The Military Diet is a very calorie-restricted 3 day diet that's based on the principles of consuming the right combination of metabolism-boosting foods. The diet also incorporates the idea of intermittent fasting with 3 days of very restricted eating followed by 4 days of a more moderate approach. While the diet itself is pretty straight forward, it's not for the faint of heart. This diet may be exceedingly difficult to stick with because it must be followed exactingly.
The Diabetes Plate Method is another option that uses many of the ideas from the eating patterns described above and can be a great place to start for many people with diabetes.  This method uses a 9 inch plate.  The first step for many people is to use a smaller plate than they have been eating from.  Once you have a smaller plate, the idea is to fill half your plate with non-starchy vegetables, ¼ of your plate with protein foods and the last ¼ of your plate with carbohydrate foods. 
Day two is even lighter fare. For breakfast, have one slice of whole-wheat toast, one egg cooked however you like, and half a banana. Lunch is one cup of cottage cheese, one hard-boiled egg, and five (yep, count 'em out) saltine crackers. Dinner features two hot dogs (just the hot dogs themselves, no buns or condiments), one cup of broccoli, a half cup of carrots, half a banana, and one half cup of vanilla ice cream.
Even small amounts of physical activity can help. Experts suggest that you aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity 5 days of the week.3 Moderate activity feels somewhat hard, and vigorous activity is intense and feels hard. If you want to lose weight or maintain weight loss, you may need to do 60 minutes or more of physical activity 5 days of the week.3
According to the website, the Military Diet requires you eat specific foods for breakfast, lunch, and dinner over the course of three days. The meal plan is extremely calorie-restrictive: on the first day, for instance, you can only eat roughly 1078 calories. (For comparison, the average, moderately active male needs roughly 2400 to 2600 calories per day.)
I would love to see a health professional’s list of substitutes for this diet! Is there by chance a vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free version? I understand the importance of following it strictly due to the scientific research behind the given foods, but I think it would be interesting to see a follow-up article or link to another publication that discusses what you can also use in the military diet.
Thanks for the article Jenna. I actually do something very similar when approaching a comp or a photoshoot…. I wouldn’t call it a diet as much as an advanced technique to prepare for something. Planning is definitely key….. I’m pretty disciplined, but when I’m tired or really hungry that all goes out the window. I’ve found that if I eat before I get too hungry and my food is pretty much all ready to go then I’m fine. If I’m super hungry and tired and I need to go to the grocery store then it all ends terribly… unless the thing I’m preparing for is really important and then I’m usually on top of it all the way.

However, it's safe to say that no one really knows the origin of the military diet, Yurechko said, as it is certainly not approved by the military. But if you are still a tad bit curious about taking this diet out for a spin, we spoke to some experts on the subject to make sure you have all the ins-and-outs. Here are some takeaways to keep in mind.
If what you're attracted to is the idea of a quick, three day challenge, Palinski-Wade has other ideas. "Challenge yourself to eat a minimum of 30 grams of fiber per day and at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables. This would still reduce calorie intake while providing your body with nutrients that promote health all while allowing you to develop eating habits that can actually lead to sustained weight loss." If it's the idea of inermittent fasting that you like, there are other ways to try that, too.
Jump up ^ Appel, Lawrence J.; Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Obarzanek, Eva; Swain, Janis F.; Miller, Edgar R.; Conlin, Paul R.; Erlinger, Thomas P.; Rosner, Bernard A. (2005-11-16). "Effects of protein, monounsaturated fat, and carbohydrate intake on blood pressure and serum lipids: results of the OmniHeart randomized trial". JAMA. 294 (19): 2455–2464. doi:10.1001/jama.294.19.2455. ISSN 1538-3598. PMID 16287956.
Sheila makes a smoothie from the body in storage then goes walking with her neighbors. She suggests the women should live life to the fullest. She tells them her new attitude is due to her new high protein diet. Joel goes to paranormal stores researching zombies. He finds two prints from Serbia that show someone vomiting up a red ball and then eating someone. Rick talks to the couple about their new car and then Dan interrupts bringing them more ant spray. Abby’s school calls them in and Principal Novak tells them Abby is missing school. They insist everything is normal. Sheila gets upset with Novak and she wants to eat him when he threatens to suspend Abby. Sheila tells Abby she should drop out causing Joel to confront Sheila about her behavior concluding he is not sure their family can survive it. Sheila talks to Eric who tells her the undead have no impulse control and she cannot change. Meanwhile Joel talks to Abby and they steal Rick’s motorcycle before they bond over freaking out about Sheila. Joel realizes Novak is Serbian. Dan sprays Joel’s yard for ants and finds Gary's finger.
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