The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is a dietary pattern promoted by the U.S.-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as one of its ideal eating plans for all Americans.[1]
Nope — and it’s not the diet’s only name. Some know it by the Navy diet, the Army diet, or even the ice cream diet, since the three day menu allots for at least a few bites of vanilla ice cream each evening. Personally, we like to think that it’s called the military diet because it takes military-level self-control to stick to the restrictive meal plan.
There's not a lot of reliable information available about how the military diet plan was started — or, for that matter, who started it. MilitaryDiet.co and TheMilitaryDiet.com, the two main resource sites for the diet regimen, are both run by fans and proponents of the diet without any cited health professional credentials. According to them, though, the military diet plan is an intermittent fasting diet that combines three days of a strict, low-calorie meal plan with four days of eating whatever you want (as long as it still falls below the calorie intake).
Despite the widespread use of weight reducing low carbohydrate diets for many years now, few reports to date have highlighted their association with clinically relevant ketoacidosis [6,7]. This either means that it is a rare complication, or that it has, so far, not been recognized as a possible complication of a very strict low carbohydrate diet. The hyperglycemic ketoacidosis could easily, in the past, have simply been passed off as a complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome (the low carbohydrate diet being viewed as an irrelevancy). It could also be that some people are applying the diet in an ever increasingly more fanatical way. A final possibility is that the syndrome is brought about by some, as yet unknown, trigger in persons on a very low carbohydrate diet.
Instead of having processed wheat toast, try having a small portion of whole grains (such as gluten-free oats, quinoa or brown rice) or better yet a totally unprocessed source of carbohydrates like a baked sweet potato. Another option is to skip the grains and starchy veggies altogether, substituting them for 1/4 cup of plain yogurt with a teaspoon of flaxseeds.
It's always a good idea to meet with a registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator to determine how many carbohydrates are right for you. Keep in mind that every gram of carbohydrates contains about four calories. Therefore, if you are eating, 45 grams of carbohydrate per meal, and 30 grams per snack, you'll be ingesting 660 calories from carbohydrates per day. 
The goal of any changes you make to your diet should be to help establish healthier habits to allow you to feel your best. The military diet won’t teach you how to respond effectively to your body’s hunger or fullness signals, won’t prepare you to plan healthy meals and cook for yourself for years to come, and won’t guide you toward finding healthier substitutions for unhealthy foods that cause you to overeat.
The diet plan was initially developed for Agatston's own patients. Agatston noticed that the American Heart Association's then-recommended low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet was not lowering his patients' weight, cholesterol or blood sugar levels, but that his patients on the Atkins diet were experiencing weight loss. Unwilling to prescribe the Atkins approach to patients with cardiac issues due to the diet's allowance of saturated fat and limitation of carbohydrates containing fiber and other nutrients, Agatston referenced medical research to build an eating plan that categorized fats and carbohydrates as good or bad and emphasized lean protein and fiber.[17]
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The longer answer, according to MilitaryDiet.co, is that it “comprises carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats, all of which are needed for optimal body function.” At least in theory. But the short answer is that you're seriously limiting your calorie consumption. As mentioned, moderately active adult women need about 1,800-2,000 calories a day, so by following the military diet plan, you're effectively cutting your calories by nearly half. And though you're indulging with some ice cream, most of the foods on the menu are ultimately pretty lean as well.
Yes, Santa Clarita contains multitudes; it's everything above, and it treads that previously-invisible space between the genres brilliantly. This is a show where the sense of humor is as much part of the premise as time, location, or relationships – the way Amy Sherman-Palladino's fast-paced writing informed the speech patterns of every character on Gilmore Girls. Every character on this show is self-deprecating, keenly aware, and vocal about their lives with a meta-quality that on most shows would make commentary redundant. 
When Anne puts it all together, she tracks Joel and Sheila to the desert where they’re attempting to eulogize Gary and send him off to the great real estate development in the sky. He has decided he wants to die, so they’re trying to honor his wishes, but when it comes right down to it, they can’t shoot him because he’s their friend. And this marks the third time in the episode I cried.
Santa Clarita Diet is an American horror-comedy web television series created by Victor Fresco for the streaming service Netflix, starring Drew Barrymore and Timothy Olyphant.[1] Fresco serves as the showrunner, and is an executive producer alongside Drew Barrymore, Timothy Olyphant, Aaron Kaplan, Tracy Katsky, Chris Miller, Ember Truesdell and Ruben Fleischer.[2][3]
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