Check these links for more information on The DASH Diet Action Plan, The DASH Diet Weight Loss Solution, The Everyday DASH Diet Cookbook, DASH diet in the news, DASH diet research, the author Marla Heller, MS, RD, Marla in the media, DASH social media, or to book her for a seminar. We support the American Heart Month (February), the Go Red for Women campaign, and the National Wear Red Day (February 2, 2018), promoting awareness about women's heart health. Check out our blog, and don't forget to join our free online support group on Facebook.
Day two is even lighter fare. For breakfast, have one slice of whole-wheat toast, one egg cooked however you like, and half a banana. Lunch is one cup of cottage cheese, one hard-boiled egg, and five (yep, count 'em out) saltine crackers. Dinner features two hot dogs (just the hot dogs themselves, no buns or condiments), one cup of broccoli, a half cup of carrots, half a banana, and one half cup of vanilla ice cream.
DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and the diet was developed for a research study in the early 1990s.1 The purpose of the study was to identify a food-based strategy to lower blood pressure. Even though the original research was quite a long time ago, scientists recently conducted a meta-analysis for a DASH diet review to summarize how much blood pressure can be reduced by the DASH diet. The study found, on average, people reduce their blood pressure by 6.7 mmHg systolic and 3.5 mmHg diastolic in just two weeks. The more sodium is restricted, the lower blood pressure goes.
For the first three days, the diet consists of three distinct meal plans. For the first day, breakfast consists of half a grapefruit, a slice of whole-wheat toast with 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, and a cup of caffeinated black tea or coffee. If you can't drink it black, it's recommended you sweeten it with a natural sugar substitute, like Stevia. For lunch, have half a cup of tuna (you can buy 3 oz or 5 oz cannes of cooked tuna, or prepare it yourself), one slice of whole-wheat toast, and a second cup of black coffee or tea. Dinner is the more filling meal, consisting of 3 oz of meat, one cup of green beans, half a banana, one small apple, and one cup of vanilla ice cream for dessert.
This means that a person who has worked with a dietitian and a diabetes treatment team to figure out how many grams of carbohydrate they can eat throughout the day can decide at any given meal what they will eat. Those with diabetes who are not on insulin need to focus on keeping the amount of carbohydrate they eat consistent throughout the day. Those on insulin can decide both what and how much to eat at a given meal (as long as it doesn't exceed their daily allotment), and can then adjust their insulin accordingly. "There aren't any foods that are 'off-limits,'" says Campbell. "Rather , one just needs to learn how to spend his or her grams of carbohydrate wisely over the course of the day."

I have been on South Beach for a little short of 4 weeks. I have lost 11 1/2 pounds. I don’t find the food too bad, but I ordered what I wanted. I tried 1 or 2 of most frozen foods, and only found about 3 that I really didn’t like. I did Nutrisystem several years ago, and those vacuum packed meals were disgusting. I am only doing frozen with South Beach. My only problem has been (sorry about this) constipation. Which surprises me since I am eating more veggies and drinking lots more water. So far the only complaint I have is the customer service, which is terrible. The southbeachdiet.com website also has issues, and it is hard to get anyone to help you. The Chat is a joke.
If you choose to finish dieting after these last 4 days, you should also strive to maintain a healthy diet full of healthy fats, proteins, lots of fresh fruit and vegetables and whole grains. You can find more information about losing weight through a healthy, 1700 calorie diet here. Other ideas for leading a healthy diet are also discussed in the sections below.
Richard K. Bernstein is critical of the standard American Diabetes Association diet plan. His plan includes very limited carbohydrate intake (30 grams per day) along with frequent blood glucose monitoring, regular strenuous muscle-building exercise and, for people using insulin, frequent small insulin injections if needed. His treatment target is "near normal blood sugars" all the time.[27]
Wave bye bye to soft drinks. Even zero-calorie ones. Or perhaps, especially no-calorie, diet soft drinks. In recent years, consumption of these “diet” drinks has been linked to greater weight gain, not less. And more recently, researchers have noted a link between intake of these beverages and a greater risk of both stroke and dementia. That includes Alzheimer’s disease. Yes, you read that right: artificially-sweetened drink consumption is associated with a significantly greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Even sugar-laced soft drinks aren’t that dangerous.
It seems beyond silly that phase one essentially equates eating a banana with eating a brownie, forbidding both even though they are clearly not the same whatsoever. But at the same time, you are allowed to have artificial sweeteners. And I did begin to crave the sugar-free chocolate syrup and the sugar substitute that I had in my so-necessary endless cups of coffee—and I still do today.

No matter which type of diet you choose to follow, avoiding protein deficiency is important for a number of reasons, including controlling your appetite and preventing muscle loss. People who eat more protein usually report that they tend to feel satisfied for longer between meals and have better self-control when it comes to preventing snacking or overeating.


Another critic of the ADA program is futurologist and transhumanist Ray Kurzweil, who with Terry Grossman co-authored Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever (published 2004). They describe the ADA guidelines as "completely ineffective". Their observations are that the condition, particularly in its early stages, can be controlled through a diet that sharply reduces carbohydrate consumption. Their guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes is a diet that includes a reduction of carbohydrates to one sixth of total caloric intake and elimination of high glycemic load carbohydrates. As someone who was diagnosed with diabetes but who no longer has symptoms of the disease, Kurzweil is a firm advocate of this approach. However, Kurzweil's prescription changed somewhat between his 1993 book The 10% Solution for a Healthy Life, in which he recommended that only 10% of calories should come from fat, and Fantastic Voyage, which recommends 25%.
Developed by noted Miami cardiologist Dr. Arthur Agatston for his patients, THE SOUTH BEACH DIET became a national phenomenon-because it works. It's not low fat. It's not low carbs. It teaches you to use the right carbs and the right fats to change your body chemistry to burn fat, help reduce your cholesterol, and help prevent metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes). As a result, you'll lose weight quickly and safely.
Nope — and it’s not the diet’s only name. Some know it by the Navy diet, the Army diet, or even the ice cream diet, since the three day menu allots for at least a few bites of vanilla ice cream each evening. Personally, we like to think that it’s called the military diet because it takes military-level self-control to stick to the restrictive meal plan.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
If you don't eat meat — or any animal products, for that matter — or if you have a food allergy, you can replace anything on the meal plan with foods that have a similar calorie count and provide the same nutrients. For example, instead of eating half a cup of tuna, you can eat about 2/3 cup of tofu. Instead of eating an egg at breakfast, you can drink a cup of soy milk. On day two of the military diet, cottage cheese substitution ideas include 15-20 almonds. Almonds work to sub out the slice of cheddar cheese, too. And instead of peanut butter, you can spread almond butter or sunflower butter on your toast for breakfast of day one.
Yes, Santa Clarita contains multitudes; it's everything above, and it treads that previously-invisible space between the genres brilliantly. This is a show where the sense of humor is as much part of the premise as time, location, or relationships – the way Amy Sherman-Palladino's fast-paced writing informed the speech patterns of every character on Gilmore Girls. Every character on this show is self-deprecating, keenly aware, and vocal about their lives with a meta-quality that on most shows would make commentary redundant. 
^ Jump up to: a b c Karanja, Njeri; Erlinger, TP; Pao-Hwa, Lin; Miller 3rd, Edgar R; Bray, George (September 2004). "The DASH Diet for High Blood Pressure: From Clinical Trial to Dinner Table". Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Lyndhurst, Ohio: The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. 71 (9): 745–53. doi:10.3949/ccjm.71.9.745. ISSN 0891-1150. PMID 15478706. Retrieved 2011-12-28.

PREMIER found that after six months, blood pressure levels declined in all three groups. The two groups that received counseling and followed a treatment plan had more weight loss than the advice-only group. However, participants who received counseling and followed the DASH diet had the greatest reductions in their blood pressure. The study results showed that people can lose weight and lower their blood pressure by following the DASH diet and increasing their physical activity.
Carbohydrates are the bodies' main source of energy and the nutrient that impacts blood sugar the most. People with diabetes need to monitor their carbohydrate intake because excess carbohydrates, particularly in the form of white, refined, processed, and sugary foods can elevate blood sugars and triglycerides and result in weight gain. When thinking about carbohydrates, you'll want to think about portions as well as type.

From the whole wheat toast, you’ll get plenty of carbohydrates, fiber, iron, Vitamin B-6, magnesium and calcium. You’re probably familiar with most of these vitamins and minerals. Calcium of course is important for healthy bones and teeth. Magnesium is also found in the bones; but is needed too for creating protein. Iron plays an important role in blood, specifically, it carries oxygen in the body (2). That’s why iron deficiencies can cause you to feel tired, as oxygen may move more slowly throughout your body. The peanut butter will fill you up with 8 grams of protein and healthy fats. Finally, both coffee and tea are full of antioxidants and caffeine to give you a kick start in energy. As a result, you can confidently choose either coffee or tea. If you want to obtain additional health benefits, try drinking green tea.
Sometimes, meals must be prepared in the field with limited resources. This meal was prepared out of UGR's, or Unitized Group Rations, using only a vat of boiling water. UGR's are pre-prepared, processed and shelf-stable foods packaged in hermetically sealed steam table containers. Each of the three breakfast and 14 lunch/dinner menus contains all necessary food and disposable items to feed 50 people, according to the Defense Logistics Agency.
Recently, the Military Diet began provided scientific evidence to support their program. The problem is that the science is about other diets, not about this 3-day program. For example, the website cites research conducted by nutrition scientist Krista Varady. But her research was conducted to support her diet (The Every Other Day Diet), not the Military Diet. There is some science to support intermittent fasting, but none (that I've seen) to support a hot dog and ice cream based plan.
Bean tostada: Bake 1 corn tortilla in 400-degree oven until crisp. Spread with ½ c cooked or canned pinto beans (rinsed) and 2 Tbsp shredded reduced-fat Mexican blend cheese. Return to oven for 5 to 10 minutes until cheese melts. Top with ¼ c salsa. Serve with a cabbage salad (1 c shredded cabbage and 1 chopped tomato with 2 Tbsp reduced-fat dressing).
As a self-described “nutrition nerd,” I couldn’t help but analyze the first three days of menus provided using my nutrient analysis software. You’ll see the daily totals at the bottom of each day, and while I can’t describe the intake as “good”, “ideal” or “healthy,” the data was slightly better than I expected. (Or perhaps, I really wasn’t sure what to expect from this very odd combination of foods!)
The Military 3-Day Diet plan is one of the most regimented diets that I’ve ever reviewed for Cooking Light. It’s free to sign up, and participants can download the plan directly from militarydiet.com. The plan is a weekly cycle that includes a three-day meal plan, followed by 4 days off. You can repeat this cycle as many times as you need until your weight loss goal is met.
Pay attention to the balance of macronutrients (fat, protein, and carbohydrates) in a meal to support stable blood sugar levels. Specifically, fat, protein, and fiber all slow down the absorption of carbohydrates and thus allow time for a slower, lower insulin release and a steady transport of glucose out of the blood and into the target tissues - this is a good thing.
I am gluten intolerant so couldn’t do this diet, as I couldn’t see any gluten free alternatives on the lists. I’m sure there are some, so I’d be interested to find out? Other than that… the diet isn’t something I would think of doing as a long term solution to losing weight. Once you finish the diet, then what? Of course you are going to go back to eating some what normally and then regain? Or that’s what I would imagine. I do like that this article seems to be unbiased and more of an informative piece, meaning you can make up your own mind rather than being ‘sold’ something. I guess if there was a special event you needed to lose a few pounds for it may be good, not sure that I would try it myself though.
Another critic of the ADA program is futurologist and transhumanist Ray Kurzweil, who with Terry Grossman co-authored Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever (published 2004). They describe the ADA guidelines as "completely ineffective". Their observations are that the condition, particularly in its early stages, can be controlled through a diet that sharply reduces carbohydrate consumption. Their guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes is a diet that includes a reduction of carbohydrates to one sixth of total caloric intake and elimination of high glycemic load carbohydrates. As someone who was diagnosed with diabetes but who no longer has symptoms of the disease, Kurzweil is a firm advocate of this approach. However, Kurzweil's prescription changed somewhat between his 1993 book The 10% Solution for a Healthy Life, in which he recommended that only 10% of calories should come from fat, and Fantastic Voyage, which recommends 25%.

This guideline isn’t as daunting as it may seem. “Make a salad with at least 2 cups of vegetables for lunch and have 2 cups of roasted, stir-fried or steamed vegetables at dinner. To get your last serving, either make an omelet with vegetables in the morning or snack on a cup of vegetables like cucumber, celery and bell pepper sticks during the day,” suggests Nour Zibdeh, RDN, an integrative and functional dietitian who specializes in digestive and autoimmune disorders.


During each of those scheduled three days, the military diet food plan is strict, and you’ll consume about 1,000-1,400 calories. Our calculations put most days around 1,150 calories. The four following days, you should aim to keep your calorie intake below 1,500 calories. For reference, the United States governments' Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion says that moderately active adult males need about 2,200-2,800 calories a day, and moderately active adult females need about 1,800-2,000 calories a day.
If losing up to 10 pounds isn't enough, people have followed the diet cycle for a full month. They repeat the cycle of 3 days on followed by 4 days off for a month. The Military Diet results on this plan are obviously much greater if you do multiple cycles- and you could conceivably lose 20-30 pounds if you do repeat the diet several times over. If choosing to go this route, make sure during the 4 days off the diet, you are eating a diet full of nutrients and vitamins that you may not be getting enough of during the 3 days on the strict regime. Another alternative is to give your body a bit more of a rest between cycles- and subsequently perform the 3 Day Military Diet once a month. This will also boost your military diet results, but more slowly and over a longer period of time.

It’s not exactly clear who did start the military diet and continues to be responsible for its growing popularity, but overall it doesn’t have a very credible history. The diet appears to be not much more than another fad diet scheme that has gained a growing following online. The bottom line? There haven’t been any published studies showing that the military diet is effective, safe or beneficial in any way long-term, so trying another weight loss approach seems like a wise idea.
Most people can lose weight on almost any diet, especially in the short term. Most important to weight loss is how many calories you take in and how many calories you burn off. A weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds a week is the typical recommendation. Although it may seem slow, it's a pace that's more likely to help you maintain your weight loss permanently.
This year marks the 20th anniversary of the publication showing the blood pressure–lowering effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.1 The DASH diet is considered an important advance in nutritional science. It emphasizes foods rich in protein, fiber, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, such as fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, and low-fat dairy. It also limits foods high in saturated fat and sugar.1 DASH is not a reduced-sodium diet, but its effect is enhanced by also lowering sodium intake.1 Since the creation of DASH 20 years ago, numerous trials have demonstrated that it consistently lowers blood pressure across a diverse range of patients with hypertension and prehypertension.
No shocker here: It turns out that the Military Diet isn’t quite the unique weight loss solution it’s made out to be. “This [diet concept] has been dressed up differently and brought out to dance before,” says Kimberly Gomer, R.D., director of nutrition at Pritikin Longevity Center. In other words, a restrictive three-day plan is nothing new in the health industry.

The original study to examine the efficacy of the DASH diet was conducted at four sites as a randomized controlled feeding study. While the diet provided 3,600 mg of sodium per day—significantly more than the current recommendation of 2,300 mg—it showed significant reductions in blood pressure as quickly as two weeks after the start of the diet, suggesting that the combination of foods and nutrients is what provides the greatest blood pressure-lowering effects.4


The DASH diet and the control diet at the lower salt levels were both successful in lowering blood pressure, but the largest reductions in blood pressure were obtained by eating a combination of these two (i.e., a lower-salt version of the DASH diet). The effect of this combination at a sodium level of 1,500 mg/day was an average blood pressure reduction of 8.9/4.5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic). The hypertensive subjects experienced an average reduction of 11.5/5.7 mm Hg.[10] The DASH-sodium results indicate that low sodium levels correlated with the largest reductions in blood pressure for participants at both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive levels, with the hypertensive participants showing the greatest reductions in blood pressure overall.

Today’s leading health organizations are heartily endorsing the DASH Diet for the informed health-conscious diner. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet has been recommended by the National Kidney Foundation and approved by The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, The American Heart Association, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and also forms the basis for the USDA MyPyramid.


If you’ve been looking for a new diet to try — or just scrolling through healthy recipes on Pinterest — you’ve probably come across the “Military Diet." It’s a new fad diet that promises to help you lose 10 pounds in about a week, even more if you’re lucky, and was supposedly named after a technique the military uses to help recruits shed pounds. But what’s the real deal on this diet? Does it work as well as its proponents claim — and can you really eat ice cream every day that you're on it? We took a closer look at the meal plan. Check it out.
When meal planning, it's always a great idea to plan your meals around non-starchy vegetables. This method will help to improve your nutrition and reduce your intake of excess calories, carbohydrates, and fat. A wonderful method to use is called the plate method. The plate method consists of making one-half of your plate non-starchy vegetables, such as salad, broccoli, peppers, etc.
The South Beach Diet is now a home-delivery program broken into three phrases. There's no counting calories, fat grams, carbohydrates or anything else – the bulk of your food shows up at your door. You'll receive three meals a day, plus snacks if you’ve ordered the “tier 2” program. The diet lasts as long as you want – it depends on your weight-loss goal.
The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is a dietary pattern promoted by the U.S.-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as one of its ideal eating plans for all Americans.[1]
Joel and Sheila discuss balancing killing people and being parents. Abby is grumpy with them for being overbearing. They make a plan to find a bad person to kill. Dan talks to them about never having a sloppy kill referring to the ants. They get supplies for killing people. Joel smokes pot in the bathroom to calm down. Eric and Abby have lunch while ditching school where Abby’s friend leaves with her 26-year-old drug dealer boyfriend, but he breaks up with her. Joel and Sheila talk to Rick, their other neighbor who is a cop, looking for where to find people to kill. He says that a pedophile lives in the area and the couple consider killing him. Sheila and Joel overhear the teenagers talking about how bad the ex-boyfriend was and decide to kill him. Once Joel talked to him he decides to let him go much to Sheila’s annoyance. The teenagers go to the ex-boyfriend's house; one of them teargasses it and retrieves her friend's sweater. On the way home, Sheila and Joel have a road rage incident then Sheila kills the driver of the other car. They put him in the freezer in their storage unit hoping he will not be missed. They go to family dinner and all three of them tell the others how wonderful everything is.
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