It’s not exactly clear who did start the military diet and continues to be responsible for its growing popularity, but overall it doesn’t have a very credible history. The diet appears to be not much more than another fad diet scheme that has gained a growing following online. The bottom line? There haven’t been any published studies showing that the military diet is effective, safe or beneficial in any way long-term, so trying another weight loss approach seems like a wise idea.
Data from the Multiethnic Cohort study, which included black, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, Latino, and white individuals, found that following a DASH-style diet significantly reduced the risk for colorectal cancer. The overall effect was greater in men than in women and was less strong among blacks compared with the other racial/ethnic groups.5
The first book describing the diet, The South Beach Diet, was written by Agatston and was released in April 2003.[4][15][19] By 2004 there about 8 million copies in print, a trade paperback South Beach Diet Good Fats/Good Carbs Guide had 3 million copies in print, and The South Beach Diet Cookbook went on sale with a printing of 1.75 million copies.[15]
You know that foods you find in the produce aisle are better for you than those that come in boxes, right? My rule is to stay away from any product that contains a lot of chemical-sounding ingredients on the label. Better yet, avoid foods that have labels! Whisk together your own salad dressing (it’s easy). Make your own pot of soup with fresh ingredients (and a lot less sodium). Stay away from the drive-through and cook your own meals.
The Military Diet promises up to a 10-pound weight loss in just one week—and includes foods like hot dogs and ice cream on its eating plan. Advocates suggest that the Military Diet’s approach was created by the United States military as a way to get quick results (hence the name). This is a pretty good marketing technique since characteristics many associate with members of the armed forces—discipline, efficiency, and effectiveness—are also desirable qualities for weight loss.

I encourage everyone to share their experiences and successes in the comment area below. Please feel free to cheer each other on, give helpful tips, make friends, and just have some fun! I hope everyone finds this page useful and that it helps you in your weight loss journey. (As usual, please use good manners and avoid rude comments. Keep it friendly and be polite!

More modern history of the diabetic diet may begin with Frederick Madison Allen and Elliott Joslin, who, in the early 20th century, before insulin was discovered, recommended that people with diabetes eat only a low-calorie and nearly zero-carbohydrate diet to prevent ketoacidosis from killing them. While this approach could extend life by a limited period, patients developed a variety of other medical problems.[9]


Jump up ^ Jönsson T, Ahrén B, Pacini G, Sundler F, Wierup N, Steen S, Sjöberg T, Ugander M, Frostegård J, Göransson L, Lindeberg S (November 2006). "A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs". Nutrition & Metabolism. 3 (39): 39. doi:10.1186/1743-7075-3-39. PMC 1635051. PMID 17081292.
Even though the diet does provide foods from serval food groups, registered dietitian Toby Amidor R.D. says it's not enough for complete daily nutrition—especially since high-calorie, low-nutrient foods like hot dogs and vanilla ice cream are part of the limited menu. "Due to the lack of adequate amounts of whole grains, vegetables, dairy, and protein, you won't be able to meet your complete nutrient needs over these three days," she explains.
The prevalence of hypertension led the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to propose funding to further research the role of dietary patterns on blood pressure. In 1992 the NHLBI worked with five of the most well-respected medical research centers in different cities across the U.S. to conduct the largest and most detailed research study to date. The DASH study used a rigorous design called a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and it involved teams of physicians, nurses, nutritionists, statisticians, and research coordinators working in a cooperative venture in which participants were selected and studied in each of these five research facilities. The chosen facilities and locales for this multi-center study were: (1) Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, (2) Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, (3) Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon, (4) Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and (5) Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.[2]

Pared down from the original two weeks to just seven days—a change made in 2017—Phase 1 is meant to jump-start your weight loss. The idea is to "transform your metabolism" with meals that are high in lean protein and low in carbs. At the same time, you begin to lose your cravings for sugar and refined starches—the same kinds of foods that may have piled on the pounds in the first place.

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More modern history of the diabetic diet may begin with Frederick Madison Allen and Elliott Joslin, who, in the early 20th century, before insulin was discovered, recommended that people with diabetes eat only a low-calorie and nearly zero-carbohydrate diet to prevent ketoacidosis from killing them. While this approach could extend life by a limited period, patients developed a variety of other medical problems.[9]


According to the website, the Military Diet requires you eat specific foods for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the course of three days. The meal plan is extremely calorie-restrictive: on the first day, for instance, you can only eat roughly 1078 calories. (For comparison, the average, moderately active male needs roughly 2400 to 2600 calories per day.)
Based on the evidence that well planned vegan diets can be lower in unhealthy processed foods than the standard American diet, some studies have investigated vegan interventions as a possible treatment for Type 2 Diabetes.[28]  These studies have shown that a vegan diet may be effective in managing type 2 diabetes.[29]  Plant-based diets tend to be higher in fiber, which slows the rate sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream.[30]  Additionally, simple carboydrates, abundant in processed foods, which are often not vegan, have the potential to elevate HbA1c levels more than other healthier foods.[31] In multiple clinical trials, participants who were placed on a vegan diet experienced a greater reduction in their Hemoglobin A1c levels than those who followed the diet recommended by the ADA.[29]

"Before the birth of my second child, my max weight was 241 pounds. I had gained double the weight with my second pregnancy, but had just accepted the weight gain as being healthy for myself and my baby girl. I was thinking that I would be able to lose it with no problem. Then, at my six week postpartum checkup, I was only down to 216 pounds. I thought to myself, "OK, now that it's been six weeks since my baby was born, I can get back on my exercise routine and lose this weight. No more of those, 'You just had a baby' excuses." Well, I got lazy, and my eating habits didn't change as I thought they would. I would catch myself eating double portions and getting second helpings to the cake, cookies, and all the other "good" stuff.
Joel and Sheila Hammond are realtors leading a normal suburban life with their daughter Abby. They are trying hard to sell a house but while showing it Sheila violently throws up extensively, including what might be an organ. Joel takes Sheila to the emergency department but since it is slow they go home. Sheila is acting oddly, including an increased libido; her blood is thick and she has no heartbeat. Their neighbor's son Eric explains to them that Sheila is dead and undead and driven by her Id, which Sheila is okay with. Eric tells them Sheila must always be fed, and if she degrades she may have to die. Sheila and Abby sneak out and buy a car, and later Sheila parties with her neighbors. Gary, Sheila's co-worker, entices Sheila to dance with him when Joel finds them. They leave and Sheila thinks her new behavior might be who she really is. At Sheila's home, Gary tries to force himself on her, threatening to tell others she was unfaithful if she refuses. Sheila licks his fingers, suddenly biting two of them off before devouring Gary in the backyard. Joel comes home to find Sheila eating Gary; as he looks on in horror, Sheila tells him she wants to make this work.
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