Around one-third of adults in the U.S. are obese, and some estimates suggest that 500,000 people that will die this year in the US from an obesity-related illness. If we want to help reverse the dysfunctional state of moving less and eating more that we’re in, we need to include everyone, at every price point, at every level of food. Processed convenience foods can be better if we carefully craft the ingredients.
It can actually help you cut back on calories. That's because capsaicin, a compound found in jalapeno and cayenne peppers, may (slightly) increase your body's release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, which can speed up your ability to burn calories. What's more, eating hot peppers may help slow you down. You're less likely to wolfed down that plate of spicy spaghetti —— and therefore stay more mindful of when you're full. Some great adds: Ginger, turmeric, black pepper, oregano, and jalapenos.
Beware of Sugar: Your body processes carbohydrates differently than fats and proteins. Eating foods with a high glycemic index (those heavy in sugar and other quick-acting refined carbohydrates) will cause your blood sugar to quickly spike then crash, making you hungry again sooner. Whereas fats and proteins are processed slower and give you a sense of satiety which lasts longer. Calorie counting doesn't work for most people because it requires too much time, effort, and discipline. Eating vegetables and foods with a higher fat and protein content and less carbohydrates means you shouldn't need to count calories, as your body won't tell you that you are hungry when you don't need food. There are literally sugar candies in grocerie stores which are marketed using the label "a fat free food!" The "low fat" healty food marketing gimmicks came out of large agribusinesses creating demand for their frankenfood products.
"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
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