As mentioned above, the military diet is really nothing groundbreaking or special, just another low-calorie diet that can promote weight loss due to restricting how much someone eats. If you’re hoping to lose weight in a healthier, more sustainable way then I’d recommend considering a moderate ketogenic diet (a very low-carb diet that helps the body burn fat efficiently), incorporating intermittent fasting into your lifestyle, and perhaps trying other weight loss boosters, such as carb-cycling or high intensity interval training (HIIT). The ketogenic diet in particular can be helpful for lowering appetite and promoting steady weight loss. The keto diet works by severely limiting carbohydrate consumption and reducing the body’s energy supply, which then forces fat to become the primary energy source.

The South Beach Diet eliminates refined carbohydrates — white flour and sugar are the top culprits. People on the plan are urged to curb carbs and focus on lean protein, low-fat dairy, and healthy carbs — including whole grains, vegetables, and fruit — as a way to lose weight, improve their health, and reduce the cravings that put you in the typical hunger-overeat-gain-weight cycle.


So we hate to break it to you, but devouring hot dogs and ice cream probably won’t be your ticket to sustainable and healthy weight loss. “The idea that there’s something magical in a certain diet, that’s the American dream,” says Gomer. The Military Diet isn’t sustainable, she says. “You’ll get hungry and grouchy and you break your diet and [then] you’re looking for the next miracle.”

Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, and author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet and Belly Fat Diet For Dummies, feels similarly concerned. "A restrictive diet that does not promote the nutritional value of foods and is only focused on calories, such as the Military Diet, may promote weight loss at the expense of health," she says. "This diet is not sustainable and any weight loss will most likely be regained quickly." She even cautions that the diet may ultimately lead to weight gain down the road. "A drastic reduction in calories will promote weight loss, however restricting calories this low may promote a loss of both lean body mass (muscle mass) as well as fat mass, which makes it easier to regain the weight as soon as you return to normal eating habits."
DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and the diet was developed for a research study in the early 1990s.1 The purpose of the study was to identify a food-based strategy to lower blood pressure. Even though the original research was quite a long time ago, scientists recently conducted a meta-analysis for a DASH diet review to summarize how much blood pressure can be reduced by the DASH diet. The study found, on average, people reduce their blood pressure by 6.7 mmHg systolic and 3.5 mmHg diastolic in just two weeks. The more sodium is restricted, the lower blood pressure goes.
Nope — and it’s not the diet’s only name. Some know it by the Navy diet, the Army diet, or even the ice cream diet, since the three day menu allots for at least a few bites of vanilla ice cream each evening. Personally, we like to think that it’s called the military diet because it takes military-level self-control to stick to the restrictive meal plan.
When Anne puts it all together, she tracks Joel and Sheila to the desert where they’re attempting to eulogize Gary and send him off to the great real estate development in the sky. He has decided he wants to die, so they’re trying to honor his wishes, but when it comes right down to it, they can’t shoot him because he’s their friend. And this marks the third time in the episode I cried.

We reached out to two experts to see what they thought — and if the diet works. "It’s a low calorie diet that includes typical American foods," said Janis Jibrin, MS, RD, an adjunct professor of Nutrition at American University. "It’s nutritionally deficient, but not as crazy as some (i.e. juice fasts)." When it comes to the meal plan, she's not a fan. "It’s too low in many nutrients," she explains. Day 2 alone is "so low in fiber, iron, calcium and other nutrients, yet it manages to hit the daily sodium max. (Actually, most health authorities recommend 2,300 mg as a max, so this diet exceeds it.) Sure, the other four days offer more calories and nutrients, but even so, you’re still skimping."
You may have any kind of tuna or meat that you choose. Fresh or canned tuna doesn't make a difference for the 3 Day Military Diet. You can also choose between beef and turkey dogs; but it's recommended to avoid hot dogs from mixed meat sources. Since hot dogs aren't typically a nutritious choice, if you are concerned with your health and avoiding highly-processed food then another food option may be better for you. Just make sure that your meat or meat substitution for the 2 hot dogs contains between 250 and 350 calories, as that is the approximate calorie count in 2 hotdogs.
Joel and Sheila Hammond are realtors leading a normal suburban life with their daughter Abby. They are trying hard to sell a house but while showing it Sheila violently throws up extensively, including what might be an organ. Joel takes Sheila to the emergency department but since it is slow they go home. Sheila is acting oddly, including an increased libido; her blood is thick and she has no heartbeat. Their neighbor's son Eric explains to them that Sheila is dead and undead and driven by her Id, which Sheila is okay with. Eric tells them Sheila must always be fed, and if she degrades she may have to die. Sheila and Abby sneak out and buy a car, and later Sheila parties with her neighbors. Gary, Sheila's co-worker, entices Sheila to dance with him when Joel finds them. They leave and Sheila thinks her new behavior might be who she really is. At Sheila's home, Gary tries to force himself on her, threatening to tell others she was unfaithful if she refuses. Sheila licks his fingers, suddenly biting two of them off before devouring Gary in the backyard. Joel comes home to find Sheila eating Gary; as he looks on in horror, Sheila tells him she wants to make this work.
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