As mentioned above, the military diet is really nothing groundbreaking or special, just another low-calorie diet that can promote weight loss due to restricting how much someone eats. If you’re hoping to lose weight in a healthier, more sustainable way then I’d recommend considering a moderate ketogenic diet (a very low-carb diet that helps the body burn fat efficiently), incorporating intermittent fasting into your lifestyle, and perhaps trying other weight loss boosters, such as carb-cycling or high intensity interval training (HIIT). The ketogenic diet in particular can be helpful for lowering appetite and promoting steady weight loss. The keto diet works by severely limiting carbohydrate consumption and reducing the body’s energy supply, which then forces fat to become the primary energy source.
From the whole wheat toast, you’ll get plenty of carbohydrates, fiber, iron, Vitamin B-6, magnesium and calcium. You’re probably familiar with most of these vitamins and minerals. Calcium of course is important for healthy bones and teeth. Magnesium is also found in the bones; but is needed too for creating protein. Iron plays an important role in blood, specifically, it carries oxygen in the body (2). That’s why iron deficiencies can cause you to feel tired, as oxygen may move more slowly throughout your body. The peanut butter will fill you up with 8 grams of protein and healthy fats. Finally, both coffee and tea are full of antioxidants and caffeine to give you a kick start in energy. As a result, you can confidently choose either coffee or tea. If you want to obtain additional health benefits, try drinking green tea.
The military diet or the 3 day military diet is a weight loss diet plan that claims it can help you lose up to 10 pounds in a week. The 3 day military diet, also known as the Army diet or Navy diet, is similar to many of the other 3-day fad diet or crash plans that have been introduced in the past. The 3 day military diet involves a 3-day meal plan followed by 4 days off. The weekly cycle can be repeated until the weight goals are reached.
Just before her birthday, Rocio decided to lose a few pounds by following the Military Diet. Using an old photocopy her mom had given her from years before, Rocio got started with the diet. Rocio shares with viewers that her mom has been using the diet for years, and had encouraged her to try it. So, although there’s been a lot of hype recently about the diet, it’s by no means new. You’ll notice that her Military Diet plan varies from the one we’ve listed- probably due to the fact that there are various versions of the diet floating around online. Rocio was able to lose 7 pounds while on the diet. She reports that she didn’t feel hungry; but she thinks that drinking water and staying strong mentally helped her. However, due to a birthday cake binge, she gained back 2 pounds after completing the diet. That’s an important reminder to all of us: avoid binge-eating after completing the diet or the pounds will come right back on! Take a look at her experience.
The diet doesn't offer balanced nutrition: some of the recommended foods are high in sodium, the reduced calorie intake is below the recommended allotment for both men and women, and you may not receive sufficient fiber, vitamins, and minerals during this three-day period. Prolonged application of the diet may weaken your organs and immunity as well as increase your risk of heart damage.

Trigylcerides are fatty molecules that travel in the bloodstream. Excess sugar and fat can increase triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are also manufactured in the liver. The body uses triglycerides for energy, but excess triglycerides are a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, and obesity. Many lifestyle factors can influence triglyceride levels.


I’ve heard of the military diet and have contemplated it, but haven’t tried it as of yet. As I get light-headed very easily, this may NOT be the diet for me to try at all. I know a couple of people who have done it and benefited from it, but they said it was hard in the beginning. For me, the cons outweigh the pros. I just can’t risk any health issues arising from it.
The original study to examine the efficacy of the DASH diet was conducted at four sites as a randomized controlled feeding study. While the diet provided 3,600 mg of sodium per day—significantly more than the current recommendation of 2,300 mg—it showed significant reductions in blood pressure as quickly as two weeks after the start of the diet, suggesting that the combination of foods and nutrients is what provides the greatest blood pressure-lowering effects.4
There are no meetings to attend or packaged meals to buy. The food is easy to find in the grocery store, and there’s very little cooking or food prep needed. But you may feel very hungry on the diet, so you may need willpower to get through 3 days without cheating. You’ll only be eating about 1,500 calories daily, so you may feel more sluggish than usual. If you choose to exercise, it may make you even more tired.

The military diet is similar to other three-day diet plans (think: the Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic three-day diet plans) as it claims to promote weight loss in a short period of time by restricting calories. The diet also bears a striking resemblance to the retro Drinking Man's Diet (or the Air Force Diet) of the '60s, according to Adrienne Rose Johnson Bitar, Ph.D., postdoctoral associate at Cornell University who specializes in the history and culture of American food, pop culture, and health. Much like the military diet, the Drinking Man's Diet incorporated martinis and steak in the diet but kept carbohydrate and calorie counts fairly low, she explains. "Both of these diets were low-calorie or low-carb plans that promised impressive short-term results, but included unhealthy or indulgent foods," says Bitar. (Another unhealthy diet trend that includes lots of red meat: The Vertical Diet. Safe to say, you can skip that diet plan, too.)
Basically, whatever you want — but you're only allotted 1,500 calories per day, so if you want to feel full, your best bet is sticking to healthy fare. The advantage is that instead of limiting yourself to the menu laid out for you on the first three days, you can divvy those calories up however you'd like. You can fill up on a salad, eat plenty of small fruit snacks throughout the day, or focus on your proteins. It's up to you and whatever you decide to make of it.
The diet I recommend in my book Healthy Aging: A Lifelong Guide to your Physical and Spiritual Well-Being is similar to the DASH diet with the addition of omega-3 fatty acids and natural anti-inflammatory spices such as turmeric and ginger. Both are similar to the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, crusty breads, whole grains, and olive oil as well as more fish and legumes and less meat and poultry than the typical Western diet contains. Whether you’re trying to lower blood pressure or simply eat well, you can’t go wrong with the DASH diet, or with the alternatives mentioned above.
2. Simple carbohydrates (high glycemic load foods, or foods that are not part of a type 2 diabetes diet plan because they raise blood sugar levels) are processed foods, and don't contain other nutrients to slow down sugar absorption and thus these foods can raise blood sugar dangerously fast. Many simple carbohydrates are easily recognized as "white foods."
Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco for the streaming service Netflix, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant.[1] Fresco serves as the showrunner, and is an executive producer alongside Drew Barrymore, Timothy Olyphant, Aaron Kaplan, Tracy Katsky, Chris Miller, Ember Truesdell and Ruben Fleischer.[2][3]
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