One breakfast staple you should probably avoid is orange juice. Most store brands contain a considerable amount of sugar. The same goes for all juices, so if juice is your drink of choice in the morning, have water instead. If you're dead-set on juice, your best bet is to squeeze it yourself, but even that doesn't have the same health benefits as eating whole fruit. When craving the taste of oranges, go for the real thing: peel one and eat the segments whole.
Over-exercising can actually cause adverse health-effects. Someone who goes from zero physical activity to two hours at the gym, four times a week is at risk for serious injury. A pulled muscle, a torn tendon, broken bone, or any number of things can happen if you push yourself too hard too fast. Then, instead of moving forward with your exercise routine, you'll be facing weeks of healing time, which can be discouraging if you set specific goals for yourself. Gretchen Reynolds' The First 20 Minutes is a great starter guide to healthy exercising.

“It’s no big surprise, but my go-to weight loss tip is to eat more vegetables. They are the most low-calorie food you can consume, and they’re filled with health-boosting, satiating nutrients. From smoothies and eggs to soups, main and side dishes, they can fit in anywhere and boost volume and nutrition. If you want to eat more while still losing weight, veggies are your answer. —Laura Burak, RD, CDN
Compare your portion sizes throughout the day to the recommended standards. For example, one serving of fruit is 1/2 cup or one small whole fruit, one serving of vegetables is one cup, one serving of grains is 1 oz or 1/2 of a cup, one serving of lean protein is 3 oz and one serving of low-fat dairy is one cup (milk and yogurt) or 2 oz of cheese.[5]
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