The South Beach Diet's program differs from other low-carb diets in that it restricts saturated fats and high-sugar carbs. The first two-week phase of the diet focuses on maintaining your blood sugar levels and eliminating cravings for sweets and "bad" carbs. Such foods include bread, rice, fruit and baked goods. The second phase introduces some carbs, including pasta, rice and some fruits, back into your diet. The final, indefinite stage involves continuing to make healthy eating choices to maintain your health and target weight.
At the same time, other research has linked sugar-sweetened beverage consumption to a greater risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. The upshot seems to be this: Stop drinking any beverages that have been sugar- or artificially sweetened, and switch to water, tea or coffee. Incidentally, drinking coffee has recently been associated with longer life. Another recent study concluded that long-term consumption of coffee is linked to a “modest decrease in risk” of developing hypertension. There’s no need to fear caffeine, either. Yet another study recently noted that moderate caffeine consumption, even in the absence of coffee drinking, is linked to a reduced risk of all-cause mortality.
When meal planning, it's always a great idea to plan your meals around non-starchy vegetables. This method will help to improve your nutrition and reduce your intake of excess calories, carbohydrates, and fat. A wonderful method to use is called the plate method. The plate method consists of making one-half of your plate non-starchy vegetables, such as salad, broccoli, peppers, etc.
The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is a dietary pattern promoted by the U.S.-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as one of its ideal eating plans for all Americans.[1]
Low Carb Diet: It has been suggested that the removal of carbohydrates from the diet and replacement with fatty foods such as nuts, seeds, meats, fish, oils, eggs, avocados, olives, and vegetables may help reverse diabetes. Fats would become the primary calorie source for the body, and complications due to insulin resistance would be minimized.[27]
Joel and Sheila Hammond are realtors leading a normal suburban life with their daughter Abby. They are trying hard to sell a house but while showing it Sheila violently throws up extensively, including what might be an organ. Joel takes Sheila to the emergency department but since it is slow they go home. Sheila is acting oddly, including an increased libido; her blood is thick and she has no heartbeat. Their neighbor's son Eric explains to them that Sheila is dead and undead and driven by her Id, which Sheila is okay with. Eric tells them Sheila must always be fed, and if she degrades she may have to die. Sheila and Abby sneak out and buy a car, and later Sheila parties with her neighbors. Gary, Sheila's co-worker, entices Sheila to dance with him when Joel finds them. They leave and Sheila thinks her new behavior might be who she really is. At Sheila's home, Gary tries to force himself on her, threatening to tell others she was unfaithful if she refuses. Sheila licks his fingers, suddenly biting two of them off before devouring Gary in the backyard. Joel comes home to find Sheila eating Gary; as he looks on in horror, Sheila tells him she wants to make this work.
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