412 participants) and was a multi-center, randomized, outpatient feeding study where the subjects were given all their food.[12] The participants were adults with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension (average systolic of 120 to 159 mm Hg & average diastolic of 80 to 95 mm Hg) and were randomly assigned to one of two diet groups.[10] The two randomized diet groups were the DASH diet and a control diet that mirrored a “typical American diet”, and which was somewhat low in key nutrients such as potassium, magnesium and calcium. The DASH diet was the same as in the previous DASH study. After being assigned to one of these two diets, the participants were given diets that differed by 3 distinct levels of sodium content, corresponding to 3,000 mg, 2,400 mg or 1,500 mg/day (higher, intermediate or lower), in random order, for 30 consecutive days each.[10] During the two-week run-in phase, all participants ate the high sodium control diet. The 30-day intervention phase followed, in which subjects ate their assigned diets at each of the aforementioned sodium levels (high, intermediate and low) in random order, in a crossover design.[12] During the 30-day dietary intervention phase, each participant therefore consumed his or her assigned diet (either DASH or control) at all three sodium levels.[dubious – discuss]

If you're not careful, you might mistake this for a regular cookbook rather than a diet one. My wife, who is not on a diet, has been enjoying these recipes as well. There's a wonderful variety in here. The recipes are simple and easy to fix. I like how each recipe is clearly marked to indicate the corresponding phase. Some miss the mark, but the majority are right on target. There's a heavy emphasis on flavor.


The DASH diet was further tested and developed in the Optimal Macronutrient Intake Trial for Heart Health (OmniHeart diet).[3] "The DASH and DASH-sodium trials demonstrated that a carbohydrate-rich diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and that is reduced in saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol substantially lowered blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. OmniHeart demonstrated that partial replacement of carbohydrate with either protein (about half from plant sources) or with unsaturated fat (mostly monounsaturated fat) can further reduce blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and coronary heart disease risk."[4]

According to Mike Russell, MD: "If you weigh 180 pounds and your goal weight is 130 pounds, losing 20 pounds in one week—the right way—teeters on the brink of impossible. If you’re more like a Biggest Loser contestant, weighing 380 pounds, then losing 20 pounds in one week is plausible (especially considering a large amount of water weight you would lose during the first week)."
Sheila (Barrymore) and her on-screen hubby Joel (played by Justified star Timothy Olyphant) are faced with an entirely new challenge after Sheila’s undead diagnosis, one that involves a lot of gore—and a lot of trust in one another. Their unique circumstances lead to even stranger situations, including careful victim selection and cleaning up blood and guts with a hose.
Here’s the hard truth—the Military Diet is the quintessential definition of a “fad diet,” and it’s an eating plan that I would not recommend or advise anyone to follow. Not only does it provide inadequate nutrients, but the diet’s food choices and food group servings do not follow the guidelines that research suggests to maintain health and prevent disease.
Make sure you plan out your military diet’s 4 days off carefully. It’s best if you know exactly what you’ll be eating so you can have the right food ready at home.  This will help you to avoid the temptation of eating junk food or overeating. You don’t want to gain back the weight you just worked so hard to lose on the 3 Day Military Diet- so push through the following 4 days with the same intensity, resolve and discipline. Then, if you want to lose even more weight, repeat the cycle starting with the 3 Day Military Diet all over again.
While the DASH diet includes solid nutrition recommendations, it can be hard for someone new to these recommendations to make food palatable. We are used to sugar and salt as the major "flavors" of our meals. To make the healthy foods in the DASH diet more appealing, be generous with herbs and spices. There are a number of salt-free spice blends that can be used for many recipes. Some options include
The Mediterranean style eating pattern focuses on mostly plant-based foods like vegetables, fruit, whole grains, cereals, nuts, seeds, and beans, seasonally fresh, and locally grown foods. Olive oil is the main source of fat.  This eating pattern also includes a small amount of dairy products, such as cheese and yogurt, fish, and poultry. Red meat is limited. Wine can be consumed in small amounts (1-2 glasses of wine per day) with meals. 
The show premiered in 2017 and tells the story of the Hammond family: Joel (Timothy Olyphant), Sheila (Barrymore) and their teenage daughter Abby (Liv Hewson). Joel and Sheila are a real estate power couple until something makes her so violently ill that she dies and becomes undead. Now they spend their days trying to satisfy her taste for human flesh while covering up the string of (somewhat) unintentional murders trailing behind them.
Barrymore returns as Sheila Hammond, an undead realtor with a hunger for human flesh, in Santa Clarita Diet season two alongside Timothy Olyphant as Joel Hammond. The new season picks up right where season one ended; Shelia is still an insatiable zombie (of sorts), occasionally giving in to her hunger for humans. The result? Barrymore gets covered in fake blood, guts and all sorts of things that look like they're straight out of a zombie apocalypse.
The new season also adds some recurring new faces and a bunch of guest stars, including Joel McHale, Gerald McRaney, Zachary Knighton, and Maggie Lawson. McHale and Lawson step into the shoes of Chris and Christa, a successful, type-A married realtor couple who expose Joel and Sheila’s competitive streak. Castle and This Is Us star Gerald McRaney also joins the cast as Ed Thune, a retired army colonel Joel finds intimidating, while Zachary Knighton plays a laid-back Serbian Californian on a ruthless quest to uncover the truth about the undead. Check out EW’s first look at the Rolodex of guest stars here.
Sautéed carrots and onions. Sauté 1 medium onion, thinly sliced, in 1 tablespoon olive oil or canola oil. Add about 8 ounces sliced carrots, and continue to sauté until the carrots are soft. Add 1 thin pat of butter at the end. (Hints: Top the turkey with the sautéed carrots for extra flavor. If you like very soft carrots, microwave first before sautéing.)
Even if you’re seeing improvement with regular exercise, do not change your prescribed insulin regimen without consulting your doctor. Test prior to, during, and after exercise if you are on insulin and adding or making changes to your exercise program. This is true even if you think the insulin is causing you to gain weight. Changing your insulin plan could have a dangerous effect on your blood sugar levels. These changes could cause life-threatening complications.
Contrary to popular belief, not all carbs are off-limits if you’re managing diabetes. In fact, the ADA recommends vitamin-rich whole grains in a healthy diabetes diet. These foods contain fiber, which is beneficial for digestive health. Fiber can also promote feelings of fullness, preventing you from reaching for unhealthy snacks, and it can help slow the rise of blood sugar. Plus, whole grains contain healthy vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals that are healthy for anyone, regardless of whether they have diabetes or not.

Dash to a healthier you! Voted by health experts as the best overall diet three years in a row, the DASH Diet – originally developed to fight high blood pressure – is a safe and easy-to-follow eating plan that fights diseases and can even help you lose weight. Incorporate this two-phase plan from Marla Heller’s The DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution with bonus sample day menus for both phases. Find out if the DASH Diet is right for you. For more meal ideas, try these recipes!
Season one ends with a cliffhanger: Sheila’s condition is deteriorating, and the family chains her up in the basement for fear that she’ll run wild and infect others. This is standard zombie procedure — the uninfected are always quarantining the infected in a futile effort to prevent the spread of the disease. For a second, it looks like Santa Clarita Diet is going to become a more standard zombie narrative, all about the danger of contact and the struggle to keep people apart.
Crandall says that lower-calorie sugar substitutes are scientifically safe, according to the Food and Drug Administration, but I still don’t get the theory behind cutting sugar cravings by including sugar substitutes when they’re just as sweet. And I really don’t understand being made to treat fruits as the bad guy when they provide so many healthy benefits.
The DASH trial showed that dietary patterns can and do affect blood pressure in the high normal BP to moderately hypertensive adult population (systolic < 180 mm Hg & diastolic of 80 to 95 mm Hg).[9] Respectively, the DASH or “combination” diet lowered blood pressures by an average of 5.5 and 3.0 mm Hg for systolic and diastolic, compared with the control diet. The minority portion of the study sample and the hypertensive portion both showed the largest reductions in blood pressure from the combination diet against the control diet. The hypertensive subjects experienced a drop of 11.4 mm Hg in their systolic and 5.5 mm Hg in their diastolic phases.[9] The fruits-and-vegetables diet was also successful, although it produced more modest reductions compared with the control diet (2.8 mm Hg systolic and 1.1 mm Hg diastolic).[10] In the subjects with and without hypertension, the combination diet effectively reduced blood pressure more than the fruits-and-vegetables diet or the control diet did. The data indicated that reductions in blood pressure occurred within two weeks of subjects’ starting their designated diets,[10] and that the results were generalizable to the target sample of the U.S. population.[9] Side effects were negligible, but the NEJM study reports that some subjects reported constipation as a problem. At the end of the intervention phase, 10.1, 5.4 & 4.0 percent of the subjects reported this problem for the control, fruits-and-vegetables and combination diets, respectively, showing that the fruits and vegetables and combination diets reduce constipation. Apart from only one subject (on the control diet) who was suffering from cholecystitis, other gastrointestinal symptoms had a low rate of incidence.
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