The term “diet” simply refers to food and drink that is regularly provided or consumed. However, it can also refer to eating or drinking sparingly or according to a prescribed set of rules. A diet may be considered healthy or unhealthy, often depending on individual needs. An unhealthy diet is often referred to as a fad diet, which is designed to help one lose weight and is temporarily popular. The decision to follow a fad diet is often made without the support or recommendation of a medical professional, and considered an unhealthy practice. An example of a fad diet might include recommendations that severely restrict calories or even entire food groups in an unhealthy way. Cleanses, juice diets, and detoxification diets are all examples of fad diets. Although many fad diets promise quick weight loss, most are not recommended for long-term use and do not support a healthful and balanced diet. Though many individuals may lose weight initially, it is often easily regained. At two-year follow-ups, research demonstrates a very low success rate for many of these diets. In fact, only 5% of the individuals who go on a diet each year keep off the weight that they lose.
Think of finding the right diet as akin to going on a long road trip. The more tools and guidance you have on your journey, the smoother your trip will be. Losing weight is a journey, not a destination, and along the way you'll learn a lot about yourself. Everyone wants to get there now, but what you'll discover along the way can ultimately be more fulfilling, rewarding, and even enjoyable. Finding the right weight-loss plan takes work and investment, and I hope I've helped simplify the process somewhat.
This can be really difficult and frustrating, and it’s very individual. Sometimes, it’s a matter of being honest with yourself and/or re-thinking what and how you’re eating and moving. It might be that you need a new routine—dance cardio is great at helping you push past boundaries—but even small adjustments (like cutting almond milk from your coffee) can make a difference if you need it.
Drink at least 2 liters (0.53 US gal) of water each day. Water has the double effect of both hydrating your body and filling your stomach with a certain volume of a liquid that has zero calories. The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (0.8 US gal) (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.[13]
"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
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