Since then, several studies have shown the DASH dietary pattern to have a wide range of benefits. A recent examination of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data found that following a DASH-style diet was associated with metabolic health (eg, fasting glucose, insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, and high-density lipoproteins) in young, healthy overweight, and obese individuals.5
Any diet that's low in saturated fat is tough to follow, even with intensive dietary counseling.11 To address that issue, a study by Chiu and colleagues published in 2016 examined the effectiveness of a DASH dietary pattern that was much higher in both total fat (40% of calories vs 27% of calories) and saturated fat (14% of calories vs 8% of calories) and found that when the rest of the diet is followed, the benefits on blood pressure and blood lipids were the same. While the higher-fat diet was higher in total fat and saturated fat, and provided more full-fat dairy than the original DASH diet, it provided more vegetables, more nuts and legumes, less sugar, and less fruit and fruit juice. The higher-fat version might make it easier to follow and stick with over the long term. However, Heller says the study sample size was small and the study was of a short duration.
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^ Jump up to: a b c Emadian A, Andrews RC, England CY, Wallace V, Thompson JL (November 2015). "The effect of macronutrients on glycaemic control: a systematic review of dietary randomised controlled trials in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes in which there was no difference in weight loss between treatment groups". The British Journal of Nutrition. 114 (10): 1656–66. doi:10.1017/S0007114515003475. PMC 4657029. PMID 26411958.

The nutritional highlight of the diet is protein. Where calories, vitamins and minerals may be missing- protein is a priority. Protein is included heavily in all three meals every day. When following a low-calorie diet, protein can really help your body preserve your muscle and metabolism, boosting your weight loss success. This is a positive aspect of the diet.

The plate method. The American Diabetes Association offers a simple seven-step method of meal planning. In essence, it focuses on eating more vegetables. When preparing your plate, fill one-half of it with nonstarchy vegetables, such as spinach, carrots and tomatoes. Fill one-quarter with a protein, such as tuna or lean pork. Fill the last quarter with a whole-grain item or starchy food. Add a serving of fruit or dairy and a drink of water or unsweetened tea or coffee.
Many sources place the South Beach Diet on lists of "low carb" diets such as the Atkins Diet. While the South Beach diet does prohibit foods rich in simple carbohydrates such as white bread, white potatoes and white rice,[12] it does not require dieters to forgo carbohydrates entirely or even measure their intake. Instead, it focuses on the "glycemic impact" (short term change in blood glucose) of foods. (Nutritionists continue, however, to question the net benefit of the first phase to dieters not affected by impaired glucose metabolism.) Many vegetables are permitted even in phase 1. Complex, fiber-rich carbohydrate sources such as brown rice and 100% whole grain bread are permitted during phase 2. Agatston has tried to distance the South Beach Diet from "low carb" approaches; in the South Beach Diet book he wrote: "It is my purpose to teach neither low-fat nor low-carb. I want you to learn to choose the right fats and the right carbs."[13]:22–23
As Agatston outlines in his book, the long-term effects of following the South Beach Diet — beyond just losing weight — include lowering your cholesterol, along with your risk of heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and even some cancers. Those are long-term effects that most diets don’t offer simply because they aren’t set up for you to stick with them indefinitely.
Currently, hypertension is thought to affect roughly 50 million people in the U.S. and approximately 1 billion worldwide.[6][7] According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), citing data from 2002,[6][7] “The relationship between BP and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events is continuous, consistent, and independent of other risk factors. The higher the BP, the greater is the chance of heart attack, heart failure, stroke, and kidney disease. For individuals 40–70 years of age, each increment of 20 mm Hg in systolic BP (SBP) or 10 mm Hg in diastolic BP (DBP) doubles the risk of CVD across the entire BP range from 115/75 to 185/115 mm Hg.”.[7]
Joel and Sheila Hammond are everyday suburban real estate agents in Santa Clarita, California.[8] The couple face a series of obstacles when Sheila has a physical transformation into a zombie and starts craving human flesh. With Joel and the family trying to help Sheila through the trying time, they have to deal with neighbors, cultural norms and getting to the bottom of a potentially mythological mystery.[9]
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