The DASH diet is a recognized treatment for hypertension, heart disease, and kidney disease. The DASH diet can slow the progression of both heart disease and kidney disease. If you already have chronic kidney disease, you should speak with your doctor and dietitian before starting any new diets as you may have special restrictions to consider. The DASH diet should not be used by people on dialysis. Individuals on dialysis have special dietary needs that should be discussed with a registered dietitian.
The Military Diet is what we in the fitness world call a “crash diet.” Crash diets are designed for quick weight loss in a short amount of time. These diets – and I can included “cleanses” here – prey on people’s desperation to “get fit quick.” They know that if you follow a short term diet, lose a bunch of water weight, and see a lower number on the scale – you’re convinced it worked and then you can go back to how you were eating before.
The South Beach Diet says that it'll teach you about eliminating so-called "bad" carbs from your diet. It uses the glycemic index and glycemic load to determine which carbs you should avoid. Foods with a high glycemic index tend to increase your blood sugar faster, higher and longer than do foods with a lower index. Some evidence suggests that this increase in blood sugar can boost your appetite, leading to increased eating and weight gain and possibly diabetes, which can all contribute to cardiovascular disease.
Trigylcerides are fatty molecules that travel in the bloodstream. Excess sugar and fat can increase triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are also manufactured in the liver. The body uses triglycerides for energy, but excess triglycerides are a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, and obesity. Many lifestyle factors can influence triglyceride levels.
The Military 3-Day Diet plan is one of the most regimented diets that I’ve ever reviewed for Cooking Light. It’s free to sign up, and participants can download the plan directly from militarydiet.com. The plan is a weekly cycle that includes a three-day meal plan, followed by 4 days off. You can repeat this cycle as many times as you need until your weight loss goal is met.
This year marks the 20th anniversary of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. The diet, which emphasizes foods rich in protein, fiber, potassium, magnesium, and calcium (fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, and low-fat dairy), has been shown time and again to be effective in lowering elevated blood pressure. More recent research has suggested it also can be effective in reducing inflammation markers, lowering the risk of developing kidney disease (a common complication of hypertension), and decreasing levels of low-density lipoproteins (an established risk factor for CVD) and several types of cancer.
The Military Diet’s focus on small quantities of high-fat food might leave you feeling hungry, too. “This is allowing a very little bit of rich food,” explains Gomer, noting that you’ll still feel hungry despite indulging in ice cream each night. “It makes me frustrated because I could give people six times the amount of food [for the same amount of calories],” says Gomer.
More modern history of the diabetic diet may begin with Frederick Madison Allen and Elliott Joslin, who, in the early 20th century, before insulin was discovered, recommended that people with diabetes eat only a low-calorie and nearly zero-carbohydrate diet to prevent ketoacidosis from killing them. While this approach could extend life by a limited period, patients developed a variety of other medical problems.[9]
Trigylcerides are fatty molecules that travel in the bloodstream. Excess sugar and fat can increase triglyceride levels. Triglycerides are also manufactured in the liver. The body uses triglycerides for energy, but excess triglycerides are a risk factor for heart attack, stroke, and obesity. Many lifestyle factors can influence triglyceride levels.
Agatston believes that the faster sugar and starch are absorbed and the faster they enter the bloodstream, the fatter you will get. He suggests eating foods and combination of foods ( i.e., proteins, fat and small amounts of carbohydrates) that cause gradual rather than a sharp increase in blood sugar. Agatston makes distinction between good and bad carbohydrates. This is based on the glycemic index (GI). GI tells you how fast 50 grams of a particular food turns into sugar. Carbohydrates with a high GI raise blood sugar levels rapidly, while carbohydrates with low GI do it much slower. Examples of foods with high GI is white wheat bread, potatoes and various kinds of cereals. Green vegetables, whole grains, and beans are examples of foods with low GI.
The patient later admitted to having been on the South Beach Diet at the time of presentation, having adhered to a particularly strict (less than 20 grams carbohydrate daily) form of this low carbohydrate diet plan. The patient stated that he had eliminated virtually all forms of carbohydrate from his diet for the three weeks prior to his presentation and had lost 16 pounds (7.3 kg) over the same time period. Following discharge, the patient discontinued the low carbohydrate diet plan and he has remained asymptomatic and euglycemic over the following two years while maintaining a BMI of 27.
^ Jump up to: a b Bantle JP, Wylie-Rosett J, Albright AL, Apovian CM, Clark NG, Franz MJ, Hoogwerf BJ, Lichtenstein AH, Mayer-Davis E, Mooradian AD, Wheeler ML (September 2006). "Nutrition recommendations and interventions for diabetes--2006: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association". Diabetes Care. 29 (9): 2140–57. doi:10.2337/dc06-9914. PMID 16936169.
And, of course, the low-cal nature of the military diet can dangerous, says Amidor. This is especially true if you plan to exercise: Attempting to do high-intensity workouts on such a low-calorie diet could potentially cause you to become weak, light-headed, and fatigued—so low-intensity cardio or walking is your safest option during this diet, says Allen.
Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco for the streaming service Netflix, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant.[1] Fresco serves as the showrunner, and is an executive producer alongside Drew Barrymore, Timothy Olyphant, Aaron Kaplan, Tracy Katsky, Chris Miller, Ember Truesdell and Ruben Fleischer.[2][3]
×